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Survivors Recall Panic Before Mexico City Hospital Blast; How Israeli High-Tech Security Firms Are Turning The US-Mexico Border Into A "New Kind of Hell": GR; Ayotzinapa Parents Reject PGR's Position; Juez Rechaza Demanda De Cassez: Proceso
Sunday, 18 January 2015 11:21

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The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners - Public Service

For a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper or news site through the use of its journalistic resources, including the use of stories, editorials, cartoons, photographs, graphics, videos, databases, multimedia or interactive presentations or other visual material, a gold medal. Awarded to The Washington Post for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security. and Awarded to The Guardian US for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, helping through aggressive reporting to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.

Finalists also nominated as a finalist in this category was Newsday, Long Island, N.Y., for its use of in-depth reporting and digital tools to expose shootings, beatings and other concealed misconduct by some Long Island police officers, leading to the formation of a grand jury and an official review of police accountability.

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INTERNATIONAL

BREAKING NEWS

GDP growth slowed to 2.6 percent in fourth quarter of 2014

Secret Service’s No. 2 seen as barrier to reform

Two weeks after the Secret Service forced out four top officials, lawmakers ask whether the agency should have ousted one more — its deputy director.

Timeline: Secret Service changes

Obama seeks $215 million for personalized medicine

The initiative would include creating a database of a million or more Americans who are willing to share genetic profiles to help doctors better understand illnesses.

Obama budget proposal would boost spending beyond ‘sequestration’ caps

Teens get a taste of first aid, assault rifles and grenades at Hamas camp

Youths take part in Hamas graduation ceremonies. (Levine for The Post)

The youth camps’ popularity suggests the military wing of Gaza’s Islamist movement will have plenty of eager recruits.

Thousands of young men flock to Hamas camps

Taliban claims responsibility for fatal attack on Americans in Kabul

Taliban claims responsibility for <br />fatal attack on Americans in Kabul

Three American civilian contractors and an Afghan national were killed in the attack.

Afghans want greater U.S. role than planned

Greece’s leftist government sparks fears of a Russian foothold in Europe

Greece’s leftist government sparks fears of a Russian foothold in Europe

The radical party Syriza’s support for Moscow complicates Western efforts to enact new sanctions.

Wonkblog: Greece might really leave the euro

Administration earns 4 Pinocchios for fishy math on 650,000 new jobs

Administration earns 4 Pinocchios <br /> for fishy math on 650,000 new jobs

FACT CHECKER | The Obama administration claims an Asian trade deal will create that many jobs.

You need to make $108,092 a year to live comfortably in D.C., report says

The only cities with a higher cost of comfort are New York boroughs and in the San Francisco Bay area.

John Kerry fined $50 for not shoveling his sidewalk in Boston

John Kerry fined $50 for not shoveling his sidewalk in Boston

IN THE LOOP | Yellow tape was put up warning of snow and ice falling from the home.

Teacher: Every day I see disparity in educational privilege. I’m disgusted.

Teacher: Every day I see disparity in educational privilege. I’m disgusted.

ANSWER SHEET | Where there isn’t money, there is excessive testing, lack of options and struggle.

Bill Cosby’s mess reminds me to talk with my girls about men and power

COLUMN | Moms need to talk with sons about violence; with daughers, it’s men, power and sexual abuse. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MEXICO NEWS

Image Credit

Survivors recall panic before Mexico City hospital blast

Inside the maternity hospital on the western edge of Mexico City, concern quickly turned to panic as the sour smell of propane seeped in and a vapor cloud grew at the emergency room's entrance. The crew of a gas tanker truck outside began yelling: "Call the firefighters! And tell people to get out!"

People in the hamlet of Santa Ursula began to worry when the logging started. In a few short weeks, more than a mile of densely forested riverbank was stripped from the Arroyo Sal to make way for heavy dredging equipment.

A Mexican party isn't complete without a piñata, and Melesio Vicente Flores and Cecilia Albarran Gonzalez have spent the last 25 years making high-end versions of the papier-mache figures to later be stuffed with candies and broken open with a stick or club.

A Frenchwoman who became a cause celebre in her country after she was jailed for kidnapping in Mexico is suing a former Mexican president, other ex-officials and a major TV network, her lawyer said Monday.
In the underworld of illegal drug trafficking, identical twins Pedro and Margarito Flores rose from middling Chicago dealers to partners of Mexico's most notorious cartel lord, eventually building a nearly $2 billion franchise that spanned much of North America.
The body of a journalist who was abducted by armed men three weeks ago has been found in eastern Mexico, authorities said Sunday, adding that a former police officer has confessed to carrying out the crime allegedly at the request of the town's mayor.

Bombardier cutting 1,000 jobs in Mexico, Kansas

Bombardier says it's going to cut about 1,000 employees from its Learjet business in 2015, affecting sites in Mexico and the United States.

Investigations of abductions in Mexico declined 18 percent last year, Mexico's national chief of anti-kidnapping efforts said Wednesday in crediting better state and federal coordination

The body of a missing 20-year-old college student has been found in the waters off Mexico by his father, who was searching for him from a plane.

U.S. Border Patrol agents shot and killed a man who had driven through a West Texas checkpoint without stopping for inspection, Customs and Border Protection said Friday.

Commuters in Mexico City showed off their underwear on Sunday by taking part in the annual "No Pants Subway Ride."

Maduro criticizes visit by 3 former Latin American leaders

President Nicolas Maduro on Friday blasted a weekend visit to Venezuela by the former leaders of Mexico, Chile and Colombia, accusing them of inadvertently lending support to extremist groups trying to oust him from power.
A Mexican court has ordered the recapture of a convicted drug lord sentenced to 40 years for the killing of a U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent.
Mexico detains new suspect in disappearance of 43 students

A purported drug cartel hit man has been arrested in connection with the disappearance and alleged killing of 43 college students in southern Mexico in September, authorities said Friday.

Top leaders of Mexico's Sinaloa cartel smuggled huge amounts of methamphetamine and other drugs to the United States, according to indictments unsealed Friday that reflect the organization's recent success dominating criminal activity on California's southern border.
The amount of marijuana seized at the Mexican border has fallen nearly 40 percent since 2011.
A former South Florida man has been arrested in Mexico 37 years after failing to surrender for a 10-month prison sentence.

Mexican mayor's wife to be tried for gang ties

The wife of the former mayor of a Mexican city where 43 students disappeared will be tried on organized crime charges.
Mexico has begun testing unmanned drones that could help it save the critically endangered vaquita marina, the world's smallest porpoise, which is threatened by illegal fishing in the upper Sea of Cortez.
For Mexicans living in the U.S. illegally and hoping to stay in the country under President Barack Obama's new immigration policy, things just got one step simpler.
Mexico's dominant telephone company says it will oppose a nearly $1 million fine imposed by regulators for the company's purportedly commercial alliance with a pay TV provider.

Aztec app brings historic Mexico codex into the digital age

A 16th century document considered one of the most important primary sources on the Aztecs of pre-Columbian Mexico went digital Thursday with a new app that aims to spur research and discussion.

Groups sue over Mexican wolf-reintroduction program changes

Conservationists sued the federal government Friday over changes to a reintroduction program for the endangered Mexican gray wolf.

This city on the border with California has for a fourth time blocked a gay couple from marrying in defiance of an order from Mexico's Supreme Court, the men's lawyer said Friday.

One of Mexico's most important and influential journalists of the past half century, Julio Scherer Garcia, died Wednesday at the age of 88, reported Proceso, the newsmagazine he founded.
Mr. Scherer, 88, founded the newsmagazine Proceso and helped expose political scandals
The governor of the southern Mexico state of Guerrero has asked prosecutors to drop charges against a U.S. citizen who returned to her home town to lead a vigilante movement.
Michoacan militias that were formed to fight drug cartels are now having shootouts with each other and the police
Mexico's state oil company wants to import about 100,000 barrels of light U.S. crude a day to mix with this country's heavier oil as a way to improve refinery processes.
Mexican authorities say 10 bodies and 11 severed heads have been discovered in clandestine graves in the troubled southern state of Guerrero.
Mexican authorities held 13 police officers for investigation Thursday in the disappearance of kidnapped journalist Moises Sanchez and awaited the results of DNA tests on a body found in the area to determine if it is him.
D.C. taxicab drivers have company in their complaints about a uniform paint scheme. In Mexico, officials have decreed all cabs be pink.
President Barack Obama embarked on a new year of foreign policy by welcoming Mexico's embattled president to the White House Tuesday, seeking help to jump start a new U.S. approach to immigration, Cuba and trade.
President Enrique Peña Nieto praised President Obama's executive order on undocumented immigrants.

Obama, Mexico's president discuss cartels, border security

© 1996-2010 The Washington Post Company

mardi 27 janvier, Sainte Angèle

Florence Cassez demande 36 millions de dollars au Mexique

Publié le 27/01/2015

International

Florence Cassez, détenue pendant sept ans au Mexique pour enlèvement, séquestration, délinquance organisée et détention d’armes à l’usage exclusif des forces armées, a entamé une action en justice auprès de la Cour suprême mexicaine pour obtenir 36 millions de dollars (environ 32 millions d’euros) de dommages et intérêts.

Selon l’avocat de la jeune femme, Me José Patiño Hurtado invité sur radio MVS, l’action en justice, lancée vendredi 23 janvier, visait l’ex-président mexicain Felipe Calderon (2006-2012), son ancien secrétaire particulier, l’actuel sénateur Roberto Gil, ainsi que les anciens ministres de la Sécurité publique, Genaro Garcia Luna, et de la Justice, Daniel Cabeza de Vaca. « Nous présentons une plainte pour dommage moral envers Florence Cassez, atteinte à ses sentiments, à sa réputation et à son honneur. Ils ont tué sa vie », a déclaré Me José Patiño Hurtado, qui a également estimé que l’ancien président Calderon, comme les autres personnalités visées, « était en charge et n'a pas empêché que soit commis l'illicite » contre Florence Cassez.

Une arrestation mise en scène de la police

L’action vise également la chaîne de télévision Televisa et un de ses présentateurs vedettes, Carlos Loret de Mola. Ils sont accusés d’avoir présenté comme une arrestation en direct une mise en scène de la police.

Plus, ICI

REUTERS

Security chief in violent Mexican state steps down

MEXICO CITY Thu Jan 22, 2015

(Reuters) - Mexico's Interior Ministry said on Thursday that a top security official appointed to restore order in a restive western state has stepped down, a few weeks after new outbreaks of violence.

Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong said the federal government's security commissioner for Michoacan state, Alfredo Castillo, would take on a new role in the government, without giving any more details on the reasons for his departure.

Castillo was appointed commissioner a year ago in a bid to crush a powerful drug gang known as the Knights Templar which had taken control of large swathes of Michoacan, and later became embroiled in bloody clashes with vigilante groups.

More, HERE.

Copyright



Mexico removes security envoy from troubled Michoacan

The Associated Press

January 22, 201

MORELIA, Mexico — The federal security commissioner appointed a little over a year ago for the troubled western state of Michoacan confirmed Thursday that he is being withdrawn by Mexico's government.

Security envoy Alfredo Castillo will be replaced by an army general, Felipe Gurrola, who will play a more limited role leading federal security forces in Michoacan, a largely agricultural state known for its limes and avocados but also social unrest and drug gang violence.

In a speech, Castillo gave a chilling description of how completely the pseudo-religious Knights Templar cartel once controlled everything from local police forces to industry, commerce and even everyday chores in what threatened to become a "failed state."

More, HERE.

Copyright

Toronto Sun

Drug gang members ate human hearts: Mexican government

Gabriel Stargardter, Reuters; January 06, 2015

MEXICO CITY - A vicious Mexican drug gang forced some members to eat the hearts of murder victims as part of a gruesome initiation rite to root out infiltrators, a government security official said on Tuesday, citing witness testimony.

For much of the past year, Michoacan, a mountainous, agricultural state in western Mexico, has been ravaged by fighting between drug gang henchmen and vigilantes who took up arms against the cartels but have since splintered into violent factions.

A mid-December shootout between two rival groups that killed 11 people has reignited fears the government is failing to control the state after flooding it with federal troops and pressing vigilantes into a fledgling rural police force.

More, HERE.

Copyright © 2015 All rights reserved

The Toronto Sun is a member of Canoe Sun Media Urban Newspapers.

Yahoo News

Security on agenda as embattled Mexican president visits Obama

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico's embattled President Enrique Pena Nieto will discuss security and justice with U.S. President Barack Obama in Washington next week amid public anger about how he has handled a probe into the apparent massacre of 43 trainee teachers.

Pena Nieto's standing has been battered by a string of massive street protests following the abduction and likely murder of 43 students by a drug gang working with corrupt police in the southwestern city of Iguala on the night of Sept. 26.

More, HERE.

Yahoo News Network

KREM2

December 31, 2014

VIDEO: Toddler fatally shot Blackfoot, ID mom at Hayden Walmart

Photo of Veronica Rutledge from her Facebook account.
Photo of Veronica Rutledge from her Facebook account. Family members granted KREM 2 permission to use the photo.(Photo: KREM)

HAYDEN, Idaho—A toddler shot and killed a Walmart shopper Tuesday morning in what deputies described as an "accident."

The woman was later identified by authorities said Veronica Rutledge from Blackfoot, Idaho. The father-in-law of Walmart shooting victim spoke with KREM 2 News Tuesday night. He called the shooting "tragic." He added the family "lost a beautiful, loving mother."

Walmart employees evacuated the Hayden store around 10:20 a.m. following the gunshot.
Deputies with the Kootenai County Sheriff's Office responded to the scene and found a 29-year-old woman dead inside the store.

Rutledge was shopping with four kids, when her two-year-old son reached into her purse, accessed her concealed 9mm Smith & Wesson M&P Shield semi-automatic handgun and accidentally discharged the weapon, according deputies. Authorities said the toddler was seated in the shopping cart when the gun was discharged. The woman and children were in the back of the store near the electronics area when the deadly shooting happened.

The bullet struck Mrs. Rutledge in the head, killing her instantly.

More, HERE.

© 2015 KREM, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, Inc.

GLOBAL RESEARCH

How Israeli High-Tech Security Firms Are Turning the U.S.-Mexico Border into a “New Kind of Hell”

U.S. borderlands are laboratories for nightmarish innovations.

More, HERE.
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International Court Calls on Mexico to Ban Genetically Modified Corn

By Ethan A. Huff;Global Research, January 16, 2015
GMO-Concept-Corn-Spelled-Out-Husk
Mexico is desperately trying to avoid a bioterrorism takeover by Big GMO, which is insistent upon ushering in genetically modified (GM) maize to replace the dozens of native corn varieties already grown throughout the country.

The Mexican Chapter of the Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal has issued an urgent plea to the Mexican government to once and for all ban all plantings of GM maize in order to avoid catastrophic losses to the “center of origin and diversity of this staple crop.”

The ruling, which came after the Tribunal spent three years gathering evidence from more than 1,000 organizations on GMO safety and effectiveness, warns that GM maize threatens to contaminate Mexico’s roughly 60 native corn varieties. More than just a staple crop, corn is a cultural treasure of Mexico, and because there is already a natural diversity of it, corn grows exceptionally well without the need for genetic alterations.

More, HERE.
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Obama Backs Beleaguered Mexican President Peña Nieto

“NAFTA-Land Security”: How Canada and Mexico Have Become Part of the U.S. Policing Regime

By Paul Ashby; Global Research, December 04, 2014

National Guard PFC monitors one of dozens of cameras on the border with Mexico at the Border Patrol’s Communications Center in Arizona (U.S. Army / Creative Commons)

During this summer’s child migrant crisis and the accompanying frenzy around “security” along the U.S.-Mexico boundary, a spotlight was shone on Mexico’s role in protecting the U.S. “homeland.” It helped illuminate what Washington considers the United States’ territorial boundaries: those of the countries associated with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In other words, the territories of Canada and Mexico are part of the U.S. policing regime, under a regional security framework we might call “NAFTA-land Security.”

Evidence of this emerged in July when a Congressional hearing featured a discussion on, as Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) put it, “what Mexico is actually doing to help us” regarding the unauthorized movement of Central American children. Some lawmakers and officials hinted that insufficient efforts by Mexican authorities made possible the unwanted migrants’ northward movement through Mexico.

In response, administration officials pointed to Mexican President Peña Nieto’s new southern border strategy, one that, as Todd Miller has written, involves the exportation of the U.S. border policing model to Mexico.

More, HERE.

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More Beheaded Bodies Discovered in Southern Mexico

Disappeared Students in Mexico: Global Struggle for Ayotzinapa Captures World’s Attention

By Telesur Global Research, November 22, 2014
More than 200 actions were carried out Thursday, coinciding with Mexico’s Day of Revolution.

A student’s skin was peeled over his head in a gruesome and clear display of a narco-state murder. The photo of the murder, which took place in the drug war-torn state of Guerrero some seven weeks ago, quickly went viral on the Internet. On the same day, five other people were killed and some 43 more students went “missing” in the small town of Ayotzinapa. In a press conference addressing the abuses more than one month after the disappearance of the students, who hailed from a rural-based and selective teachers college in Guerrero, an Attorney General presumed them “dead” without presenting any evidence to substantiate his conclusion. The nation’s leading prosecutor said he was “tired” by the end of the press conference, much to the chagrin of those who sympathized with the plight of the parents of the disappeared students.

Those happenings have served as the sparks that have ignited the nation’s ire to a feverish boiling point in one of the largest countries and economies of Latin America. Mexico has witnessed near daily and nation-wide actions of resistance. Since the disappearance of the “normalistas” (students training to be teachers) on September 26, the country has been brimming with mass marches, candle-light vigils, university-campus and labor-union-led strikes, occupations of official and university buildings, riot police-led arrests of demonstrators, property destruction of official buildings, sit-ins, panels ruminating over the ills of narco-state violence and international bridge closings.

While the 43 students, who are technically still missing due to the lack of any corpses being forensically tied to the students, were what clearly catalyzed the movement’s inception, much of the country has long been weary of the systematic problem of disappearances and the eery official impunity which has often surrounded them. Nothing less than some 24,000 disappearances, over the course of the last three years alone, account for official estimates. Other analysts estimate the actual total as being far higher than that.

The Mayor of Iguala and his wife, dubbed as the “imperial couple,” were arrested several weeks ago, as teleSUR previously reported. At the time of their arrest, speculation was that their detention may produce valuable clues that could help solve the case of the disappeared students. However, no significant advances have been made in the case since the detention of the couple. At the time of their arrest, the on-the-run couple were fugitives from the law and in hiding when authorities busted them at a rented home in Itzapalapa, Mexico City.

More, HERE.

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Angry Protests Sweep Mexico after Government Says Missing Students are Dead


Global Research, November 11, 2014
Angry protests swept Mexico over the weekend in the wake of a press conference Friday in which Jesús Murillo Karam, the country’s attorney general, declared that 43 missing teaching students from the Ayotzinapa Normal School in the state of Guerrero are all dead. Murrillo based this evaluation on confessions by gang members that they had killed the students, who were handed over to them by the police, and then burned their bodies.
Demonstrations in both Mexico City and the Guerrero capital of Chilpancingo saw clashes with police and attacks on government buildings. In the capital, a small group of demonstrators launched an attack on the historic National Palace in the city’s main square (El Zócalo). They first used metal security barriers to ram the building’s wooden door and then doused it with gasoline and set it on fire.
Some demonstrators questioned why it took police so long to respond to these acts, suggesting that they could have been the work of provocateurs.

More, HERE.

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More than 100,000 March in Mexico City over Disappeared Students

By Rafael Azul; Global Research, November 07, 2014

A mass protest march of more than 100,000 students, teachers, education workers and ordinary citizens took place in Mexico City on Wednesday, November 5, in solidarity with the 43 missing teaching students, normalistas, of the Ayotzinapa Normal School, who have been missing for over 40 days.

This was the third mass demonstration and by far the largest and angriest. Many of the participants directed their anger at President Enrique Peña Nieto, demanding that he resign. One protest sign denounced him “for corruption, betraying the nation, ineptitude,” calling him a “repressor and assassin.”
Others carried signs that said, “It was the State.” Leading the march were students from Mexico City’s National Autonomous Metropolitan University (UNAM), the Polytechnic Institute, rural teaching colleges, and Iberian-American University, who all had joined a massive nationwide 72-hour student strike.

At Mexico City’s Constitution Square (the Zócalo), many thousands greeted the protesters as they arrived after the two-and-a-half-hour march from the president’s mansion (Los Pinos). At the mass rally, family members of the 43 disappeared students spoke to the demonstrators. None of the major political parties (the governing PRI, the PAN, the PRD, the Greens) were involved in the protest.

More, HERE.
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Mexico Disarms Local Police in Missing Students’ City

By Press TV,Global Research, October 07, 2014
Mexican federal forces have disarmed the entire police department in the southern city of Iguala after its officers were accused of collaborating with a gang behind the recent disappearance of 43 students.
On Monday, the government’s new federal police unit took over security in Iguala, located some 200 kilometers (125 miles) south of the capital, Mexico City.

The federal unit was tasked with holding order in the city and helping search for the students who went missing last month after a deadly police shooting.

The deployment in the southern violence-stricken state of Guerrero came after President Enrique Pena Nieto vowed to establish justice and bring an end to corruption in the country.

Pena Nieto said he had dispatched the federal forces to Iguala to “find out what happened and apply the full extent of the law to those responsible.”The decision to disarm Iguala’s police corps came just days after 28 charred bodies were found in a mass grave on the outskirts of the city.

State prosecutor Inaky Blanco has said the recovered bodies probably belonged to the missing students. State officials also say it will take up to two weeks to receive the results of DNA tests to identify the corpses.

The students, all trainee teachers, went missing following a police attack on September 26 against a protest over teachers’ rights.

According to Blanco, state investigators have obtained video footage showing local police arresting a number of students during the clashes and taking them away.

Prosecutors said the Guerreros Unidos drug gang also participated in the police shooting that left six people dead and 25 others wounded.

Mexican authorities have already arrested 22 officers and issued arrest warrants for Iguala mayor Jose Luis Albarca and his security chief over the deadly incident.

More, HERE.
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Militarization and Political Crisis in Mexico

Is Mexico a Narco-State?

By Michael Werbowski;Global Research, May 31, 2010

Mexico - In the wake of Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s recent state visit to the U.S and Canada, a burning question remains without any clear answer.

2010 is historically significant for Mexico. It is its bi-centennial year of independence ( in 1810 the country began to break free from Spanish imperial tutelage) and perhaps more significantly is is also the centenary year of the 1910 Mexican revolution. There is little to celebrate though. The country this year, is still reeling from the vortex of drug-trafficking crimes, the global economic down-turn and the fall-out from the histrionics and panic induced by the H1N1-Swine flu “pandemic” of 2009.

Mexico after a decade of the centre-right almost “corporatist” PAN ( National Action Party) party’s rule, ( as in 2000, the first PAN candidate won the presidency, Vincente Fox) has been practically “Balkanised”. And as a result, it is now faced with a crippling fragmentation of the federation itself, due mainly to territorial battles or “turf wars” going on between rival drug cartels, which operate almost with impunity in many Mexican states. Possibly, the most fascinating and insightful read on this phenomenal topic is: Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State? . While I was pondering over the question raised by the book’s title , I was somewhat astonished to read in (despite what I witnessed first hand in Mexico) the concluding chapter, a rather reassuring reply. That basically, Mexico is far from becoming another Somalia, Pakistan or Haiti.

More, HERE.
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Destabilizing Mexico

By Rev. Richard Skaff; Global Research, March 13, 2009

Attorney General Eric Holder stated on February 25, 2009 that Mexican drug cartels pose a national security threat, and issued a direct warning to these cartels that they will be destroyed.

The warning came as the attorney general and acting Drug Enforcement Administration chief Michele Leonhart announced the completion of the final phase of DEA’s “Operation Xcellerator,” which targeted the Sinaloa cartel, a major western Mexico drug operation that has been expanding its reach into the United States . [1].

Meanwhile, the blood shed in the Mexican cities continues to be extensive and has expanded its tentacles of violence to various cities in Mexico. Lawlessness, corruption, murders, decapitations, and kidnappings have taken the Mexican cities by a storm, giving rise to a new radical group calling itself the Juarez Citizens Command that is threatening to strike back against lawlessness that has gripped Mexico for a long time. The group stated that they are going to strike back by killing one criminal a day until order and peace is restored. Similar groups are popping up all across Mexico. [2].

In its last report, the US Department of justice disclosed that 17.2 billion dollars in cash entered Mexico in only the past two years as a result of money laundering operation in their country. The report advised that Mexico and Colombia are the principal destinations of narco resources that operate in the US and that “the laundering of drug money is a global industry” with transnational organizations present in various countries. [2].

According to a DEA undercover operative, the Mexican drug cartels have gained more and more of the American market. They have grown bolder in their attempts to expand their operations in Mexico and the United States . They now control the ruling party in Mexico and operate the biggest drug business on earth right here in the USA . [2].

Mexico’s drug and violence problem now engulfs the entire country, inundating cities along the U.S.-Mexico border. The robust drug cartel reduced its position in the western mountains, and lunged into the heart of national power in Mexico City. The capital that was once relatively immune to such contemptuous boldness of drug killings has become the scene of multiple assassinations of high-ranking federal police officials in about a week. More than 1,000 people have been killed in Mexico this year in drug-related violence and about 6,290 in 2008. [11].

More, HERE.
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MORE MEXICO ARTICLES, BY GLOBAL RESEARCH, HERE

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I N T E R N A T I O N A L

“Je Suis CIA” By Larry Chin, January 17, 2015
cia

Since 9/11, the imperial playbook has consisted of time-tested tactic: the false flag operation. Carry out or facilitate a spectacular atrocity. Blame it on the enemy of choice. Issue a lie-infested official narrative, and have the corporate media repeat the lie. Rile up militant crowds, stoke the hatred, wage war with the public stamp of approval.

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Ali awakes armless

Massive terrorist attacks were hatched back soon after the pretext of cinematographic ‘terrorist’ attacks in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001. The people of Afghanistan were first in line, that winter bombing and invasion had been planned for some months before smoke billowed up from the Twin Towers.

Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies, Spring 2014

MEXICO: Center for Latin American Studies, University of California, Berkeley

Communities Up in Arms

Lorena Ojeda

 

The emergence of armed self-defense groups in the state of Michoacán has catapulted the region to the top of the Mexican federal government’s list of security concerns. Not all of these groups are alike, however. While the indigenous P’urhépecha community guards and the mestizo self-defense groups share many common grievances, they have arisen in response to different histories and different contemporary circumstances.

Concentrated in central and northwestern Michoacán, the P’urhépecha home area is divided into four sub-regions: the Sierra P’urhépecha; the Lake Pátzcuaro basin; the Ciénega de Zacapu; and the Cañada de los Once Pueblos. Disputes about land ownership and access to natural resources have long made the region a hot spot for both intra- and inter-community violence. Although agrarian conflicts in the region date back to the colonial era, they were exacerbated by the agrarian reform initiatives following the Mexican Revolution, in large part because the distribution of lands to one community almost always impacted the interests of its neighbors. The reforms resulted in bloody clashes that sowed distrust between the communities. To further complicate matters, this infighting made it easier for outside interest groups to gain a foothold in the area. Revolutionary and post-revolutionary bandits devastated indigenous villages, taking advantage of their divisions.  It was from this complex stew of conflicts that the community guards emerged.

More, HERE.

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The Berkeley Blog

Not everyone mourns for Ayotzinapa’s students

Forty-three student teachers (normalistas) disappeared on the evening of September 26 in the municipality of Iguala, in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero. The incident has attracted national and international attention, and it has also generated a wealth of speculation and misinformation. The daily reports concerning the discovery of numerous mass graves have further muddied the waters; the only silver lining, such as it is, in these reports is that the missingnormalistas do not appear to have been buried in any of the discovered grave sites. The contrast between the hope that the normalistas might still be alive, and the despair of living in a country where mass graves can seemingly be uncovered by simply kicking over a few stones, is striking.

But perhaps the most depressing aspect of this story is the indifference of some Mexicans that have even attempted to argue that the normalistas somehow deserved their fate because of their “rebellious attitudes” or their “delinquent” appearance. Thus, a society already divided by social class, skin color, linguistic differences, clothing styles, the size of one’s bank account, zip codes, and a host of other frivolous matters has found new ways of demarcating distinct types of Mexicans: “good” versus “bad”; those that receive justice versus those that do not; and those that can versus those that do not even deserve to try.

Meanwhile, Mexico’s political parties are only interested in representing and advancing their own interests. The left has lost its identity in its efforts to reach power. The right, which is more concerned with maintaining the appearance of good behavior, has shrouded itself in silence and indifference. And the ruling party’s principal preoccupation is the next election cycle and the perpetuation of its political dynasty, not the needs of Mexico’s citizens.

The Ayotzinapa case reveals the deterioration of Mexico’s political and social spheres. The missing normalistas are poor, indigenous or mestizo (mixed-race), and brown-skinned. Their hair is straight, they are not particularly tall, and they speak with the accents of the countryside. Simply put, they are Mexicans. But their surnames – Tizapa, Jacinto, Patolzin, Ascencio, Tlatempa, and Lauro, among others – are not among Mexico’s famous, and they are more likely to be found in the country’s seemingly infinite number of mass graves, as opposed to a social club or the halls of the stock market. The divide between Mexicans has become so great that some are not even moved by the heartrending pain experienced by the parents whose sons are missing.

The Ayotzinapa case has quickly become symbolic of the daily disappearances and murders that occur in Mexico, and of the mass graves that vastly outnumber the number of roads, hospitals, universities, and science and technology centers that have been built in recent years.

Throughout the world, many are pressuring the Mexican government to resolve the matter and bring those responsible to justice. Hundreds of thousands of Mexicans have taken to the streets demanding that the normalistas be found, while also calling out the shamelessness of the governments, political parties, and dominant social classes that allowed the disappearances to occur. But there are millions of Mexicans, and the majority of them appear to have been stunned into silence by the Mexican apocalypse, or have chosen to express their outrage safely behind closed doors.

COMMENTS

NOTE: Professor Lorena Ojeda authorized Security Corner in Mexico to republish this article. She is a visiting scholar in the Department of History at UC Berkeley and a professor of history at Mexico's Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo. Her work at Berkeley is supported by the Fulbright García-Robles and CONACYT grants. Ojeda recently published the article "Communities Up in Arms," on the emergence of armed self-defense groups in the state of Michoacán, in the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies.
ed.

NPR

December 26, 2014, Scott Neuman

NPR's Carrie Kahn reports that the body of a kidnapped Catholic priest has been discovered after he was seized in the southern state of Guerrero earlier this week.

The body of Rev. Gregorio Lopez Gorostieta was found with a gunshot wound to the head, not far from the seminary where he lived near Ciudad Altamirano. Carrie says he is the third priest this year to be killed in Guerrero, where 43 students were kidnapped by corrupt police and presumably murdered by drug traffickers. Gorostieta is the first, however, to have been seized since the students disappeared in September.

More, HERE.

More MEXICO stories by NPR, HERE.

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November 19, 2014

Eyder Peralta

Amid rumblings about conflict of interest and corruption, Mexico's first lady says she will sell a multimillion-dollar home in one of the most glamorous areas of Mexico City.


In a YouTube video released late Tuesday, Angélica Rivera defiantly proclaims that she has "nothing to hide."
"I have worked all my life, and because of that I am an independent woman capable of building a patrimony with honesty," she said.
Rivera and her husband, President Enrique Peña Nieto, have been under heavy scrutiny lately: first, because of the way the government has handled the case of 43 students who went missing after they were detained by police, and then after Aristegui Noticias revealed that an opulent modern structure dubbed "The White House" and valued at $7 million was owned by a construction company awarded millions in government contracts.
As Aristegui explained, the house, which Rivera showed off in a glitzy spread in the royal-centric magazine ¡Hola!, was just another symbol of the "close relationship between Peña Nieto and Grupo Higa."
According to the investigation, Grupo Higa is owned by Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantú, who in the past rented out airplanes for the Peña Nieto's 2012 presidential campaign. The company, Aristegui reports, received millions of dollars in contracts in the state of Mexico when Peña Nieto was governor.
Once Peña Nieto was in the presidential palace, a subsidiary of Hinojosa's company was awarded part of a huge contract to build a high-speed train from Mexico City to Querétaro.
Just days before the report was published, Peña Nieto canceled the $3.7 billion contract.
More, HERE.

© 2014 NPR

Business Monitor International

Industry Forecast - Mexico Offers Strongest Banking Sector Growth Potential - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Latin America / Economy

Slowing economic activity will temper asset and loan growth in several Latin American economies throughout our five-year forecast period. In contrast, we see stronger banking sector growth prospect...

Read article

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Risk Summary - Mexico - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Mexico / Economy

Mexico's Short-Term Political Risk Rating (STPRR) remains unchanged from last month at 63.5, ranking 8th out of 17 Latin American countries scored, and 12.3 points below regional leader Chile. Mexi...

Read article

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Political Risk Analysis - Ruling PRI To Lose Support In Midterms Due To Iguala Crisis - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Mexico / Economy

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto's approval rating will continue to fall in the coming months, as the disappearance of 43 students in Iguala heightens concerns over security and corruption. This will have negative implications for the ruling Partido Institucional Revolucionario in the June 2015 mid-term elections, increasing the odds of a strong result by the main centre-right opposi...

READ FULL ARTICLE

© 2015 Business Monitor International

Al Jazeera America

Crude harvest: Selling Mexico's oil

VIDEO: Mexico may be hitting the perfect storm when it opens its energy resources to foreign investors.

30 Dec 2014

Against the backdrop of Mexico's ever-widening gap between rich and poor, growing violence, and stalled economy, President Enrique Pena Nieto has passed a series of economic reforms.

Under these reforms, Mexico's oil, which was expropriated from foreign interests 75 years ago, is now for sale to private, international companies.

Twenty years ago, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which opened Mexico up to trade with the US and Canada, led to the collapse of agriculture, and paved the way to the privatization of oil.

The operations of Mexico's state-owned oil company, Pemex, have never been entirely transparent, and communities have been crippled by oil disasters. For instance, in October 2013, the state of Tabasco experienced its worst oil disaster when a drill site exploded and burned for 55 days, contaminating the surrounding land and water. Villagers closest to the site say they are suffering from health problems and have lost their livestock. They say Pemex has never accepted responsibility for the accident, nor has it offered any compensation.

More, HERE.

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OPINION: Privatising Mexico's oil industry spells disaster

In the absence of strong state institutions, the privatisation of Mexico's oil industry will be disastrous.

30 Dec 2014, By

Edgardo Buscaglia is a Senior Law and Economics Scholar at Columbia University in New York and President of the Instituto de Accion Ciudadana in Mexico.

Who can deny that Mexico is one of the most admired cradles of civilisation, with its culture and history considered an integral part of the world's historical heritage. Yet, Mexico is also a country whose population for centuries has been raped by corrupt authoritarian governments; it is a country which has suffered domestic and regional conflicts leading to foreign interventions backing extractive business interests.

The 1910 Mexican Revolution brought together various groups calling for social justice. It was a natural reaction to centuries of foreign looting of Mexico's resources. One of the consequences of the Revolution was the decision by the

Mexican government to nationalise the immense reserves of oil in the 1930s.

However, it seems that Mexican politicians today have failed to learn a lesson from history. The administration of Mexican President Pena Nieto recently approved legal reforms which will make it possible once again for private firms to become the major players in the Mexican oil business.

More, HERE.

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Who's making money off the War on Drugs?

Disappearance of 43 students from Mexico spurred a national debate about the winners and losers in war on drugs.

Since the disappearance of 43 students from #Ayotzinapa school in Guerrero, Mexico, people around the world have taken to the streets to demand an end to drug-related crime and the close ties between drug cartels, police and political institutions. So if everybody's losing, who's winning?

The rebel spirit driving Mexico’s protests has deep roots

Analysis: Outrage over case of 43 missing students has helped unleash widespread discontent with a deep historical echo

Protests over missing students spread in Mexico

A chronology of the disappearance of 43 students from a teachers’ college in Mexico and its aftermath

Mexico’s church calls for government to change response to violence

Cardinal Norberto Rivera Carrera calls changes ‘necessary,’ says pope is monitoring case of 43 missing students

Cuba-US thaw is a win for Latin America

Analysis: Return of US-Cuban diplomatic relations will affect entire region and possibly isolate Venezuela

Latin America celebrates new US-Cuba era

Chile’s minister of foreign relations calls the Obama and Castro speeches the beginning of the end of the Cold War

VIDEO: Mexico's Nieto faces growing calls to resign

02 Dec 2014

President's second anniversary in office marred by protests as he and the government are accused of corruption.

With help from the Obama administration, Peña Nieto is brutally reshaping Mexican society

Through the story of one immigrant family, we explore the evolution of racism and migration in the US.

President Pena Nieto proposes changes to police force following uproar over presumed massacre of 43 students.

Ferguson: Lawmakers urge calm, offer few policy prescriptions

Analysis: Think riots have never caused change in America? Think again

Brown's parents vow to 'keep fighting' for justice

Protesters upset by Ferguson decision storm St. Louis City Hall

Confronting race and inequality in the US

Week before verdict, 12 killed by US law enforcement

Please click on HERE to get updated Al Jazeera, Mexico news

Drug trafficking organizations are rapidly splintering, but there€’s no end in sight to the violence

Topics:

Mexico

Drugs

Drug Cartels
The village warriors of Guerrero

Cocaine, heroin and avocados


Tens of thousands of people angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students are marching in Mexico City as part of another day of nationwide protests.

Protesters on Thursday waved blackened flags of Mexico and many chanted for the resignation of President Enrique Pena Nieto. "He will fall, he will fall, Pena Nieto will fall," they chanted.

Some protesters clashed with riot police near the city's international airport at the start of the day's demonstrations, burning tyres, throwing firebombs and launching firecrackers at police.
Thursday’s protest was the latest protest over the government's handling of a crime that has infuriated Mexicans fed up with corruption, impunity and a drug war that has left more than 100,000 people dead or missing since 2006.

The case has turned into the biggest challenge of Pena Nieto's nearly two-year-old presidency, on top of another scandal over a mansion his wife bought from a government contractor.
'Mexico is hurting'

The crisis erupted after the mayor of the city of Iguala allegedly ordered police to confront students on September 26, sparking a night of violence that left six people dead and 43 missing, authorities say.
Protesters angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students take to the streets for another day of demonstrations.

More, HERE.

Police officer fires on Mexico City students, inflaming tensions

Students had been planning for a Nov. 20 national strike in solidarity with 43 missing students from Guerrero

INSIDE STORY

VIDEO: Missing Mexico students: Who is responsible.

Protesters demand justice for missing 43 trainee teachers who are feared murdered in Mexico. To watch video click on HERE.

Mexico president pushes trade ties in China while protests rage at home

Peña Nieto's Beijing trip amid massive political crisis at home shows heavy bet on China ties as economic boost

Mexico missing student protesters burn state buildings

Protest movement has hit Guerrero'€™s tourism industry with vacationers canceling trips during busiest time of year.

Photos: In Acapulco, an angry demonstration over missing students

Students, peasants and others attempt to block the airport and clash with police.

Mexico leader travels to Asia amid rising unrest over missing students

Peña Nieto faces increased calls to resign as another presidential scandal emerged over the weekend

Mexico protesters set fire to National Palace over missing students

Gang members have confessed to killing the 43 missing students and dumping their charred remains in a landfill.

Gang members confess to mass killing of Mexico students

Charred human remains found in a dumpster are likely the students who disappeared on Sept. 26, Mexican authorities say.

Mexican army accepts criticism of human rights commission in killings

The defense department says, however, it doesn't agree with all findings of human rights commission on the June slayings.

Why have the most recent kidnappings in Mexico sparked such outrage?

The disappearance of 43 students in Mexico has triggered nationwide demonstrations for government accountability.

Thousands protest missing Mexico students despite mayor arrest

Public anger over student disappearances brings Mexico City to a standstill; full-blown crisis for President Peña Nieto.

Photos: Protests over 43 Guerrero students target government buildings

A city congress and buildings tied to the ruling party are trashed and burned.

The food producer has developed more than 480 varieties of wheat, upping production by an estimated 200 million tonnes.
Mexican official: CIA 'manages' drug trade

Spokesman for Chihuahua state says US agencies don't want to end drug trade, a claim denied by other Mexican officials

24 Jul 2012, by Chris Arsenault

Juarez, Mexico - The US Central Intelligence Agency and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers", a spokesman for the Chihuahua state government in northern Mexico has told Al Jazeera, instead "they try to manage the drug trade".
Allegations about official complicity in the drug business are nothing new when they come from activists, professors, campaigners or even former officials. However, an official spokesman for the authorities in one of Mexico's most violent states - one which directly borders Texas - going on the record with such accusations is unique.

"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva, the Chihuahua spokesman, told Al Jazeera last month at his office in Juarez. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."

Accusations are 'baloney'

Villanueva is not a high ranking official and his views do not represent Mexico's foreign policy establishment. Other more senior officials in Chihuahua State, including the mayor of Juarez, dismissed the claims as "baloney".

"I think the CIA and DEA [US Drug Enforcement Agency] are on the same side as us in fighting drug gangs," Hector Murguia, the mayor of Juarez, told Al Jazeera during an interview inside his SUV. "We have excellent collaboration with the US."

Under the Merida Initiative, the US Congress has approved more than $1.4bn in drug war aid for Mexico, providing attack helicopters, weapons and training for police and judges.

More than 55,000 people have died in drug related violence in Mexico since December 2006. Privately, residents and officials across Mexico's political spectrum often blame the lethal cocktail of US drug consumption and the flow of high-powered weapons smuggled south of the border for causing much of the carnage.

"The war on drugs is an illusion," Hugo Almada Mireles, professor at the Autonomous University of Juarez and author of several books, told Al Jazeera. "It's a reason to intervene in Latin America."

"The CIA wants to control the population; they don't want to stop arms trafficking to Mexico, look at [Operation] Fast and Furious,” he said, referencing a botched US exercise where automatic weapons were sold to criminals in the hope that security forces could trace where the guns ended up.
The Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms lost track of 1,700 guns as part of the operation, including an AK-47 used in 2010 the murder of Brian Terry, a Customs and Border Protection Agent.

More, HERE.

© 2014 Al Jazeera America, LLC. All rights reserved.

InSight Crime

InSight Crime is a foundation dedicated to the study of the principal threat to national and citizen security in Latin America and the Caribbean: organized crime. We seek to deepen and inform the debate about organized crime in the Americas by providing the general public with regular reporting, analysis and investigation on the subject and on state efforts to combat it. More about Insight Crime HERE.

Iguala Massacre: Mexico's PR Message Goes Up in Flames

The stunning, dramatic blow-by-blow account of what most likely happened to the 43 missing students in Guerrero is an indication of just how desperately Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto and his team are trying to perform damage control on a terrifying story -- one that has not only unsettled his government, but has pushed them to admit that things are not as their public relations machine would have you believe.

In the hour-long November 7 press conference (see video below), Attorney General Jose Murillo Karam announced that the recent capture of alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos led to confessions that the students were taken by police while en route to the town of Iguala. The police handed the students over to the Guerreros Unidos, who then killed them and burned their remains.

Specifically, video testimonies from three recently captured “masterminds” of the attacks revealed that the students were carted like cattle to a landfill in Cocula. According to one suspect, approximately 15 students asphyxiated on the way to the dump site. The remaining students were interrogated by members of the Guerreros Unidos before being shot and killed. The bodies were then thrown into the landfill, arranged in a circle, covered in sticks, gasoline, and diesel, and burned. The fire reportedly lasted for 14 hours, from midnight on September 27, until mid-afternoon.

According to the testimonies, a leader of the criminal group known as “El Terco” ordered the burned human remains to be collected and placed into eight black plastic bags. Members of the Guerreros Unidos then took the bags to the San Juan River in Cocula, where they dumped the contents into the water, while two bags were thrown directly into the river.

Following the confessions, search teams found black bags, one of which was still closed. Mexican and Argentine forensic teams reportedly confirmed the bag contained human remains. However, due to the degree to which the bodies were burned, forensic experts have not yet determined when the remains will be able to be identified.

More, HERE.

Home

A Battle Has Erupted Over Washington’s Legal Cannabis Plazas

By Bill Conroy - December 18, 2014 at 8:08 pm

The Outcome Could Help Define A Path To A Peaceful End To the Drug War

A major turf war has erupted in the grand experiment to legalize marijuana in the state of Washington.

However, this battle is being waged with the tools of politics, the courts and organizing, unlike the drug war, where disputes over control of the drug plazas, or markets, normally are settled with bullets.

The stakes are high in this turf dispute in Washington, with hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue on the table and the future of a nascent cannabis industry hanging in the balance.

More, HERE.

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Torture Report Reveals CIA’s Manipulation of US Media

By Bill Conroy - December 12, 2014

Agency Used Classified Information As Currency For Deception

The recently released Senate Select Committee on Intelligence report pillorying the CIA’s Bush-era detention and interrogation program is replete with lurid details of what would commonly be called torture, if those practices were carried out on you or me.

Waterboarding, rectal feeding, sleep deprivation, coffin-size cells and forcing detainees to stand in stress positions, even with broken bones, is the stuff of a horror movie. But there is another revelation in the long-awaited, and controversial, Senate committee report that so far seems to have slipped past much examination in the public spotlight.

More, HERE.

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US Military’s Training of Mexican Security Forces Continues As Human-Rights Abuses Mount In Mexico

Posted by Bill Conroy - December 3, 2014

DoD Officials Claim Training is Part of the Solution, Not the Problem

The U.S. government has spent more than $62 million since fiscal year 2010 providing highly specialized training to Mexican security forces, including some $16.3 million in fiscal 2013, as part of an effort to help Mexico better prosecute its war on drugs, records made public under the U.S. Foreign Assistance Act show.

Local Opposition to Washington’s Legal Marijuana Businesses Is a Taxing Issue For the Fledgling Industry

Posted by Bill Conroy - November 14, 2014

Effort to Overcome City Moratoriums on Cannabis Shops Could Spark an Unlikely Alliance

The great experiment in the state of Washington to legalize the sale of marijuana through a regulated and taxed market has hit a hitch at the local level that threatens to slow progress to a snail’s pace, even as more and more marijuana businesses obtain the state licensing needed to open their doors.

Through early November, Washington’s cannabis market, state records show, included some 63 retailers, 239 producers and 197 processors — all issued the required state-level licenses to begin doing business in the state. But the battle ahead for many of them — and others in the pipeline — to actually open their doors for business is far from over.

More, HERE.
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Labor Unions Are Supporting Washington State Legal Marijuana Dispensaries that Create "More Workers to Organize"

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 22, 2014

The United Food and Commercial Workers and other Unions Seek to Strengthen Protections for Cannabis Workers

What’s going on in the state of Washington and beyond with the movement to legalize marijuana is, only in part, about business, taxes and government oversight — all to be amplified by the billions of dollars annually this new industry promises to throw off.

More, HERE.
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Community Police in Guerrero’s Costa Chica Region to Celebrate 19 Years of a Better Way to Combat Crime and Corruption

The Same Southern Mexican State Where 43 Students Were Disappeared Is also Home to a Grassroots Movement that Shows How People Can Police Themselves When the State Becomes Criminal.

By Greg Berger and Oscar Olivera

Special for The Narco News Bulletin

November 7, 2014

Publisher’s Note: In Mexico and throughout the world the state of Guerrero has become a vivid example of the horrors of the “war on drugs” and the pervasive corruption and violence it invites from all levels of government. On September 26, Mayor Jose Luis Abarca of the city of Iguala ordered police to detain a group of students from the local Ayotzinapa teachers’ college. The mayor’s ties to organized crime have been widely documented. It is believed that the mayor thought the students were planning to stage a protest at a public event held by his wife. Police then killed six students, and 43 more were disappeared. The police reportedly turned the 43 youths over to a local criminal gang. Multiple mass graves have been dug up in the area, each at first rumored to contain the bodies of the students, then have been revealed to be the tombs of previous nameless casualties of the US-imposed drug war.

The whereabouts of the missing students are still unknown.

More, HERE.
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Millions Missing From DEA Money-Laundering Operation

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 6, 2014

But No One With the Power to Investigate Seems to Care
At least $20 million went missing from money seizures by law enforcers, critical evidence was destroyed by a federal agency, a key informant was outed by a US prosecutor — contributing to her being kidnapped and nearly killed — and at the end of the day not a single narco-trafficker was prosecuted in this four-year-long DEA undercover operation gone awry.
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Charles Bowden has died, but his voice is louder than ever

Posted by Bill Conroy - September 2, 2014

As one of the original authentic journalists, he trailblazed a path for others to follow
When I heard that he had passed, my eyes welled with tears. I’m of stoic Irish stock, so I don’t shed tears easily, but the news of Charles Bowden’s death (1945-2014) was not an easy thing to bear. He had been a mentor and a friend to me for a decade, and his leaving hurts.
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Posted by Bill Conroy - May 7, 2014
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U.S. Military: More Counter-Narcotics Funding Will Help Stem Exodus of Children from Central America

By Bill Conroy - July 29, 2014

 

Critics Argue Drug-War Money is Part of the Problem, Not the Solution.

 

Some 58,000 migrant children, mostly Central Americans, have made the treacherous journey to the U.S. southern border alone over the past 10 months, but actions being considered by U.S. officials to combat the problem with more military and drug-war aid to their countries, critics warn, may worsen the violence that provokes this unprecedented exodus.

 

The number of unaccompanied children that have arrived at the U.S. border so far this fiscal year is up 106 percent from the same period a year earlier — with the total expected to reach 90,000 before Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year.


To put that latter number in perspective, it is nearly five times larger than the number of Border Patrol agents now stationed along the entire southern border.

More, HERE.
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MORE NARCO NEWS, HERE

25 Deadliest Mass Shootings in U.S. History Fast Facts

By CNN Library; September 2, 2014

(CNN) -- Here is a list of the 25 deadliest single day mass shootings in U.S. history from 1949 to the present. If the shooter was killed or committed suicide during the incident that death is not included in the total.

Timeline:

32 killed - April 16, 2007 - Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. A gunman, 23-year-old student Seung-Hui Cho, goes on a shooting spree killing 32 people in two locations and wounds an undetermined number of others on campus. The shooter, Seung-Hui Cho then committed suicide.

27 killed - December 14, 2012 - Sandy Hook Elementary School - Newtown, Connecticut. Adam Lanza, 20, guns down 20 children, ages 6 and 7, and six adults, school staff and faculty, before turning the gun on himself. Investigating police later find Nancy Lanza, Adam's mother, dead from a gunshot wound. The final count is 28 dead, including the shooter.

23 killed - October 16, 1991 - In Killeen, Texas, 35-year-old George Hennard crashes his pickup truck through the wall of a Lubys Cafeteria. After exiting the truck, Hennard shoots and kills 23 people. He then commits suicide.

21 killed - July 18, 1984 - In San Ysidro, California, 41-year-old James Huberty, armed with a long-barreled Uzi, a pump-action shotgun and a handgun shoots and kills 21 adults and children at a local McDonalds. A police sharpshooter kills Huberty one hour after the rampage begins.

18 killed - August 1, 1966 - In Austin, Texas, Charles Joseph Whitman, a former U.S. Marine, kills 16 and wounds at least 30 while shooting from a University of Texas tower. Police officers Ramiro Martinez and Houston McCoy shot and killed Whitman in the tower. Whitman had also killed his mother and wife earlier in the day.

14 killed - August 20, 1986 - Edmond, Oklahoma part-time mail carrier, Patrick Henry Sherrill, armed with three handguns kills 14 postal workers in ten minutes and then takes his own life with a bullet to the head.

13 killed - November 5, 2009 - Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan kills 13 people and injures 32 at Fort Hood, Texas, during a shooting rampage. He is convicted and sentenced to death.

13 killed - April 3, 2009 - In Binghamton, New York, Jiverly Wong kills 13 people and injures four during a shooting at an immigrant community center. He then kills himself.

13 killed - April 20, 1999 - Columbine High School - Littleton, Colorado. 18-year-old Eric Harris and

17-year-old Dylan Klebold kill 12 fellow students and one teacher before committing suicide in the school library.

13 killed - September 25, 1982 - In Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 40-year-old George Banks, a prison guard, kills 13 people including five of his own children. In September 2011, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturns his death sentence stating that Banks is mentally incompetent.

13 killed - September 5, 1949 - In Camden, New Jersey, 28-year-old Howard Unruh, a veteran of World War II, shoots and kills 13 people as he walks down Camden's 32nd Street. His weapon of choice is a German-crafted Luger pistol. He is found insane and is committed to a state mental institution. He dies at the age of 88.

12 killed - September 16, 2013 - Shots are fired inside the Washington Navy Yard killing 12. The shooter, identified as Aaron Alexis, 34, is also killed.

12 killed - July 20, 2012 - Twelve people are killed and 58 are wounded in a shooting at an Aurora, Colorado, movie theater screening of the new Batman film. James E. Holmes, 24, is taken into custody outside of the movie theater. The gunman is dressed head-to-toe in protective tactical gear, set off two devices of some kind before spraying the theater with bullets from an AR-15 rifle, a 12-gauge shotgun and at least one of two .40-caliber handguns police recovered at the scene.

12 killed - July 29, 1999 - In Atlanta, 44-year-old Mark Barton kills his wife and two children at his home. He then opens fire in two different brokerage houses killing nine people and wounding 12. He later kills himself.

10 killed - March 10, 2009 - In Alabama, Michael McLendon of Kinston, kills 10 and himself. The dead include his mother, grandparents, aunt and uncle.

9 killed - March 21, 2005 - Red Lake High School, Red Lake, Minnesota. 16-year-old Jeff Weise kills his grandfather and another adult, five students, a teacher and a security officer. He then kills himself.

9 killed - June 18, 1990 - In Jacksonville, Florida, 42-year-old James Pough, angry about his car being repossessed, opens fire at at a General Motors Acceptance Corp. office, killing nine people. Pough takes his own life.

8 killed - October 12, 2011 - Eight people are killed during a shooting at the Salon Meritage in Seal Beach, California. The suspect, Scott Evans Dekraai, 41, of Huntington Beach, is arrested without incident as he is trying to leave the scene. The eight dead include Dekraai's ex-wife, Michelle Fournier, 48. He was armed with three guns -- a 9 mm Springfield, a Smith & Wesson .44 Magnum, and a Heckler & Koch .45 -- and was wearing body armor during the shooting rampage.

8 killed - August 3, 2010 - Manchester, Connecticut - Omar Thornton kills eight co-workers at Hartford Distributors before turning the gun on himself. Thornton had been asked to resign for stealing and selling alcoholic beverages.

8 killed - January 19, 2010 - Christopher Speight, 39, kills eight people at a house in Appomattox, Virginia. He surrenders to police at the scene the next morning, and is charged with one count of murder with additional charges pending.

8 killed - March 29, 2009 - In Carthage, North Carolina, 45-year-old Robert Stewart kills a nurse and seven elderly patients at a nursing home. In May, the Moore County district attorney announces she will seek the death penalty. On September 3, 2011, a jury finds Stewart guilty of second-degree murder. Stewart is sentenced to 141 to 179 years in prison.

8 killed - December 5, 2007 - In Omaha, Nebraska, 19-year-old Robert Hawkins goes to an area mall and kills eight shoppers before killing himself.

8 killed - July 1, 1993 - In San Francisco, 55-year-old Gian Luigi Ferri kills eight people in a law office and then kills himself.

8 killed - September 14, 1989 - In Louisville, Kentucky, 47-year-old Joseph Wesbecker armed with a AK-47 semiautomatic assault rifle, two MAC-11 semiautomatic pistols, a .38 caliber handgun, a 9-millimeter semiautomatic pistol and a bayonet kills eight co-workers at Standard Gravure Corporation and then kills himself. He had been placed on disability leave from his job due to mental problems.

8 killed - August 20, 1982 - In Miami, 51-year-old history teacher Carl Robert Brown, angry about a repair bill and armed with a shotgun, kills eight people at a machine shop. He flees by bicycle, but is shot in the back by a witness who pursued him. He was on leave from school for psychological treatment.

List of rampage killers (school massacres), by Wikipedia

List of school shootings in the United States, by Wikipedia

Starting with Pontiac's Rebellion school massacre on July 26, 1764 to August 6, 2014in River Woods Elementary when an 11-year-old student at RWES in Des Moines, Iowa, brought a BB gun to the school accompanied by two former students aged 11 & 16. The student admitted to having the weapon and making threats against 4 students. Police recovered the gun and arrested the alleged students
More, HERE.

America's Wars: U.S. Casualties and Veterans

The table below has information about the total number of service members, battle deaths, and nonmortal woundings in wars from 1775 to 2012; such as the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War I and II, Vietnam, and more
Information Please® Database, © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

67% of all homicides in the U.S. were conducted using a firearm: UN

According to the FBI, in 2012, there were 8,855 total firearm-related homicides in the US, with 6,371 of those attributed to handguns. 61% of all gun-related deaths in the U.S. are suicides. More, HERE by Wikipedia.

Crime in the United States

Crime in the United States has been present since colonization
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

© 2014 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Bello

The Mexican morass

A president who doesn’t get that he doesn’t get it

IN A new year message Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, promised to work to “liberate” his country from crime, corruption and impunity. His cabinet has duly set these as its priorities. The message is the right one. But unfortunately for Mr Peña, Mexicans are increasingly cynical about the messenger.

Mexico is still seething over the government’s leaden response to the kidnap in September of 43 students by municipal police in the south-western state of Guerrero and their apparent murder by drug traffickers. The investigation of the case seems to have stalled. Mr Peña’s main policy response to the massacre is a proposed constitutional amendment to abolish municipal police forces. But Congress may not approve it, not least because some are less rotten than the state forces, which would take their place.

More, HERE.

Scandal in Mexico: A murky mortgage

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa Was a Crime of the State - See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Questions surround the purchase of a house owned by the finance minister

Dec 12th 2014

Mexico’s growing crisis: Reforms and democracy, but no rule of law

Nov 13th 2014

To save a promising presidency, Enrique Peña Nieto must tackle crime and corruption

From the print edition

DURING two years in office Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has received sharply contrasting reviews at home and abroad. Foreigners, including The Economist, have praised his structural reforms of the economy, which include an historic measure to open up energy to private investment (see article). Yet polls show that most Mexicans dislike Mr Peña. Among other things, they blame his government for a squeeze on living standards and the interlinked problems of violent crime and corruption. Sadly, recent events have lent support to Mr Peña’s domestic critics.

On November 8th Mexico’s attorney-general announced what almost everyone had already concluded: that 43 students from a teacher-training college in the southern state of Guerrero, who disappeared in the town of Iguala in late September, had been murdered by drug-traffickers after being kidnapped by the local police on the orders of the town’s mayor. Guerrero has been Mexico’s most violent state for centuries. The federal government bears no direct responsibility for these events. But Mexicans see in them a symbol of the failure of Mr Peña’s administration to make security a priority.

Now comes a problem that is uncomfortably close to home. The government had already opted to cancel a contract for a high-speed train that it had hastily awarded to the sole bidder, a consortium of Chinese and Mexican companies including a construction firm from the president’s home state. A local journalist has revealed that the boss of the same firm owns a $7m mansion that is the Peña family’s private residence (see article). The president denies any wrongdoing, but a common thread runs through these events.

Mexico only became a democracy in 2000, when seven decades of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the political machine that raised Mr Peña, were ended by electoral defeat. Unfortunately, democracy did not bring the rule of law to Mexico. Too many in the PRI still see the job of the police and the courts as enforcing political control, rather than investigating mobsters. Corrupt politicians are protected rather than punished. Organised crime and graft both remain a part of everyday life, and neither has been helped by the drugs flowing north to the United States.

More, HERE.
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Victims of Mexico’s drug war

Tracing the missing

Many thousands disappeared in Mexico’s drug war. The government should do more to find them

Mexico’s economy

Jam mañana

A frustrating start to the year

 

May 24th 2014 | MEXICO CITY | From the print edition

SO FAR this year Mexico’s government has resembled one of the country’s many devotees of St Jude, patron saint of lost causes. It has doggedly stuck to a 3.9% 2014 growth forecast, even though its main export market, the United States, has been sluggish, and the twin pillars of its domestic economy—buying and building—have fared even worse.

On May 21st the central bank revised its growth prediction down to 2.3-3.3%, from 3-4% previously. The government was expected finally to follow suit on May 23rd, when first-quarter GDP figures were due to be released. Even so, officials are convinced that within months the benefits of its plans to modernise the economy will start to show up in the numbers.

Mexicans have good reason to be sceptical.

More, HERE.

 

Copyright © The Economist Newspaper Limited 2013. All rights reserved.

The Guardian

Snowden voted person of the year


Edward Snowden
In May Edward Snowden flew to Hong Kong where he gave journalists the material which blew the lid on the extent of US digital spying. Photograph: The Guardian/AFP/Getty Images

 

For the second year in a row, a young American whistleblower alarmed at the unfettered and at times cynical deployment of power by the world's foremost superpower has been voted the Guardian's person of the year.

Edward Snowden, who leaked an estimated 200,000 files that exposed the extensive and intrusive nature of phone and internet surveillance and intelligence gathering by the US and its western allies, was the overwhelming choice of more than 2,000 people who voted.

The NSA whistleblower garnered 1,445 votes. In a distant second, from a list of 10 candidates chosen by Guardian writers and editors, came Marco Weber and Sini Saarela, the Greenpeace activists who spearheaded the oil rig protest over Russian Arctic drilling. They received 314 votes. Pope Francis gained 153 votes, narrowly ahead of blogger and anti-poverty campaigner Jack Monroe, who received 144.
Snowden's victory was as decisive as Chelsea Manning's a year earlier.

More, HERE.

© 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.

latimes.com

Click on HERE to get the latest Los Angeles Times News

Dismembered human body parts in suitcase, on streets in San Francisco

Woman found stabbed to death across the street from LAPD station

Los Angeles police Wednesday night were investigating a homicide after woman’s body was found across the street from the department’s Foothill Station in Pacoima.

New sex offender rules bulk up parole agents' caseloads

The new regimen further stretches California's already strained ability to oversee freed sex offenders. "This is hugely problematic," says the Parole Agents Assn. chief.

Driver turns himself in after girl dies in hit-and-run

Twin brothers charged in robbery, slaying of woman in South L.A.

5.7 earthquake strikes in Northern California

At Shooters Grill in Rifle, Colo., servers are packing heat

Unlike at Starbucks or Target, which have asked customers not to bring firearms into their stores, the gun-toting public is warmly welcomed here.

1961 convictions erased for 9 blacks who sat at whites-only lunch counter

No jail for former CHP officer who shared explicit photos of suspects

Justice nominee Loretta Lynch vows 'improved relationship' with Congress

Former Stanford swimmer accused of raping unconscious woman on campus

Maker of drone that crashed on White House grounds to stop flights over D.C.

UC Santa Barbara overwhelmingly white? Not anymore

Black sergeant sues San Diego Police Department over racist cartoon

Crossing guard struck, killed in Monterey Park

Mysterious shooting leaves one dead; wounded man shows up at hospital

Police are investigating a mysterious shooting at a Pasadena park Tuesday night. One man was found dead at the park, and a second man, with a gunshot wound, checked himself into a hospital hours later.

2 Israeli soldiers killed in attack near Lebanon

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MEXICO

Mexico officials conclude 'without a doubt' 43 students were killed

No charges for elderly homeowner who fatally shot burglar

LAPD statistics illustrate the 'nature of homicide in Los Angeles'

Thieves slam SUV into San Francisco museum, steal gold nuggets

Stocks take pounding on signs of economic weakness

Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger is no longer viewed as inevitable

Israel strikes back after 2 rockets from Syria hit Golan Heights

LAPD Chief Beck concerned traffic app Waze puts police in harm's way

L.A. Unified chief blasts teachers union's salary demands

Shooting at L.A.-area clinic: Nurse wounded, patient in custody

Santa Ana mother guilty of drowning baby daughter in bathtub

Earthquake: 3.4 quake strikes near Green Valley

A shallow magnitude 3.4 earthquake was reported Tuesday morning eight miles from Green Valley, Calif., according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 12:16 a.m. PST at a depth of 5.6 miles.

Suspects in stolen car chased across L.A. -- to LAPD headquarters

Man killed, boy wounded in food truck shooting

Man, 18, shot by campus police at El Camino College

West L.A., be aware: Joe Biden visit mucking up traffic today

Family of mother, son killed in condo fire asks for understanding

Four L.A. residents file class-action suits over DWP billing errors

Dodger Stadium attacker pleads guilty to federal weapons charge

Leading scientist warns that Ebola eradication may be elusive

House abortion bill switch reveals clout of GOP moderates

Suspects in stolen car chased across L.A. -- to LAPD headquarters

Teacher says students in alleged sex abuse should have kept 'stupid mouths shut'

Video of New Jersey police shooting fuels debate on use of force

Saudi king's successor is 80, meaning more change ahead

Alexandra Zavis and Carol J. Williams

As the new ruler, Salman ibn Abdul-Aziz is unlikely to shake things up. But one observer notes, 'This could be a prolonged era of leadership change.'

Gun-wielding man dies in downtown L.A. shooting

Police searching for cyclist who shot man in Rolls-Royce in Hollywood

California nurses call off strike against Kaiser

21 traumatized dogs taken from home, will have to learn 'how to be dogs'

Outcry after Indonesia executes 6 for drug trafficking

The Netherlands and Brazil respond angrily as Dutch and Brazilian nationals are among those put to death in Indonesia -- the first executions under new President Joko Widodo.

French Muslims resent scrutiny after Charlie Hebdo attack

Police capture teen 'Bonnie and Clyde' suspected in a trail of crime

Egypt's ban on Jewish festival is a reflection of nation's attitudes

French free 3 female suspects, find no direct role in attacks

Ontario airport worth less than L.A. is asking for, audit says

Copyright 2014

SPIEGEL ONLINE

Inside TAO: Documents Reveal Top NSA Hacking Unit

By SPIEGEL Staff

 

The article you are reading originally appeared in German in issue 1/2014 (December 30, 2013) of DER SPIEGEL.

 

Targeting Mexico

 

Mexico's Secretariat of Public Security, which was folded into the new National Security Commission at the beginning of 2013, was responsible at the time for the country's police, counterterrorism, prison system and border police. Most of the agency's nearly 20,000 employees worked at its headquarters on Avenida Constituyentes, an important traffic artery in Mexico City. A large share of the Mexican security authorities under the auspices of the Secretariat are supervised from the offices there, making Avenida Constituyentes a one-stop shop for anyone seeking to learn more about the country's security apparatus.

 

More, HERE.

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Fresh Leak on US Spying: NSA Accessed Mexican President's Email

By Jens Glüsing, Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

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'Royal Concierge': GCHQ Monitors Diplomats' Hotel Bookings

By Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

 

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Quantum Spying: GCHQ Used Fake LinkedIn Pages to Target Engineers

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Oil Espionage: How the NSA and GCHQ Spied on OPEC

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Belgacom Attack: Britain's GCHQ Hacked Belgian Telecoms Firm

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Cyber Attack: Belgians Angered by British Spying

© SPIEGEL ONLINE 2013, All Rights Reserved

Fox News

US intelligence assets in Mexico reportedly tied to murdered DEA agent

SCM's Travel Advisory:


September 11 attacks on World Trade Center by Wikipedia

Mexicans are advised to exercise MAXIMUM CAUTION, monitor developments that might affect your safety in the United States because of Hate Crimes. The FBI reports that hate crimes against Latinos rose almost 40 percent between 2003 and 2006, and Hispanic activists say they are being targeted with threats and intimidation.

This is just a recent incident: STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- A rash of recent assaults on Mexican immigrants has heightened tensions in Port Richmond, already on edge following the savage beating of a 25-year-old baker earlier this (April 2010) month.

In addition, no matter what your nationality the US in under permanent risk of terrorism. Visitors could be caught up in attacks targeted at American, British, Canadian, Australian citizens, others. Terrorists may attack official or civilian targets. Crime rates are higher in the larger cities, such as New York, Los Angeles and Chicago.

 

Many parts of the United States are subject to different natural hazards, including earthquakes, fires or wildfires, floods, extreme heat, hurricanes, landslides and debris flow (mudslides), thunderstorms and lightning, tornadoes, tsunamis, volcanoes (Hawaii, Alaska and Pacific Northwest), winter storms (freezing rain, heavy snow and blizzards) and extreme cold.

 

Tourists are often targeted for petty crimes such as pick-pocketing and theft, particularly on public transport. It is recommended that before visiting your destination point, Google it and write NAME OF CITY TO BE VISITED, then "crime, areas to be avoided & gang activities" to determine your level of threat.  

Come Back Alive, a site dedicated to Dangerous Countries writes on quote: 

"There are more than 200 million guns in the possession of Americans. Most violent acts in the States are the result of robberies, domestic disputes and drug-related violence.

 

Terrorist acts, ranging from the killing of abortionist doctors to the bombing of the World Trade Center, are highly publicized but not considered a real threat to travelers. The threat of robbery or violent crime in inner cities and some tourist areas is real and should be taken seriously. Travel in America is considered safe (by .. Americans), and danger is confined to random violence and inner cities.

 

Those seeking adventure can find it in a New Orleans bar at five in the morning or strolling through South Central L.A. after midnight." .. 

TRAVEL ADVISORY: The Southern Poverty Law Center counted 932 active hate groups in the United States in 2009. Only organizations and their chapters known to be active during 2009 are included. More, HERE.

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Oct. 29, 2009 Washington Post: Obama signs hate crimes law

You Tube

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HATE CRIMES


RACISM AND ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION, by ABC News

MEXICAN HATE RALLY

The New Sport: Latino Hate Crime, ABC News

Mexican beaten by 3 racist Blacks on Staten Island, New York

US Border Patrol Agent Shoots Dead Mexican Teen on Mexican Soil

Border agent details immigrant abuse

Discrimination Against Latinos

American Heritage- KKK Lynching

 

Redneck Attacks Mexican flag

 

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TERRORISM, DRUGS

New report exposes CIA torture & rendition by Nick Harper

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MUST-READ Book: Cocaine Politics by Peter Dale Scott

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Drugs and the Economy - Peter Dale Scott

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Gary Webb on C.I.A. Trafficking of Cocaine

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CIA Torture Jet crashed with 4 Tons of COCAINE

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Former LA Police Officer Mike Ruppert Confronts CIA Director

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'I don't think drug trafficking will ever be stopped': Inside the world of the U.S. agent who went undercover with the cartels:

Mail Online, UK

--------------------------------

Celerino Castillo, by Wikipedia

Powderburns

------------------

Marijuana legalization wins majority support in poll: Los Angeles Times

Marijuana, Officially Legal in Colorado

In 2006, former Mexican president Felipe Calderón launched a massive crackdown against drug trafficking organizations, in conjunction with the United States. Since then, more than 40,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence: 

-----------------------------

Council On Foreign Relations

Washington State Gears Up for Marijuana Industry: Voice of America

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Marijuana Legalization Canada: Liberal Party Lays Out Detailed Economic Plan For Pot: The Huffington Post, Canada

-------------------------------------------------

England Wants To Legalize Marijuana Through Cannabis Drug Reform: Inquisitr. Ltd.

More HERE.

A change of scenery by Washington Post

U.S. citizens traveling internationally in 2012, by destination

 

A change of scenery
Source: Office of Travel and Tourism Industries, Commerce Department. The Washington Post. Published on May 24, 2013

Image Credit

Mexico Travel Warning

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling to certain places in Mexico due to threats to safety and security posed by organized criminal groups in the country.
U.S. citizens have been the target of violent crimes, such as kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery by organized criminal groups in various Mexican states.  For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, which can vary, travelers should reference the state-by-state assessments further below.  This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.
General Conditions: 

Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year for study, tourism, and business, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day.  The Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations, and there is no evidence that organized criminal groups have targeted U.S. visitors or residents based on their nationality.  Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that are reported in the border region or in areas along major trafficking routes. 

Nevertheless, U.S. travelers should be aware that the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter organized criminal groups that engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico.  The groups themselves are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity.  Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur anywhere.  U.S. citizens have fallen victim to criminal activity, including homicide, gun battles, kidnapping, carjacking, and highway robbery.  While many of those killed in organized crime-related violence have themselves been involved in criminal activity, innocent persons have also been killed.  The number of U.S. citizens reported to the Department of State as murdered in Mexico was 71 in 2012 and 81 in 2013. 

Gun battles between rival criminal organizations or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico.  Gun battles have occurred in broad daylight on streets and in other public venues, such as restaurants and clubs.  During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily prevented from leaving the area. Criminal organizations have used stolen cars, buses, and trucks to create roadblocks on major thoroughfares, preventing the military and police from responding to criminal activity. The location and timing of future armed engagements is unpredictable.  We recommend that you defer travel to the areas specifically identified in this Travel Warning and exercise extreme caution when traveling throughout the other areas for which advisories are in effect.

The number of kidnappings throughout Mexico is of particular concern and appears to be on the rise.  According to statistics published by the Mexican Secretaria de Gobernacion (SEGOB), in 2013 kidnappings nationwide increased 20 percent over the previous year.  While kidnappings can occur anywhere, according to SEGOB, during this timeframe, the states with the highest numbers of kidnappings were Tamaulipas, Guerrero, Michoacán, Estado de Mexico, and Morelos.

Additionally, according to a widely publicized study by the agency responsible for national statistics (INEGI, the National Institute of Statistics and Geography), Mexico suffered an estimated 105,682 kidnappings in 2012; only 1,317 were reported to the police.  Police have been implicated in some of these incidents.  Both local and expatriate communities have been victimized.  Nearly 70 kidnappings of U.S. citizens were reported to the U.S. Embassy and consulates in Mexico between January and June of 2014.

U.S. citizens are encouraged to lower their personal profiles and to avoid displaying indicators of wealth such as expensive or expensive-looking jewelry, watches, or cameras.  U.S. citizens are encouraged to maintain awareness of their surroundings and avoid situations in which they may be isolated or stand out as potential victims.

Kidnappings in Mexico have included traditional, "express," and "virtual" kidnappings. Victims of traditional kidnappings are physically abducted and held captive until a ransom is paid for release.  "Express" kidnappings are those in which a victim is abducted for a short time and forced to withdraw money, usually from an ATM, then released.  A "virtual" kidnapping is an extortion-by-deception scheme wherein a victim is contacted by phone and convinced to isolate themselves from family and friends until a ransom is paid.  The victim is coerced (by threat of violence) to remain isolated and to provide phone numbers for the victim's family or loved ones.  The victim's family is then contacted and a ransom for the "kidnapped" extracted.  Recently, some travelers to Mexico staying at hotels as guests have been targets of such "virtual" kidnapping schemes.
Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments.  U.S. government personnel are specifically prohibited from patronizing these establishments in the states of Coahuila, Durango, Zacatecas, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosi, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas.

Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the border region, and U.S. citizens have been murdered in such incidents.  Most victims who complied with carjackers' demands have reported that they were not physically harmed.

Carjackers have shot at vehicles that have attempted to flee.  Incidents have occurred during the day and at night, and carjackers have used a variety of techniques, including roadblocks, bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop, and running vehicles off the road at high speeds.  There are indications that criminals target newer and larger vehicles, especially dark-colored SUVs.  However, even drivers of old sedans and buses coming from the United States have been targeted.  While violent incidents can occur anywhere and at any time, they most frequently occur at night and on isolated roads.  To reduce risk when traveling by road, we strongly urge you to travel between cities throughout Mexico only during daylight hours, to avoid isolated roads, and to use toll roads ("cuotas") whenever possible. 

The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat organized criminal groups.  U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways by car or bus may encounter government checkpoints, staffed by military or law enforcement personnel.  In some places, criminal organizations have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and have killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them.  You should cooperate at all checkpoints. 

The Department imposes restrictions on U.S. government employees' travel in Mexico.  Since July 2010, USG employees are prohibited from driving on non-official travel from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior of Mexico or Central America.  One exception is that personal travel by motor vehicle is permitted on Highway 15 toll road between Hermosillo and Nogales during daylight hours.
U.S. government personnel and their families are prohibited from personal travel to all areas to which it is advised to "defer non-essential travel".  When travel for official purposes is essential, it is conducted with extensive security precautions.  U.S. government personnel and their families are allowed to travel for personal reasons to the areas where no advisory is in effect or where the advisory is to exercise caution.  While the general public is not forbidden from visiting places categorized under "defer non-essential travel," U.S. government personnel will not be able to respond quickly to an emergency situation in those areas due to security precautions that must be taken by U.S. government personnel to travel to those areas. 

For more information on road safety and crime along Mexico's roadways, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information

State-by-State Assessment: 

Below is a state-by-state assessment of security conditions throughout Mexico.  Travelers should be mindful that even if no advisories are in effect for a given state, crime and violence can still occur.  For general information about travel and other conditions in Mexico, see our Country Specific Information.

More, HERE

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The New York Times

From Frommer's

Introduction to Mexico
The Best Cultural Experiences
The Best Beach Vacations
The Best Active Vacations
The Best Places to Get Away from It All
Getting There
Getting Around
Fast Facts
In One Week
In Two Weeks

 

MEXICO POPULAR DESTINATIONS

See All 37 Destinations

Acapulco

Baja California

Cabo San Lucas

Campeche

Cancun

Chichen Itza

Colima

Mexico City

Yucatan Peninsula

MORE MEXICO TRAVEL, HERE.

© 2013 The New York Times Company

The Naturalization Process and Current Trends in Immigration in the United States: By Gender, By Age and By Marital Status

In 2011, the total number of persons naturalizing was 694,193. The leading countries of birth of new citizens were Mexico (94,783), India (45,985), the Philippines (42,520), the People's Republic of China (32,864), and Colombia (22,693). The largest number of persons naturalizing lived in California (151,183), Florida (87,309), and New York (76,603).

Historical trends have shown that the average number of persons that are naturalized annually has increased from less than 120,000 during the 1950s and 1960s to 210,000 during the 1980s, to 500,000 during the 1990s, and to 680,000 between 2000 and 2009. Naturalizations rose sharply during the mid-1990s because of various factors that include: 1) the 2.7 million undocumented immigrants legalized under the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 making them eligible for citizenship; 2) legislative efforts to restrict public benefits for non-citizens; and 3) the implementation of a mandatory program requiring replacement of permanent resident cards issued before 1977.

More, HERE.

 

Information submitted to Security Corner in Mexico by Cooper Brimm, American Immigration Center

16 Ways to Get Through the Airport Faster

With airports that seem busier than ever, airline staffing reductions creating longer lines at check-in and airport security wait times that can be entirely unpredictable, these days the old airport "two-hour" rule often leaves just minutes to spare to buy a magazine, grab a snack or hustle your kids into the bathroom. Saving a few extra minutes here and there along the way can add up in your favor; here are 16 tips to get you from your front door to your seat on the plane as quickly and painlessly as possible -- as well as some ideas to keep you moving no matter what is going on with your flight.

More, HERE

© 2013 The Independent Traveler, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

15 Travel Tips to Get Through TSA Security


The savviest of travelers understand the security requirements and plan ahead. In the United States, airport security is run by the Transportation Security Administration, a division of the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees border security as well as technological research, response to national disasters and terrorism, and intelligence analysis.

 

These tips reflect TSA policies as of November 2012. And for students enrolled in a homeland security program, knowing this information is vital and applicable to your future career.

 

More, HERE.

© 2013, Master of Homeland Security

COMMUNITY NEWS

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¿DE VISITA EN LA CIUDAD DE MEXICO, D. F.?

 

Panadería La Espiga


INSURGENTES SUR 455, HIPODROMO CONDESA, CUAUHTEMOC, C.P. 06170, DF. Tel: (55)5564-7763

"Ir al metro Chilpancingo es una de mis aventuras favoritas porque puedo visitar la panadería La Espiga. Este lugar lleva más de veinte años en el mismo lugar y tiene cosas deliciosas que ofrecer. Su tamaño es enorme, y dentro puedes encontrar comida, refrescos y bebidas, postres, entre otras cosas. El primer pasillo tiene papas y comida chatarra que puedes consumir. El segundo pasillo tiene todos los refrescos y las aguas al tiempo, en el fondo podrás encontrar los refrigeradores que tienen los refrescos y aguas frías, así como hielo". Más, AQUI.

 

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¿DE VISITA EN ZIPOLITE, OAXACA?

Restaurante La Pasión by Trip Advisor

La PasiOn

Jaime Díaz Arguelles
La Pasión, Col. Roca Blanca
Tel. no. 9581091824
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Restaurante El Alquimista by Trip Advisor

Marisquería, Pasta & Pizza

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Autos con 15 Años de Antiguedad Dejarán de Circular en el D. F. Dos Veces a la Semana

http://www.solucionpolitica.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/hoy-no-circula.jpg

CREDITO DE LA IMAGEN: SOLUCION POLITICA

 

Cars Older than 15 Years will not circulate twice a Week
Tanya Müller García
Tanya Muller García, Secretaria del Medio Ambiente del Distrito Federal

 

Mexico City's Environment Secretariat

HOY NO CIRCULA

New Program of (Your Car) Does not Circulate in Mexico City. More information, HERE by Wikipedia

S P E C I A L   A N N O U N C E M E N T
Olivier Tschumi
Olivier Tschumi, a Swiss citizen, relocated to Mexico 22 years ago. He was kidnapped while jogging with his two dogs in a park north of Cuernavaca in the morning of December 19, 2010. A ransom was paid to the kidnappers on December 21 of same year, but Olivier continues to be in captivity to this date. Authorities have no leads to the kidnappers.

Security Corner in Mexico has been requested by Mr. Tschumi's family in Switzerland to have this information available to our readers in the event you happen to know or hear of Olivier's whereabouts. The Mexican Federal Attorney General's Office (PGR) is offering $5 million pesos as a reward to anybody providing information that will lead to the whereabouts of Mr. Tschumi

If you have any information, please write to Olivier's sister ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). Olivier has a 12-year old waiting to hear from you too. More information, in Spanish HERE
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Olivier Tschumi, citoyen suisse, s'est installé au Mexique il y a 22 ans. Au matin du 19 décembre 2010,  Il a été enlevé  lors d'un jogging avec ses deux chiens dans une forêt au nord de Cuernavaca. Une rançon a été payée selon les exigences des ravisseurs le 21 décembre de la même année. Olivier n'a pas été libéré, il a disparu depuis ce jour. L'enquête, menée par les  autorités mexicaines piétine.  Désespérée, la famille Tschumi en Suisse implore l'aide de tout le monde pour retrouver Olivier. Toute information concernant les ravisseurs et  sa localisation sera utile et  bienvenue. La famille d'Olivier a grand besoin de votre aide et vous remercie.

Le Bureau du procureur général fédéral mexicain offre $ 5.000.000 pesos en récompense à qui fournira des informations conduisant à retrouver Monsieur Tschumi. Si vous avez des informations, s'il vous plaît écrivez à la sœur d'Olivier, Email:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Olivier a une fille de 12 ans qui espère retrouver son papa grâce à votre aide! Plus d'informations en espagnol ICI

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Culture of Safe Travel, Crime & Loss Prevention

 

VIDEOS

 

INTRODUCTION (English language) 

INTRODUCCION A ESQUINA DE LA SEGURIDAD


PREVENTING KIDNAPPING EXPRESS IN MEXICO CITY

MEXICO CITY SUBWAY SYSTEM, SAFE, EFFICIENT, INEXPENSIVE


WORDS OF ADVISE FROM SUBWAY SECURITY PERSONNEL

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Mexico City Hash House Harriers

INTERNATIONAL DRINKING Jarra CLUB WITH A RUNNING PROBLEM

www.mchhh.com

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www.mchhh.com

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SOCIAL SERVICES

 

Cuernavaca's Center for Happy Sr. Citizens, contributing to the enhancement of life quality. Monday to Friday: 8AM to 14:00 hrs. Among other courses specially designed for the elderly: literature, history, philosophy, IT, English, Spanish, artistic workshops: music, painting, cuisine, manual art; sports and entertainment: dancing, zumba, danzon, yoga, aqua-aerobics, reading. Emotions' handling, conferences, legal advise for inheritance, tanatology.

More information: Río Amacuzac 435, Col. Vistahermosa, tels. (01- 777) 221-6250(01- 777) 221-6250 (01- 777) 221-6250Contact person: Alejandra Morales Leija

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American Benevolent Society

 

American Benevolent Society Newsletter by American_Benevolent

Paseo de la Reforma 1870-201 Lomas de Chapultepec, Miguel Hidalgo. Mexico, D.F. 11000 Mexico

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B E W A R E

New fines in the D.F. as of the first of January, 2015


1.- $1,290 pesos for failing to "verificar" the car plus $790.00 to get the ¨"verification" (smog emission test)

2.- THIS IS BIG - $12,000 FOR USE OF A CELL PHONE.  DON'T EVEN HAVE IT IN YOUR HAND.

3.- $700 for not using your seatbelt, even the back seat.

4.- $2,500 for expired plates plus the cost of the renewal.

5. You don't have to pay registration on brand new cars.

6. $18,000 fine if you hit someone in an enebriated condition plus 3-9 years in jail.

7.- $3,500 if you are stopped and fail to pass the alcohol test.

8.- $1,500 for playing the radio at more than 50 decibeles.

9.- PLEASE SHARE THIS INFORMATION


Best wishes.  

Remember that as an foreigner there are very strict limits to participation in political activities.  When in doubt, don't.

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New "HOY NO CIRCULA" rules go into effect Tuesday, July 1, 2014‏

Here's an explanation of how the new program "hoy no circula" works, starting TUESDAY, July 1st

 

If you have any information that is different from this PLEASE let us know right away so we can send it out. Brand new vehicles that have the hologram 00 are able to drive for two years, the car will have to update the hologram  at the expiration date and be inspected . You have two months after the expiration date to renew the hologram (have the car inspected).
Hologram 0, if your vehicle does not pass the 00 you will be given the hologram 0.  You can still drive everyday of the month, but instead of the two years permit, the expiration is set for six months, then you will have to renew the hologram. For information on the dates of the renewal, the link of the government will be posted at the end of the mail.
Hologram 1, this hologram is usually for vehicles between 9 and 15 years of usage. the vehicles with the hologram number 1 will not be able to circulate two Saturdays a month and one day on midweek. (the Saturday depends on the license plate of the car, see the government link for more details) and one day on midweek that also depends on the license plate of the car.

And there will be the new hologram 2.

 

According to the news of El Universal vehicles with the hologram number 2 that are over 15 years in circulation will not be able to circulate any Saturday of the month and also one day midweek.

 

It seems that the government is willing to change the hologram 2 for the hologram 1 if the vehicles pass the regulation test. This regulation will start on Tuesday July 1st. of 2014.  For more details here is the link of the news. And here is the link for the government program "Hoy no circula"

 

Talking history: The American Benevolent Society turns 140 by Catherine Dunn, Insidemex

 

History

Oprima ESTE ENLACE electrónico para ver las noticias actualizadas de México de CNN en Español de esta fecha

La explosión en un hospital pone "en pánico" al DF

Desde las primeras horas de este jueves, el estallido de una pipa de gas movilizó a las autoridades y dejó tres muertos y más de 70 heridos Ir a la nota

La ONU evaluará a México por desapariciones forzadas

La organización informó que sostendrá un diálogo por primera vez sobre el tema con una delegación mexicana el 2 y 3 de febrero en Ginebra Ir a la nota

OPINIÓN: ¡Ya basta de lucrar con el caso Ayotzinapa!

"No podemos aceptar nada": Padres de Ayotzinapa

"¿Quieren tu voto? Exígeles transparencia"

Con #3de3, Transparencia Mexicana llama a los ciudadanos a que exijan a sus candidatos declaración patrimonial, de intereses y de impuestos Ir a la nota

Peña no ha enfrentado sus problemas: 'The Economist'

La competencia entre partidos se cierra: encuesta

Últimas noticias

Castro pide en la CELAC que termine el embargo de EU

Calderón y Horcasitas, en 'amargo' enfrentamiento

Expresidente de Panamá, investigado por corrupción

Soriana acuerda comprar Comercial Mexicana por 39,194 mdp CNNExpansión

Jordania se prepara para acatar la demanda de ISIS video

EU registra un 'boom' de petróleo con Obama

OPINIÓN: La verdad sobre la seguridad fronteriza

Michelle Obama saludó de mano al nuevo rey saudí, ¿y?

Los 'chapulines' políticos inician su carrera para brincar a otro cargo

Guerrilla de Sudán del Sur liberará 3,000 niños

La violencia regresa a Israel por pugna con Hezbollah

McDonald's despide a su CEO CNNExpansión

La 'gran tormenta' no llegó a Nueva York fotogaleria

¿Quiénes protagonizarán 'Las cazafantasmas'?

Luis Figo, uno más que busca presidir a la FIFA video

Autores de 'Frozen' escriben para el Oscar 2014, el año en que más se gastó en futbolistas

Amazon, lista para competir con Hollywood

Ronaldo, suspendido dos partidos por patada a Edimar

Abril, el mes en que veremos al Apple Watch

Video

Ayotzinapa, vínculos corruptos y poder políticoVideo

Intercambio de rehenes entre gobiernos y radicalesVideo

'Yo consumí LSD con Steve Jobs', dice excompañeroVideo

Castro pide en la CELAC que cese el embargo de EUVideo

Psicópatas no aprenden de castigos, según estudioVideo

Descubren un planeta con enorme sistema de anillosVideo

Los cambios al servicio de inteligencia argentinoVideo

Exasesor de Nisman dice que su jefe quería un armaVideo

¿Qué hace un 'oso' en las calles de Londres?Video

Estado debe cambiar actitud tras caso Iguala: CNDH

Nacional

Diputados piden a PGR investigar fallas en Línea 12

Conagua vigilará el agua del río Sonora por 5 años

Gobierno debe cambiar actitud tras caso Iguala: CNDHVideo

La PGJDF precisa en 1.2 mdd el robo a Saks FifithVideo

Reparar la L-12 ha costado 1,163 mdp... y contando

Pruebas de ADN confirman identidad de Moisés Sánchez

La PGJDF difunde video del asalto a joyería SaksVideo

"No aceptaremos su verdad": padres de normalistasVideo

El IPN creará defensoría de derechos individuales

Mundo

ISIS fija fecha límite para intercambiar prisionero

11 datos sobre el pasado y presente de Auschwitz

Castro pide en la CELAC que termine el embargo de EUVideo

Guerrilla de Sudán del Sur liberará 3,000 niños

Kim Jong Un visitará Rusia en mayo

Nueva York se preparó, y la gran tormenta no llegóFotogalería

Violencia regresa a Israel por pugna con Hezbollah

© 2006 Derechos Reservados Expansión, S.A. DE C.V.

El Universal has no official political affiilation and is the most read newspaper in Mexico

Oprima AQUI para ver noticias actualizadas del periódico El Universal

IN ENGLISH

Their lawyer and lawyer demanded the continuation of the investigation and results based on scientific evidence.    

The official position expressed by the Office of the Attorney General (PGR), implying that the Ayotzinapa students missing since September 26 were killed and burned was rejected by the spokesperson and the lawyer of their parents.

"We will never accept the version of the Attorney General," expressed Felipe de la Cruz in an interview with Paola Rojas for media conglomerate Radio Fórmula.

More, HERE

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ESPAÑOL

Metrópoli

Deja explosión en hospital 3 muertos

Una fuerte explosión por acumulación de gas provocó que se viniera abajo 70% del Hospital Materno Infantil de Cuajimalpa, del que quedaron reducidos a escombros el área de cuneros, emergencias y la cocina

Escenas conmocionan al mundo

La gasera que cuenta con un pasado oscuro

Peña Nieto respalda al GDF por explosión

Editorial EL UNIVERSAL Una historia conocida

Gráfico Resultado de una mala operación

Mapa Vista aérea, antes y después

Especial Arde pipa frente a Hospital Materno

Video Difunden video del momento en que explota pipa afuera de hospital

Metrópoli

El heroísmo en medio de la tragedia

Apenas se enteró de la explosión en el Hospital Materno Infantil de Cuajimalpa, el policía Enrique Mauro Vera Suárez dejó su puesto en la jefatura delegacional. Fue de los primeros en llegar a Contadero, corrió hasta el área de los cuneros, tomó en brazos a una recién nacida y salió en busca de un paramédico que la asistiera. La bebé falleció por un traumatismo craneoencefálico. Esta es una de las tantas historias que se vivieron ayer

"El miedo olía a gas, como en el sismo del 85"

"No sabemos dónde están algunas personas"

Andrea, un milagro que se aferra a la vida

Le faltaban 50 minutos para terminar su turno

Viven horas de angustia

Galería Sociedad civil colabora tras explosión en Cuajimalpa

Galería El rostro de la tragedia del hospital de Cuajimalpa

Video Niños fueron los primeros en ayudar tras explosión en hospital

Video Sobreviviente de la explosión de hospital narra la tragedia

Testimonios ¿Cómo lo vivieron?

Nación

Posan para la foto... se prometen café

Panistas acuerdan dejar atrás desencuentros. Lozano: "funciono mejor con diálogo y respeto"

Aplauden al político nato... a Camacho Solís Indigna Encinas a "Chuchos" y se van

Cultura

Murales de Montenegro, dañados en restauración

Los técnicos de la empresa quitaron colores de la superficie de ambas obras, ubicadas en el Parque México

Gráfico El trote errático del Caballito

Nación

PGR interrogará al director de la Normal de Ayotzinapa

MP "invita" a comparecer al maestro, al seguir investigación. José Luis Hernández dice que no ha recibido citatorio

"PF actuó apegada a protocolos en detención de normalistas"

En Guerrero se hará respetar la ley: Osorio

Miniverdad, versión de PGR de caso Iguala: PAN

PRD: pese a Ayotzinapa, en Guerrero avanzamos

Robles: ya basta de impunidad

Video Padres rechazan versión de la PGR sobre normalistas

Video Normalistas, incinerados y arrojados al río: PGR

Metrópoli

El GDF arma campaña en mi contra, acusa Ebrard

Metrópoli

El GDF arma campaña en mi contra, acusa Ebrard

Deportes

Habrá vigilancia especial para los 108 balones del Super Bowl

Nación

Sugieren un presidente distinto para CJF y Corte

De no existir previa autorización, queda expresamente prohibida la publicación, retransmisión, edición y cualquier otro uso de los contenidos de El Universal



Proceso is a weekly magazine, renowned for its left-wing journalism

Oprima AQUI para ver las noticias actualizadas de la revista Proceso de esta fecha

Fallece otra bebé por explosión; van tres muertos y 73 heridos

“Háblale a los bomberos, no se puede tapar la fuga…”

La PGJDF abre indagatoria por homicidio y lesiones culposas

Gas Express Nieto: historial de tragedias

Notas Destacadas

Desalojan a 2 mil 300 personas por fuga de amoniaco en Celaya

CELAYA, Gto. (apro).- Una fuga de amoniaco originada en la empresa procesadora de alimentos Sigma, localizada en la ciudad industrial, generó pánico y movilización de …

Incumple Peña con investigación y búsqueda de miles de desaparecidos: ONG

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Organizaciones civiles que asistirán al octavo periodo de sesiones del Comité contra las Desapariciones Forzadas de la ONU, el próximo 2 y …

Parlamento Europeo duda que Peña reduzca niveles de violencia en el largo plazo

BRUSELAS (apro).- Un estudio del área de análisis del Parlamento Europeo, el cual comenzó a circular este jueves entre eurodiputados, considera que “es incierto” que …

Recibe el IFAI 18 nuevos casos contra Google México

HERMOSILLO, Son. (apro).- El Instituto Federal de Acceso a la Información (IFAI) recibió 18 peticiones para que Google México retire los datos personales de los …

Nacional

Por falta de prevención y verificación, aumentan accidentes de gaseras: experto

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Los accidentes provocados por empresas gaseras …

Juez rechaza demanda de Cassez contra Calderón, García Luna y Televisa

MÉXICO, D.F., (apro).- El juez Segundo de Distrito en …

Ebrard evalúa sumarse a Morena

MÉXICO, D.F., (proceso.com.mx).- El exjefe de gobierno del Distrito …

Estados

Arrojan bombas molotov a instalaciones de El Heraldo de Córdoba

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- La madrugada de este jueves la …

Antimotines arremeten contra extrabajadores de Oceanografía; 37 detenidos

CD. DEL CARMEN, Cam. (apro).- Antimotines arremetieron anoche contra …

Dan formal prisión a expolicía implicado en homicidio de periodista

 

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Un juez dictó auto de formal …
PROCESO 1995

Edición 1995; 24 de Enero, 2015

Violencia Social

Expediente Tlatlaya Encubrimiento militar


24 de enero de 2015
El martes 13, el ómbudsman nacional, Luis Raúl González Pérez, declaró que en Tlatlaya hubo violaciones graves a los derechos humanos y abrió al público el voluminoso expediente de la PGR en el que se menciona a los generales …

IFAI: Que Sedena informe sobre civiles retenidos


24 de enero de 2015
Invocando el “interés público” y el “derecho a la verdad”, el pleno del Instituto Federal de Acceso a la Información y Protección de Datos (IFAI) instruyó a la Secretaría de la Defensa Nacional (Sedena) para dar a conocer “la …

Guerrero: el riesgo de ser sacerdote


24 de enero de 2015
En Ciudad Altamirano las bandas criminales se han ensañado con el clero, igual que con el resto de la gente. Tras el asesinato de cuatro sacerdotes, sus compañeros ya consideran la zona como una “tierra de misión”, donde su …

Carrera entre precandidatos sospechosos


24 de enero de 2015
La mayoría de los alcaldes y diputados locales que aspiran a participar en las próximas elecciones en Guerrero han sido señalados por tener presuntos nexos con la delincuencia organizada. …

Desarman las acusaciones contra Nestora


24 de enero de 2015
Los defensores de la comandante de la policía comunitaria de Olinalá, Guerrero, Nestora Salgado García, confían en el que fiscal general del estado, Miguel Ángel Godínez Muñoz, se desista de la acusación para que ella recupere la libertad. El …

Caso Regina Martínez


24 de enero de 2015
Mil días de impunidad El homicidio de Regina Martínez Pérez, la corresponsal de Proceso en Veracruz, está lejos de ser esclarecido y se ve remota la posibilidad de castigar a los verdaderos responsables. …

Ayotzinapa

Policías detenidos, chivos expiatorios


24 de enero de 2015
El repudio nacional por el ataque contra los estudiantes de Ayotzinapa provocó una respuesta gubernamental lenta y sumamente criticada. Ahora, nuevas voces se suman al rechazo: familiares de policías municipales detenidos por el atentado explican que los agentes acusados …

Los desenterradores anónimos


24 de enero de 2015
Ninguneados por las autoridades, relegados siempre, los parientes de los desaparecidos también eran invisibles. Nadie los escuchaba, nadie los atendía. La brutalidad y la proyección del ataque contra los estudiantes de Ayotzinapa, empero, removió su dolor y provocó que …

Estados

Un desastre, la herencia del virrey


24 de enero de 2015
El año en el cual Alfredo Castillo asumió plenos poderes en Michoacán arroja un oscuro balance. Diversos sectores sociales reclaman la forma en que fue nombrado por el presidente, los nudos que hizo cuando pretendió destejer la trama del …

Política

Después de Iguala, nada será igual


24 de enero de 2015
Alejandro Encinas, militante izquierdista desde los tiempos del Partido Comunista, renunció al PRD, del cual es fundador. En entrevista el aún senador y exjefe de gobierno capitalino hace un retrato certero del sol azteca, a su juicio completamente corrompido, …

Politica PAN

En el pleito panista, Madero aniquila a Calderón


24 de enero de 2015
Felipe Calderón critica en Gustavo Madero, el presidente del PAN, lo que él ejerció cuando estuvo en Los Pinos: su poder unipersonal, y hasta amenaza con abandonar el partido –como declaró en entrevista desde Davos, Suiza, la semana pasada– …

Estados

Un triunvirato en el gobierno


24 de enero de 2015
En 2009 un médico priista vio la oportunidad de convertirse en gobernador y no la desperdició. Pero la administración de Fernando Toranzo ha sido una de las peores que se recuerden en San Luis Potosí. Extendió patente de corso …

Adicciones

Arizona sucumbe a la heroína mexicana


24 de enero de 2015
La heroína mexicana del Cártel de Sinaloa se convirtió en una “epidemia mortal” en Estados Unidos. En algunas zonas, hasta 20% de los jóvenes son adictos a esa droga, se asienta en el documental Enganchados, producido por la Universidad …

Internacional

La enigmática muerte del fiscal Nisman


24 de enero de 2015
Mientras más se indaga en la muerte del fiscal argentino Alberto Nisman, más dudas surgen. Apareció el domingo 11 con un balazo en la cabeza dentro de su departamento, tres días después de que pidió indagar a la presidenta …

La última víctima de la AMIA


24 de enero de 2015
Buenos Aires.- El 18 de julio de 1994, Ana María Czyzewski llegó a la sede de la Asociación Mutual Israelita Argentina (AMIA) junto con su hija Paola. Era la primera vez que la joven de 21 años acompañaba a …

En la “euromiseria” crece la izquierda


24 de enero de 2015
Las medidas de ajuste impuestas por la Unión Europea a algunos de sus integrantes –Chipre, Portugal, Irlanda, España y Grecia– afectan, como siempre, a quienes menos tienen. En este último país las escenas de miseria se multiplican en sectores …

Cita para la próxima matanza


24 de enero de 2015
Amenazado de muerte por la mafia desde la publicación en 2007 de su primer libro, Gomorra, y autor de Cero, cero, cero (2013) sobre el tráfico mundial de cocaína, con particular énfasis en México, Roberto Saviano lleva siete años …

Más, AQUI.

Proceso 1994
Edición 1994; 17 de Enero, 2015

PROCESO 1993

Edición 1993; 10 de Enero, 2015

PROCESO 1991

Edición 1991; 27 de Diciembre, 2014

PROCESO 1990

Edición 1990; 20 de Diciembre, 2014

PROCESO 1988

The Mexican government, welcomed as a partner of the Canadian and U.S. governments in continental economic development and security, also happens to partner in the slaughter of its own people. The murders and disappearances of the students from the Rural Normal “Raúl Isidro Burgos,” of Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, Mexico on September 26, 2014 in Iguala, was a crime of the state, as hundreds of thousands of Mexicans have claimed in their protests.
The governmental investigation that followed the September 2014 attack on these students has been deliberately incompetent and not aimed at getting to the roots of the crime that are, in fact, the tangled web of state-drug gang corruption and the state’s dirty war in defense of the neoliberal transformation of Mexico. The investigation has been staged, quite ineffectively, as a public relations operation to calm foreign investors and to cool protests, efforts that have completely failed within Mexico. By claiming that the blame was at the local level (the corrupt collusion of a local mayor and his avaricious wife with a brutal cartel) the national government seeks to present itself as the defender of justice.
But as Luis Hernández Navarro shows in his article “La matanza de Iguala y el Ejército” (The Iguala Massacre and the Army), there is—and has long been—a deep entanglement between the army, the local government of Iguala, and drug production. Guerrero  accounts for more than 60% of the Mexican production of poppies and opium gum for making heroin, and the cities of Iguala and Chilpancingo are key centers for its storage and transportation.
- See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa Was a Crime of the State

- See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Edición 1988; 6 de Diciembre, 2014

© 2013 Proceso

 

 

 

Last Updated on Friday, 30 January 2015 07:54
 
Don Julio Scherer Garcia, Crusading Journalist, Died Wednesday At The Age Of 88: Proceso, The Newsmagazine He Founded; Guerrero State Governor Has Asked Prosecutors To Drop Kidnap Charges Against US Vigilante; Who's In Charge In Michoacan ?....
Thursday, 18 December 2014 11:28

Best Wishes in 2015/Nuestros Mejores Deseos en 2015

Frog








 

 

 

Image Credit

 

Mario González-Román

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The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners - Public Service

For a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper or news site through the use of its journalistic resources, including the use of stories, editorials, cartoons, photographs, graphics, videos, databases, multimedia or interactive presentations or other visual material, a gold medal. Awarded to The Washington Post for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security. and Awarded to The Guardian US for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, helping through aggressive reporting to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.

Finalists also nominated as a finalist in this category was Newsday, Long Island, N.Y., for its use of in-depth reporting and digital tools to expose shootings, beatings and other concealed misconduct by some Long Island police officers, leading to the formation of a grand jury and an official review of police accountability.

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INTERNATIONAL

3 days of terror shook a nation to its core

The attacks were a wake-up call to the dangerous currents of radical thought among a susceptible minority who live as outsiders in their own society.

Police storm hideout

The death toll | Timeline

In video, gunman pledges allegiance to Islamic State

In video, gunman pledges allegiance to Islamic State
He claims revenge for “massacres” in the Middle East. 

Massive crowd marches in solidarity

World leaders arrived to offer their support for a country reeling from a massacre followed by twin hostage situations.

An autopsy says a New Mexico sheriff's deputy who authorities say a fellow deputy killed in a hotel was shot multiple times in the back and had other injuries that appeared related to a fight.

Jeb Bush, Romney already engaged in a tense two-step ahead of 2016

Jeb Bush, Romney already engaged <br />in a tense two-step ahead of 2016

The potential presidential candidates have similar backgrounds as GOP leaders.

The Fix: What is Romney thinking?

Dozens of witnesses in the D.C. area have been slain in the past decade

Dozens of witnesses in the D.C. area have been slain in the past decade
Some of the victims didn’t receive protection, but others were offered protection and turned it down.

Map: Killings of witnesses since 2004 | VIDEO

For witnesses, life can hang by a thread

Swedish bombshell of ‘La Dolce Vita’ assured herself a place in film history

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MEXICO NEWS

Image Credit

One of Mexico's most important and influential journalists of the past half century, Julio Scherer Garcia, died Wednesday at the age of 88, reported Proceso, the newsmagazine he founded.
Mr. Scherer, 88, founded the newsmagazine Proceso and helped expose political scandals
The governor of the southern Mexico state of Guerrero has asked prosecutors to drop charges against a U.S. citizen who returned to her home town to lead a vigilante movement.
Michoacan militias that were formed to fight drug cartels are now having shootouts with each other and the police
Mexico's state oil company wants to import about 100,000 barrels of light U.S. crude a day to mix with this country's heavier oil as a way to improve refinery processes.
Mexican authorities say 10 bodies and 11 severed heads have been discovered in clandestine graves in the troubled southern state of Guerrero.
Mexican authorities held 13 police officers for investigation Thursday in the disappearance of kidnapped journalist Moises Sanchez and awaited the results of DNA tests on a body found in the area to determine if it is him.
D.C. taxicab drivers have company in their complaints about a uniform paint scheme. In Mexico, officials have decreed all cabs be pink.
Hundreds of people gathered in Mexico City's Zocalo Square on Monday, where a gigantic "Rosca de Reyes" or "Three Kings Pastry" was being cut up and handed out for everyone to taste
President Barack Obama embarked on a new year of foreign policy by welcoming Mexico's embattled president to the White House Tuesday, seeking help to jump start a new U.S. approach to immigration, Cuba and trade.
President Enrique Peña Nieto praised President Obama's executive order on undocumented immigrants.

Obama, Mexico's president discuss cartels, border security

During an official visit to the U.S. on Tuesday, Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.
A man sought in connection with a fatal New Year's Day shooting in South Texas was in custody Monday in Mexico, where he's also suspected of killing a taxi driver and a police officer.
Federal troops and police engaged in two clashes with armed civilians in a western Mexico city Tuesday, and nine civilians were killed, the federal security commissioner for Michoacan state said.
Los Angeles County supervisors offered a $25,000 reward Tuesday to help catch an attacker who shot and wounded three members of a family and kidnapped a 3-week-old girl who was later found dead in a trash bin near the Mexican border.
The wife of a Mexican mayor whose police force turned 43 students over to a drug gang that allegedly killed them has been charged with organized crime and money laundering.
State prosecutors detained a town's police force Tuesday following the disappearance of a journalist in the southern state of Veracruz.

As he heads to Washington on Monday to meet with Barack Obama, Enrique Pena Nieto leaves behind a year that was hardly what he had envisioned.

The government had revoked a deal amid a conflict-of-interest scandal involving the first lady's house.

Mexico vigilante founder, 26 others to face homicide charges

Mexico vigilante founder, 26 others held for deadly clash
A judge in the western state of Michoacan has begun homicide proceedings against the founder of a vigilante group and 26 of his followers who were involved in a deadly clash with a rival force in December.

A memorial service is planned for an American man who died while hiking in the rugged mountains in central Mexico.

Hari Simran Singh Khalsa was last heard from Tuesday when he went for a hike. He was found in a ravine.

Missing American found dead in Mexican mountains

Searchers on Friday found the body of an American man who had been missing in the rugged mountains in central Mexico since going on a hike four days ago.

Victim is the latest in a series of abductions and attacks of clerics in a region dominated by drug cartels.

A Mexican court says a vigilante leader and 26 of his followers are under investigation on murder charges for a Dec. 16 confrontation with another group that killed 11.

When the witness refused to sign a false statement that 22 suspected drug gang members had died in a shootout with the Mexican army, state investigators began to kick her in the ribs, she said. They put a bag over her head, plunged her face into a toilet bowl and beat her so hard that, six months later, she still has trouble with her hearing and eyesight.

Protesters in Mexico claim that German arms manufacturers exported rifles to a corrupt local police department implicated in the disappearance of 43 students.
A priest was found dead of a gunshot wound to the head, his diocese said Friday, marking the latest in series of abductions, attacks and highway robberies against Roman Catholic clerics in an area of southern Guerrero state dominated by drug cartels.
The leaders of two rural vigilante groups and 35 of their members have surrendered to authorities following a clash that left 11 dead in the western state of Michoacan, a federal official said Tuesday.

Is Luis Estrada the conscience of Mexico?

An interview with Luis Estrada, the Mexican film director, in which he talks about politics, satire and the "Perfect Dictatorship."
A man apparently killed six children and a woman, then committed suicide at a home in a Mexico City suburb, authorities said Wednesday.
More Monarch butterflies appear to have made the long flight from the U.S. and Canada to their winter nesting ground in western Mexico, raising hopes after their number dropped to a record low last year. But experts still fear that unusual cold temperatures will threaten the orange and black insects.
Karla Sanchez San Martin, one of Mexico's few female bullfighters, vowed Tuesday to return to the ring by mid-January, two days after she and several others were gored by what she said was a "very smart" bull.

A member of the Sinaloa drug cartel who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possess cocaine has been sentenced in New Hampshire to nine years in prison.

They waited in line in the dark outside motor vehicle offices, cheered when the doors opened and celebrated again upon passing their driving tests.

Dozens of Roman Catholic priests and hundreds of parishioners marched through the southern Mexico city of Ciudad Altamirano on Wednesday to demand the release of a kidnapped priest and protest a series of kidnappings, killings and robberies of priests.

A man apparently killed six children and a woman, then committed suicide at a home in a Mexico City suburb, authorities said Wednesday.
Local police in the city of San Fernando in northern Mexico were involved in the 2011 massacres of 193 mainly Central American migrants whose bodies were found in mass graves, according to federal prosecutors.
When President Obama drew a line on immigration, it went straight through Marilu Morales's family, leaving her and four children on one side and her recently deported husband on the other.
The studio where he made art that's been compared to a giant love letter is set to become a cultural center.
Authorities say three people were killed in a rollover crash in northern San Diego County while they were on their way to a funeral service in Mexico.
Motorists at the nation's busiest border crossing were accustomed to waiting hours while vendors paraded between lanes with everything from sliced papaya and hot oatmeal to sombreros and ceramic mugs. Now, thanks to a $741 million construction project, they may not have enough time to lower their windows and order a cappuccino.
A Mexican official says the death toll from a clash between two rural police groups has risen to 11.
A federal judge dismissed criminal charges on Monday against two women who witnessed the June 30 army killing of suspected drug gang members in southern Mexico.
A selection of our best images of 2014 from Latin America and the Caribbean starts with the case of 43 missing - and apparently slain - students in Mexico that ignited indignation across the country and around the world. Officials acknowledged they disappeared at the hands of a corrupt local government and federal authorities took 10 days to intervene.
Mexico is ready to intervene in currency markets to fight the peso's fall against the dollar amid concerns over dropping oil prices and a possible increase in U.S. interest rates.

Mexicans’ search for students’ bodies reveals a history of hidden deaths


Guillermina Sotelo Castañeda holds a photo of her son. (J. Levinson for Post)

Joshua Partlow

Forty-three students went missing in September, but they were hardly the first. Their abduction by police has let loose a flood of new accusations.

In Mexico's forest of the disappeared

© 1996-2010 The Washington Post Company

Yahoo News

Security on agenda as embattled Mexican president visits Obama

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico's embattled President Enrique Pena Nieto will discuss security and justice with U.S. President Barack Obama in Washington next week amid public anger about how he has handled a probe into the apparent massacre of 43 trainee teachers.

Pena Nieto's standing has been battered by a string of massive street protests following the abduction and likely murder of 43 students by a drug gang working with corrupt police in the southwestern city of Iguala on the night of Sept. 26.

More, HERE.

Yahoo News Network

KREM2

December 31, 2014

VIDEO: Toddler fatally shot Blackfoot, ID mom at Hayden Walmart

Photo of Veronica Rutledge from her Facebook account.
Photo of Veronica Rutledge from her Facebook account. Family members granted KREM 2 permission to use the photo.(Photo: KREM)

HAYDEN, Idaho—A toddler shot and killed a Walmart shopper Tuesday morning in what deputies described as an "accident."

The woman was later identified by authorities said Veronica Rutledge from Blackfoot, Idaho. The father-in-law of Walmart shooting victim spoke with KREM 2 News Tuesday night. He called the shooting "tragic." He added the family "lost a beautiful, loving mother."

Walmart employees evacuated the Hayden store around 10:20 a.m. following the gunshot.
Deputies with the Kootenai County Sheriff's Office responded to the scene and found a 29-year-old woman dead inside the store.

Rutledge was shopping with four kids, when her two-year-old son reached into her purse, accessed her concealed 9mm Smith & Wesson M&P Shield semi-automatic handgun and accidentally discharged the weapon, according deputies. Authorities said the toddler was seated in the shopping cart when the gun was discharged. The woman and children were in the back of the store near the electronics area when the deadly shooting happened.

The bullet struck Mrs. Rutledge in the head, killing her instantly.

More, HERE.

© 2015 KREM, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, Inc.

MyBB

Armed squad kidnaps owner of the Doll House night club in Rosarito

MyBB, © 2002-2014.

El Mexicano

Por Edgar JUÁREZ USCANGA / EL MEXICANO

© Copyright El Mexicano 2014

Microsoft

Mexican student protesters vandalize SUV carrying mayor

Dozens of protesting students vandalise an SUV carrying the mayor of the Mexican coastal city of Acapulco, demanding justice over the presumed murder of 43 classmates.

© 2014 Microsoft

GLOBAL RESEARCH

Obama Backs Beleaguered Mexican President Peña Nieto

“NAFTA-Land Security”: How Canada and Mexico Have Become Part of the U.S. Policing Regime

By Paul Ashby; Global Research, December 04, 2014

National Guard PFC monitors one of dozens of cameras on the border with Mexico at the Border Patrol’s Communications Center in Arizona (U.S. Army / Creative Commons)

During this summer’s child migrant crisis and the accompanying frenzy around “security” along the U.S.-Mexico boundary, a spotlight was shone on Mexico’s role in protecting the U.S. “homeland.” It helped illuminate what Washington considers the United States’ territorial boundaries: those of the countries associated with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In other words, the territories of Canada and Mexico are part of the U.S. policing regime, under a regional security framework we might call “NAFTA-land Security.”

Evidence of this emerged in July when a Congressional hearing featured a discussion on, as Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) put it, “what Mexico is actually doing to help us” regarding the unauthorized movement of Central American children. Some lawmakers and officials hinted that insufficient efforts by Mexican authorities made possible the unwanted migrants’ northward movement through Mexico.

In response, administration officials pointed to Mexican President Peña Nieto’s new southern border strategy, one that, as Todd Miller has written, involves the exportation of the U.S. border policing model to Mexico.

More, HERE.

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More Beheaded Bodies Discovered in Southern Mexico

Disappeared Students in Mexico: Global Struggle for Ayotzinapa Captures World’s Attention

By Telesur Global Research, November 22, 2014
More than 200 actions were carried out Thursday, coinciding with Mexico’s Day of Revolution.

A student’s skin was peeled over his head in a gruesome and clear display of a narco-state murder. The photo of the murder, which took place in the drug war-torn state of Guerrero some seven weeks ago, quickly went viral on the Internet. On the same day, five other people were killed and some 43 more students went “missing” in the small town of Ayotzinapa. In a press conference addressing the abuses more than one month after the disappearance of the students, who hailed from a rural-based and selective teachers college in Guerrero, an Attorney General presumed them “dead” without presenting any evidence to substantiate his conclusion. The nation’s leading prosecutor said he was “tired” by the end of the press conference, much to the chagrin of those who sympathized with the plight of the parents of the disappeared students.

Those happenings have served as the sparks that have ignited the nation’s ire to a feverish boiling point in one of the largest countries and economies of Latin America. Mexico has witnessed near daily and nation-wide actions of resistance. Since the disappearance of the “normalistas” (students training to be teachers) on September 26, the country has been brimming with mass marches, candle-light vigils, university-campus and labor-union-led strikes, occupations of official and university buildings, riot police-led arrests of demonstrators, property destruction of official buildings, sit-ins, panels ruminating over the ills of narco-state violence and international bridge closings.

While the 43 students, who are technically still missing due to the lack of any corpses being forensically tied to the students, were what clearly catalyzed the movement’s inception, much of the country has long been weary of the systematic problem of disappearances and the eery official impunity which has often surrounded them. Nothing less than some 24,000 disappearances, over the course of the last three years alone, account for official estimates. Other analysts estimate the actual total as being far higher than that.

The Mayor of Iguala and his wife, dubbed as the “imperial couple,” were arrested several weeks ago, as teleSUR previously reported. At the time of their arrest, speculation was that their detention may produce valuable clues that could help solve the case of the disappeared students. However, no significant advances have been made in the case since the detention of the couple. At the time of their arrest, the on-the-run couple were fugitives from the law and in hiding when authorities busted them at a rented home in Itzapalapa, Mexico City.

More, HERE.

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Angry Protests Sweep Mexico after Government Says Missing Students are Dead


Global Research, November 11, 2014
Angry protests swept Mexico over the weekend in the wake of a press conference Friday in which Jesús Murillo Karam, the country’s attorney general, declared that 43 missing teaching students from the Ayotzinapa Normal School in the state of Guerrero are all dead. Murrillo based this evaluation on confessions by gang members that they had killed the students, who were handed over to them by the police, and then burned their bodies.
Demonstrations in both Mexico City and the Guerrero capital of Chilpancingo saw clashes with police and attacks on government buildings. In the capital, a small group of demonstrators launched an attack on the historic National Palace in the city’s main square (El Zócalo). They first used metal security barriers to ram the building’s wooden door and then doused it with gasoline and set it on fire.
Some demonstrators questioned why it took police so long to respond to these acts, suggesting that they could have been the work of provocateurs.
More, HERE.

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More than 100,000 March in Mexico City over Disappeared Students

By Rafael Azul; Global Research, November 07, 2014
A mass protest march of more than 100,000 students, teachers, education workers and ordinary citizens took place in Mexico City on Wednesday, November 5, in solidarity with the 43 missing teaching students, normalistas, of the Ayotzinapa Normal School, who have been missing for over 40 days.
This was the third mass demonstration and by far the largest and angriest. Many of the participants directed their anger at President Enrique Peña Nieto, demanding that he resign. One protest sign denounced him “for corruption, betraying the nation, ineptitude,” calling him a “repressor and assassin.”
Others carried signs that said, “It was the State.” Leading the march were students from Mexico City’s National Autonomous Metropolitan University (UNAM), the Polytechnic Institute, rural teaching colleges, and Iberian-American University, who all had joined a massive nationwide 72-hour student strike.
At Mexico City’s Constitution Square (the Zócalo), many thousands greeted the protesters as they arrived after the two-and-a-half-hour march from the president’s mansion (Los Pinos). At the mass rally, family members of the 43 disappeared students spoke to the demonstrators. None of the major political parties (the governing PRI, the PAN, the PRD, the Greens) were involved in the protest.
More, HERE.
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Mexico Disarms Local Police in Missing Students’ City

By Press TV,Global Research, October 07, 2014
Mexican federal forces have disarmed the entire police department in the southern city of Iguala after its officers were accused of collaborating with a gang behind the recent disappearance of 43 students.
On Monday, the government’s new federal police unit took over security in Iguala, located some 200 kilometers (125 miles) south of the capital, Mexico City.

The federal unit was tasked with holding order in the city and helping search for the students who went missing last month after a deadly police shooting.
The deployment in the southern violence-stricken state of Guerrero came after President Enrique Pena Nieto vowed to establish justice and bring an end to corruption in the country.
Pena Nieto said he had dispatched the federal forces to Iguala to “find out what happened and apply the full extent of the law to those responsible.”The decision to disarm Iguala’s police corps came just days after 28 charred bodies were found in a mass grave on the outskirts of the city.
State prosecutor Inaky Blanco has said the recovered bodies probably belonged to the missing students. State officials also say it will take up to two weeks to receive the results of DNA tests to identify the corpses.
The students, all trainee teachers, went missing following a police attack on September 26 against a protest over teachers’ rights.
According to Blanco, state investigators have obtained video footage showing local police arresting a number of students during the clashes and taking them away.
Prosecutors said the Guerreros Unidos drug gang also participated in the police shooting that left six people dead and 25 others wounded.
Mexican authorities have already arrested 22 officers and issued arrest warrants for Iguala mayor Jose Luis Albarca and his security chief over the deadly incident.
More, HERE.
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Militarization and Political Crisis in Mexico

Is Mexico a Narco-State?

By Michael Werbowski;Global Research, May 31, 2010
Mexico - In the wake of Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s recent state visit to the U.S and Canada, a burning question remains without any clear answer.
2010 is historically significant for Mexico. It is its bi-centennial year of independence ( in 1810 the country began to break free from Spanish imperial tutelage) and perhaps more significantly is is also the centenary year of the 1910 Mexican revolution. There is little to celebrate though. The country this year, is still reeling from the vortex of drug-trafficking crimes, the global economic down-turn and the fall-out from the histrionics and panic induced by the H1N1-Swine flu “pandemic” of 2009.
Mexico after a decade of the centre-right almost “corporatist” PAN ( National Action Party) party’s rule, ( as in 2000, the first PAN candidate won the presidency, Vincente Fox) has been practically “Balkanised”. And as a result, it is now faced with a crippling fragmentation of the federation itself, due mainly to territorial battles or “turf wars” going on between rival drug cartels, which operate almost with impunity in many Mexican states. Possibly, the most fascinating and insightful read on this phenomenal topic is: Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State? . While I was pondering over the question raised by the book’s title , I was somewhat astonished to read in (despite what I witnessed first hand in Mexico) the concluding chapter, a rather reassuring reply. That basically, Mexico is far from becoming another Somalia, Pakistan or Haiti.
More, HERE.
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Destabilizing Mexico

By Rev. Richard Skaff; Global Research, March 13, 2009
Attorney General Eric Holder stated on February 25, 2009 that Mexican drug cartels pose a national security threat, and issued a direct warning to these cartels that they will be destroyed.
The warning came as the attorney general and acting Drug Enforcement Administration chief Michele Leonhart announced the completion of the final phase of DEA’s “Operation Xcellerator,” which targeted the Sinaloa cartel, a major western Mexico drug operation that has been expanding its reach into the United States . [1].
Meanwhile, the blood shed in the Mexican cities continues to be extensive and has expanded its tentacles of violence to various cities in Mexico. Lawlessness, corruption, murders, decapitations, and kidnappings have taken the Mexican cities by a storm, giving rise to a new radical group calling itself the Juarez Citizens Command that is threatening to strike back against lawlessness that has gripped Mexico for a long time. The group stated that they are going to strike back by killing one criminal a day until order and peace is restored. Similar groups are popping up all across Mexico. [2].
In its last report, the US Department of justice disclosed that 17.2 billion dollars in cash entered Mexico in only the past two years as a result of money laundering operation in their country. The report advised that Mexico and Colombia are the principal destinations of narco resources that operate in the US and that “the laundering of drug money is a global industry” with transnational organizations present in various countries. [2].
According to a DEA undercover operative, the Mexican drug cartels have gained more and more of the American market. They have grown bolder in their attempts to expand their operations in Mexico and the United States . They now control the ruling party in Mexico and operate the biggest drug business on earth right here in the USA . [2].
Mexico’s drug and violence problem now engulfs the entire country, inundating cities along the U.S.-Mexico border. The robust drug cartel reduced its position in the western mountains, and lunged into the heart of national power in Mexico City. The capital that was once relatively immune to such contemptuous boldness of drug killings has become the scene of multiple assassinations of high-ranking federal police officials in about a week. More than 1,000 people have been killed in Mexico this year in drug-related violence and about 6,290 in 2008. [11].
More, HERE.
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MORE MEXICO ARTICLES, BY GLOBAL RESEARCH, HERE
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By Tony Cartalucci, January 08, 2015
cherif-gauche-said-kouachi

Shooters were radicalized in Europe, sent to Syria, returned, previously arrested by Western security agencies for terrorism and long on the watch-list of French and other Western intelligence agencies. Yet “somehow” they still managed to execute a highly organized attack in the heart of Europe.

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policestate

Alongside the militarization of police which provides high powered weaponry and armored vehicles to state and local law enforcement, officers are receiving military-style training funded and supervised by the DOJ. Since 2002 “active shooter training” has been conducted by a project called ALERRT—Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training.

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Federal Court Gives “Early Christmas Present” to War Criminals Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld and Others, Immunizing Them From Civil Inquiry Regarding Iraq War

By Inder Comar, December 22, 2014

iran_us_iraq

The lawsuit claimed that high-ranking Bush officials used the fear of 9/11 to mislead the American public into supporting a war against Iraq, and that they issued knowingly false statements that Iraq was in league with Al-Qaeda and had WMD.

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New York City Mayor Calls for a Halt to Protests against Police Violence

By Andre Damon, Global Research, December 23, 2014
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Did Raul Castro Just Reverse The Entire Cuban Revolution?

Global Research, December 18, 2014

Raul Castro may have potentially made a fatal mistake that risks destroying everything the Cuban Revolution built over the past half century. By entering into a deal with the US, he’s letting the wily Color Revolution fox into the hen house, and he’s also betraying his multipolar Russian ally at the same time.
Havana and Washington entered into a surprise deal yesterday to historically restore their relations after engaging in a high-profile prisoner swap. Nobody was expecting such a major development to occur, making many wonder how such an impactful decision could be kept under wraps for so long. The reason being was likely that the US understood what a major hemispheric power play this was and wanted to do everything to safeguard its secret strategy.

On the contrary, Cuba, whether its leadership realizes it or not, has everything to lose, and it’s clear from the details that Washington was ‘negotiating’ from a position of strength. While Raul may have thought he could outmaneuver the imminent Color Revolution attempt that will occur after Fidel’s death, he may have actually committed a Yanukovich-esque tactical mistake by trying to enter into agreement with the same forces obsessed with his ouster.

Modern Lessons

Before diving in to the nitty-gritty of Raul’s decision, it is necessary to quickly take an overview of two monumental lessons of the past few years that should not have been lost on any global leader:

More, HERE.
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justice
Any person involved in the chain of command that authorized the crimes detailed in the Senate Torture Report should be indicted for war crimes and conspiracy. This includes George W. Bush, Richard Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, CIA officials who condoned such practices, attorneys who authorized such practices.
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torture
The Senate committee report on CIA torture ultimately upholds the legitimacy of the US intelligence apparatus, the US government, its military and intelligence agenda and its “humanitarian wars” waged in different parts of the World.
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Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa was a Crime of the State

By Richard Roman and Edur Velasco Arregui
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iraqichildren
“From the beginning of humankind there has been brutality, conflict, intrigue, the destructive obsession with a narrow self-interest”, said Blair in acceptance. Freudian slip or what. He praised “the magnificent American and British Military” with Save The Children and other NGOs for their work in Africa.
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ISIL invasion

The US led war against the Islamic State is a big lie. Going after ”Islamic terrorists” is used to justify a military agenda. The Islamic State is a creation of US intelligence. Washington’s “Counter-terrorism Agenda” in Iraq & Syria consists in Supporting the Terrorists.
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New Evidence Proves Israel Attacked USS Liberty With Orders to Kill 294 Americans

By Aaron Nelson;Global Research, November 14, 2014
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US Government Sanitizes Vietnam War History

By Marjorie Cohn, Global Research, October 30, 2014, Marjoriecohn.com
For many years after the Vietnam War, we enjoyed the “Vietnam syndrome,” in which US presidents hesitated to launch substantial military attacks on other countries.

They feared intense opposition akin to the powerful movement that helped bring an end to the war in Vietnam. But in 1991, at the end of the Gulf War, George H.W. Bush declared,“By God, we’ve kicked the Vietnam syndrome once and for all!”

With George W. Bush’s wars on Iraq and Afghanistan, and Barack Obama’s drone wars in seven Muslim-majority countries and his escalating wars in Iraq and Syria, we have apparently moved beyond the Vietnam syndrome. By planting disinformation in the public realm, the government has built support for its recent wars, as it did with Vietnam.

Now the Pentagon is planning to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War by launching a $30 million program to rewrite and sanitize its history. Replete with a fancy interactive website, the effort is aimed at teaching schoolchildren a revisionist history of the war. The program is focused on honoring our service members who fought in Vietnam. But conspicuously absent from the website is a description of the antiwar movement, at the heart of which was the GI movement.

Thousands of GIs participated in the antiwar movement.

More, HERE.
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Ottawa Lockdown (22 Oct 2014 - TD Photo)
Prime Minister Steven Harper is using the shooting rampage on Parliament Hill as a justification for imposing broad surveillance and detainment measures that were already being implemented.

Copyright © 2005-2014 GlobalResearch.ca

Why America Is to Blame for Mexico's Carnage and Corruption

By John M. Ackerman, November 26, 2014

The crisis over 43 massacred students shows how dysfunctional and corrupt Peña Nieto's government is. And yet Obama keeps patting him on the back.

Le Monde

Soupçons sur un autre enlèvement massif au Mexique 6

France 24 affirme qu'une trentaine de lycéens ont été enlevés en juillet à Cocula, village voisin d'Iguala, et sont toujours portés disparus.

Etudiants disparus au Mexique : un leader historique de la gauche démissionne de son parti

Après la disparition de 43 étudiants, les dirigeants politiques du Mexique affrontent une crise historique.

Edito du Monde

Le retour des heures sombres au Mexique

Deux ans après son entrée en fonctions, le président mexicain, Enrique Peña Nieto, est confronté à la plus grave crise de son mandat.
Récit

Polémique sur la somptueuse villa de l’épouse du président mexicain

Les soupçons de conflit d’intérêts se multiplient, et ce alors que le président Peña Nieto affronte la plus grave crise de son mandat après la disparition de 43 étudiants.

Compte rendu

Révolte contre l’« Etat-mafia » au Mexique

Après la disparition de 43 étudiants, le président Peña Nieto affronte la plus grave crise de son mandat.

Mexique : heurts après un défilé pour les étudiants disparus Vidéo

Des heurts se sont produits entre des groupes de manifestants et la police anti-émeute face au Palais national, au centre de Mexico, jeudi.

Des heurts dans le centre de Mexico autour de la disparition des 43 étudiants

Policiers et manifestants se sont opposés devant le Palais national au centre de la capitale, jeudi soir.

Pourquoi le Mexique se révolte-t-il après l'enlèvement de 43 étudiants ? Vidéo

Les manifestations violentes se succèdent au Mexique depuis l'enlèvement de 43 étudiants, le 26 septembre. Comment cette crise est-elle devenue le symbole d'une colère profonde de la population?

Mexique : marche nationale des familles des disparus Vidéo

Les familles veulent dire « non » à la violence.

Plus de Mexique, ICI

© Le Monde.fr

The Wall Street Journal

New Ties by Mexico Builder Roil Nation
Opposition parties called for a probe into a loan and home purchase the Mexican finance minister secured from the same politically connected businessman who built and held the title to a mansion for Mexico’s first lady.

- See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.pt7agj56.dpuf

Mexico Digs Into Ties Between Leader, Builder

Little-Known Government Deals Won by a Contractor Seen Close to President Peña Nieto Emerge, as Opposition Calls for Probes

U.S. Marshals Service Personnel Dressed as Mexican Marines Pursue Cartel Bosses

Members of U.S. Marshals Service Join Military Operations in Mexico Against Drug Gangs

More, HERE.

Copyright ©2014 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

NPR

December 26, 2014, Scott Neuman

NPR's Carrie Kahn reports that the body of a kidnapped Catholic priest has been discovered after he was seized in the southern state of Guerrero earlier this week.

The body of Rev. Gregorio Lopez Gorostieta was found with a gunshot wound to the head, not far from the seminary where he lived near Ciudad Altamirano. Carrie says he is the third priest this year to be killed in Guerrero, where 43 students were kidnapped by corrupt police and presumably murdered by drug traffickers. Gorostieta is the first, however, to have been seized since the students disappeared in September.

More, HERE.

More MEXICO stories by NPR, HERE.

November 19, 2014

Eyder Peralta

Amid rumblings about conflict of interest and corruption, Mexico's first lady says she will sell a multimillion-dollar home in one of the most glamorous areas of Mexico City.
In a YouTube video released late Tuesday, Angélica Rivera defiantly proclaims that she has "nothing to hide."
"I have worked all my life, and because of that I am an independent woman capable of building a patrimony with honesty," she said.
Rivera and her husband, President Enrique Peña Nieto, have been under heavy scrutiny lately: first, because of the way the government has handled the case of 43 students who went missing after they were detained by police, and then after Aristegui Noticias revealed that an opulent modern structure dubbed "The White House" and valued at $7 million was owned by a construction company awarded millions in government contracts.
As Aristegui explained, the house, which Rivera showed off in a glitzy spread in the royal-centric magazine ¡Hola!, was just another symbol of the "close relationship between Peña Nieto and Grupo Higa."
According to the investigation, Grupo Higa is owned by Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantú, who in the past rented out airplanes for the Peña Nieto's 2012 presidential campaign. The company, Aristegui reports, received millions of dollars in contracts in the state of Mexico when Peña Nieto was governor.
Once Peña Nieto was in the presidential palace, a subsidiary of Hinojosa's company was awarded part of a huge contract to build a high-speed train from Mexico City to Querétaro.
Just days before the report was published, Peña Nieto canceled the $3.7 billion contract.
More, HERE.

© 2014 NPR

Business Monitor International

Industry Forecast - Mexico Offers Strongest Banking Sector Growth Potential - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Latin America / Economy

Slowing economic activity will temper asset and loan growth in several Latin American economies throughout our five-year forecast period. In contrast, we see stronger banking sector growth prospect...

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Risk Summary - Mexico - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Mexico / Economy

Mexico's Short-Term Political Risk Rating (STPRR) remains unchanged from last month at 63.5, ranking 8th out of 17 Latin American countries scored, and 12.3 points below regional leader Chile. Mexi...

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Political Risk Analysis - Ruling PRI To Lose Support In Midterms Due To Iguala Crisis - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Mexico / Economy

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto's approval rating will continue to fall in the coming months, as the disappearance of 43 students in Iguala heightens concerns over security and corruption. This will have negative implications for the ruling Partido Institucional Revolucionario in the June 2015 mid-term elections, increasing the odds of a strong result by the main centre-right opposi...

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© 2015 Business Monitor International

Al Jazeera America

Crude harvest: Selling Mexico's oil

VIDEO: Mexico may be hitting the perfect storm when it opens its energy resources to foreign investors.

30 Dec 2014

Against the backdrop of Mexico's ever-widening gap between rich and poor, growing violence, and stalled economy, President Enrique Pena Nieto has passed a series of economic reforms.

Under these reforms, Mexico's oil, which was expropriated from foreign interests 75 years ago, is now for sale to private, international companies.

Twenty years ago, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which opened Mexico up to trade with the US and Canada, led to the collapse of agriculture, and paved the way to the privatization of oil.

The operations of Mexico's state-owned oil company, Pemex, have never been entirely transparent, and communities have been crippled by oil disasters. For instance, in October 2013, the state of Tabasco experienced its worst oil disaster when a drill site exploded and burned for 55 days, contaminating the surrounding land and water. Villagers closest to the site say they are suffering from health problems and have lost their livestock. They say Pemex has never accepted responsibility for the accident, nor has it offered any compensation.

More, HERE.

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OPINION: Privatising Mexico's oil industry spells disaster

In the absence of strong state institutions, the privatisation of Mexico's oil industry will be disastrous.

30 Dec 2014, By

Edgardo Buscaglia is a Senior Law and Economics Scholar at Columbia University in New York and President of the Instituto de Accion Ciudadana in Mexico.

Who can deny that Mexico is one of the most admired cradles of civilisation, with its culture and history considered an integral part of the world's historical heritage. Yet, Mexico is also a country whose population for centuries has been raped by corrupt authoritarian governments; it is a country which has suffered domestic and regional conflicts leading to foreign interventions backing extractive business interests.

The 1910 Mexican Revolution brought together various groups calling for social justice. It was a natural reaction to centuries of foreign looting of Mexico's resources. One of the consequences of the Revolution was the decision by the

Mexican government to nationalise the immense reserves of oil in the 1930s.

However, it seems that Mexican politicians today have failed to learn a lesson from history. The administration of Mexican President Pena Nieto recently approved legal reforms which will make it possible once again for private firms to become the major players in the Mexican oil business.

More, HERE.

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Who's making money off the War on Drugs?

Disappearance of 43 students from Mexico spurred a national debate about the winners and losers in war on drugs.

Since the disappearance of 43 students from #Ayotzinapa school in Guerrero, Mexico, people around the world have taken to the streets to demand an end to drug-related crime and the close ties between drug cartels, police and political institutions. So if everybody's losing, who's winning?

The rebel spirit driving Mexico’s protests has deep roots

Analysis: Outrage over case of 43 missing students has helped unleash widespread discontent with a deep historical echo

Protests over missing students spread in Mexico

A chronology of the disappearance of 43 students from a teachers’ college in Mexico and its aftermath

Mexico’s church calls for government to change response to violence

Cardinal Norberto Rivera Carrera calls changes ‘necessary,’ says pope is monitoring case of 43 missing students

Cuba-US thaw is a win for Latin America

Analysis: Return of US-Cuban diplomatic relations will affect entire region and possibly isolate Venezuela

Latin America celebrates new US-Cuba era

Chile’s minister of foreign relations calls the Obama and Castro speeches the beginning of the end of the Cold War

VIDEO: Mexico's Nieto faces growing calls to resign

02 Dec 2014

President's second anniversary in office marred by protests as he and the government are accused of corruption.

With help from the Obama administration, Peña Nieto is brutally reshaping Mexican society

Through the story of one immigrant family, we explore the evolution of racism and migration in the US.

President Pena Nieto proposes changes to police force following uproar over presumed massacre of 43 students.
Ferguson: Lawmakers urge calm, offer few policy prescriptions

Analysis: Think riots have never caused change in America? Think again

Brown's parents vow to 'keep fighting' for justice

Protesters upset by Ferguson decision storm St. Louis City Hall

Confronting race and inequality in the US

Week before verdict, 12 killed by US law enforcement

Please click on HERE to get updated Al Jazeera, Mexico news

Drug trafficking organizations are rapidly splintering, but there€’s no end in sight to the violence

Topics:

Mexico

Drugs

Drug Cartels
The village warriors of Guerrero

Cocaine, heroin and avocados

Tens of thousands of people angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students are marching in Mexico City as part of another day of nationwide protests.
Protesters on Thursday waved blackened flags of Mexico and many chanted for the resignation of President Enrique Pena Nieto. "He will fall, he will fall, Pena Nieto will fall," they chanted.
Some protesters clashed with riot police near the city's international airport at the start of the day's demonstrations, burning tyres, throwing firebombs and launching firecrackers at police.
Thursday’s protest was the latest protest over the government's handling of a crime that has infuriated Mexicans fed up with corruption, impunity and a drug war that has left more than 100,000 people dead or missing since 2006.
The case has turned into the biggest challenge of Pena Nieto's nearly two-year-old presidency, on top of another scandal over a mansion his wife bought from a government contractor.
'Mexico is hurting'
The crisis erupted after the mayor of the city of Iguala allegedly ordered police to confront students on September 26, sparking a night of violence that left six people dead and 43 missing, authorities say.
Protesters angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students take to the streets for another day of demonstrations.

More, HERE.

Police officer fires on Mexico City students, inflaming tensions

Students had been planning for a Nov. 20 national strike in solidarity with 43 missing students from Guerrero

INSIDE STORY

VIDEO: Missing Mexico students: Who is responsible.

Protesters demand justice for missing 43 trainee teachers who are feared murdered in Mexico. To watch video click on HERE.

Mexico president pushes trade ties in China while protests rage at home

Peña Nieto's Beijing trip amid massive political crisis at home shows heavy bet on China ties as economic boost

Mexico missing student protesters burn state buildings

Protest movement has hit Guerrero'€™s tourism industry with vacationers canceling trips during busiest time of year.

Photos: In Acapulco, an angry demonstration over missing students

Students, peasants and others attempt to block the airport and clash with police.

Mexico leader travels to Asia amid rising unrest over missing students

Peña Nieto faces increased calls to resign as another presidential scandal emerged over the weekend

Mexico protesters set fire to National Palace over missing students

Gang members have confessed to killing the 43 missing students and dumping their charred remains in a landfill.

Gang members confess to mass killing of Mexico students

Charred human remains found in a dumpster are likely the students who disappeared on Sept. 26, Mexican authorities say.

Mexican army accepts criticism of human rights commission in killings

The defense department says, however, it doesn't agree with all findings of human rights commission on the June slayings.

Why have the most recent kidnappings in Mexico sparked such outrage?

The disappearance of 43 students in Mexico has triggered nationwide demonstrations for government accountability.

Thousands protest missing Mexico students despite mayor arrest

Public anger over student disappearances brings Mexico City to a standstill; full-blown crisis for President Peña Nieto.

Photos: Protests over 43 Guerrero students target government buildings

A city congress and buildings tied to the ruling party are trashed and burned.

The food producer has developed more than 480 varieties of wheat, upping production by an estimated 200 million tonnes.
Mexican official: CIA 'manages' drug trade

Spokesman for Chihuahua state says US agencies don't want to end drug trade, a claim denied by other Mexican officials

24 Jul 2012, by Chris Arsenault

Juarez, Mexico - The US Central Intelligence Agency and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers", a spokesman for the Chihuahua state government in northern Mexico has told Al Jazeera, instead "they try to manage the drug trade".
Allegations about official complicity in the drug business are nothing new when they come from activists, professors, campaigners or even former officials. However, an official spokesman for the authorities in one of Mexico's most violent states - one which directly borders Texas - going on the record with such accusations is unique.

"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva, the Chihuahua spokesman, told Al Jazeera last month at his office in Juarez. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."

Accusations are 'baloney'
Villanueva is not a high ranking official and his views do not represent Mexico's foreign policy establishment. Other more senior officials in Chihuahua State, including the mayor of Juarez, dismissed the claims as "baloney".
"I think the CIA and DEA [US Drug Enforcement Agency] are on the same side as us in fighting drug gangs," Hector Murguia, the mayor of Juarez, told Al Jazeera during an interview inside his SUV. "We have excellent collaboration with the US."
Under the Merida Initiative, the US Congress has approved more than $1.4bn in drug war aid for Mexico, providing attack helicopters, weapons and training for police and judges.
More than 55,000 people have died in drug related violence in Mexico since December 2006. Privately, residents and officials across Mexico's political spectrum often blame the lethal cocktail of US drug consumption and the flow of high-powered weapons smuggled south of the border for causing much of the carnage.
"The war on drugs is an illusion," Hugo Almada Mireles, professor at the Autonomous University of Juarez and author of several books, told Al Jazeera. "It's a reason to intervene in Latin America."
"The CIA wants to control the population; they don't want to stop arms trafficking to Mexico, look at [Operation] Fast and Furious,” he said, referencing a botched US exercise where automatic weapons were sold to criminals in the hope that security forces could trace where the guns ended up.
The Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms lost track of 1,700 guns as part of the operation, including an AK-47 used in 2010 the murder of Brian Terry, a Customs and Border Protection Agent.
More, HERE.
© 2014 Al Jazeera America, LLC. All rights reserved.

InSight Crime

InSight Crime is a foundation dedicated to the study of the principal threat to national and citizen security in Latin America and the Caribbean: organized crime. We seek to deepen and inform the debate about organized crime in the Americas by providing the general public with regular reporting, analysis and investigation on the subject and on state efforts to combat it. More about Insight Crime HERE.

Iguala Massacre: Mexico's PR Message Goes Up in Flames

The stunning, dramatic blow-by-blow account of what most likely happened to the 43 missing students in Guerrero is an indication of just how desperately Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto and his team are trying to perform damage control on a terrifying story -- one that has not only unsettled his government, but has pushed them to admit that things are not as their public relations machine would have you believe.
In the hour-long November 7 press conference (see video below), Attorney General Jose Murillo Karam announced that the recent capture of alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos led to confessions that the students were taken by police while en route to the town of Iguala. The police handed the students over to the Guerreros Unidos, who then killed them and burned their remains.

Specifically, video testimonies from three recently captured “masterminds” of the attacks revealed that the students were carted like cattle to a landfill in Cocula. According to one suspect, approximately 15 students asphyxiated on the way to the dump site. The remaining students were interrogated by members of the Guerreros Unidos before being shot and killed. The bodies were then thrown into the landfill, arranged in a circle, covered in sticks, gasoline, and diesel, and burned. The fire reportedly lasted for 14 hours, from midnight on September 27, until mid-afternoon.
According to the testimonies, a leader of the criminal group known as “El Terco” ordered the burned human remains to be collected and placed into eight black plastic bags. Members of the Guerreros Unidos then took the bags to the San Juan River in Cocula, where they dumped the contents into the water, while two bags were thrown directly into the river.
Following the confessions, search teams found black bags, one of which was still closed. Mexican and Argentine forensic teams reportedly confirmed the bag contained human remains. However, due to the degree to which the bodies were burned, forensic experts have not yet determined when the remains will be able to be identified.

More, HERE.

 

Business Insider

Tens Of Thousands Of Mexicans Protest In The Streets Over 43 Missing Students

Carola Sole, AFP

Oct. 9, 2014
Mexico City (AFP) - Tens of thousands of people held protests in Mexico, joining tearful families of 43 missing students demanding their return amid fears a police-backed gang executed them.
Crowds on Wednesday gathered from Mexico City to the violence-wracked state of Guerrero, where the students disappeared, and as far south as Chiapas.
Parents of the victims traveled from Guerrero to head a march of thousands of people in Mexico City, tearfully holding up pictures of their sons, and signs reading "we want them back alive."
More, HERE.
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Mexican Official Accuses CIA Of 'Managing' Not 'Fighting' The Drug Trade

Jul. 24, 2012, by
A Mexican state government spokesman told Al Jazeera that the CIA and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers" as much as "try to manage the drug trade," Chris Arsenault reports.
"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Chihuahua spokesman Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva told Al Jazeera. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."
More, HERE.
Copyright © 2014 Business Insider Inc. All rights reserved.

Infowars.com

Former CIA Officer Says ISIS and Mexican Drug Cartels Communicate

U.S. Gov. and CIA connected to drugs and terror

By Kurt Nimmo | Infowars.com | August 21, 2014

A former CIA officer, now a security consultant who regularly appears on Fox News, told the Laura Ingraham Show Thursday ISIS and Mexican drug cartels communicate with each other.
“We’ve had good intel over the years about al-Qaeda, about their efforts to coordinate with, as an example, Mexican cartels… in an effort to try to exploit our southern border,” Mike Baker told Ingraham.
The one-time CIA employee said there is “a lot of communication” between ISIS and drug cartels and “the cartels are a business… if there’s a revenue stream they can exploit, then they will, and the extremists understand that.”
It is not clear if this intel was passed on to Baker by his former colleagues.
In 2012 a spokesman for the Chihuahua state in Mexico, Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva told Aljazerra the CIA and other intelligence agencies manage the drug trade in Mexico.
More, HERE.

Contact:512-291-5750512-291-5750 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Infowars, P.O. Box 19549, Austin, TX 78760

The Daily Beast

Anatomy of a Mexican Student Massacre

10.08.14, by Jason McGahan

For almost a century a teacher’s college in rural Mexico has been training educators and activists. Last month, dozens were abducted and slaughtered—by the police.
MEXICO CITY — Twelve days ago, police and unidentified gunmen believed to be members of a drug cartel ambushed a caravan of college student activists in the state of Guerrero, about half way from Mexico City to Acapulco.
Near the central plaza in the town of Iguala, a total of six persons were shot to death. Three were student activists from the Raúl Isidro Burgos Rural Teachers College of Ayotzinapa. Three additional shooting victims were a semiprofessional soccer player riding in one of the three buses, a taxi driver, and his female passenger. But most likely they were unintended victims caught in the line of fire. There’s no question the students were the target.
One who survived the first fusillade, a 19-year-old named Julio César Mondragón, panicked and, over the objections of classmates who said they should stay together, ran away on his own. He was later found dead and horribly disfigured; a photo of his corpse has gone viral in Mexico: it shows the face stripped away to the bare skull underneath.
Survivors of the incident report that the police and thugs attacked the students three times. They sprayed one of the buses with machine gun fire. One eyewitness reported seeing the police force students out of another bus at gunpoint. In addition to the three students killed, 17 student activists were wounded. But they may have been the lucky ones. As many as 44 others were abducted. Some reports say they were taken away in police vehicles. None of them have been seen since September 26.
The precise motives for the killings are difficult to determine, but the students come from a school that has been training rural teachers—and activists—for the better part of a century. Their commitment to helping small farmers and farm workers in the rugged, semi-feudal countryside often has put them at odds with the local powers that be. And when you add to that the cozy relationship that exists today between some of those powers and narcotics traffickers, the situation is explosive.
More, HERE.
© 2014 The Daily Beast Company LLC

The New American

U.S. Government and Top Mexican Drug Cartel Exposed as Partners

14 January 2014, by 

For over a decade, under multiple administrations, the U.S. government had a secret agreement with the ruthless Mexican Sinaloa drug cartel that allowed it to operate with impunity, an in-depth investigation by a leading Mexican newspaper confirmed this week. In exchange for information and assistance in quashing competing criminal syndicates, the Bush and Obama administrations let the Sinaloa cartel import tons of drugs into the United States while wiping out Sinaloa competitors and ensuring that its leaders would not be prosecuted for their long list of major crimes. Other revelations also point strongly to massive but clandestine U.S. government involvement in drug trafficking.

Relying on over 100 interviews with current and former government functionaries on both sides of the border, as well as official documents from the U.S. and Mexican governments, Mexico’s El Universal concluded that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and the U.S. Justice Department had secretly worked with Mexican drug lords. The controversial conspiring led to increased violence across Mexico, where many tens of thousands have been murdered in recent years, the newspaper found after its year-long probe. The U.S. agents and their shady deals with Mexican drug lords even sparked what the paper called a “secret war” inside Mexico.

The newspaper’s investigation also confirmed long-held suspicions that U.S. authorities were signing secret agreements with Mexican drug cartels — especially Sinaloa, which CIA operatives have said was a favorite for use in achieving geo-political objectives. Supposedly without the knowledge or approval of officials in Mexico, ICE and DEA, with a green light from Washington, D.C., made deals with criminal bosses allowing them to avoid prosecution for a vast crime spree that has included mass murder, corruption, bribery, drug trafficking, extortion, and more. In exchange, cartel leaders simply had to help U.S. officials eliminate their competitors — certainly a win-win scenario for crime bosses who prefer to operate without competition or fear of prosecution.

More, HERE.

Alex Newman, a foreign correspondent for The New American, is normally based in Europe after growing up in Latin America, including seven years in Mexico. He can be reached at   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Related articles:

CIA “Manages” Drug Trade, Mexican Official Says

Reports: CIA Working with Mexican Drug Cartels

Trafficker: U.S. Feds Aided Mexican Drug Cartel

Mexican Drug Trafficker Says He Worked With Feds

Stratfor Sources: U.S. Troops in Mexico as Feds Aid Cartels

Congress Probes DEA Drug Money Laundering Scheme

Feds Let Mexican Cartel Hit Men Kill in U.S., Senior Lawman Told Stratfor

Fast and Furious: FBI Now Linked to Murder of U.S. Border Agent

U.S. Judge: Obama Homeland Security Aiding Criminal Conspiracies

Impeachment Support Soars as Voters Say Feds “Out of Control”

Copyright © 2014 The New American

GlobalPost – International News

Mexico accepts student demands in bid to avert spread of protests

Agencia EFE; October 4, 2014

Mexico City, Oct 4 (EFE).- Mexico's government has accepted all the demands of student protesters at the National Polytechnic Institute, or IPN, a public university in this capital, in a bid to prevent the movement from spreading to other higher education institutions.

On Sept. 22, students at the IPN's Superior School of Engineering and Architecture halted activities to protest new internal regulations that they said lowered the institution's academic and professional level.

More, HERE.

Copyright EFE, 2014.

Home

A Battle Has Erupted Over Washington’s Legal Cannabis Plazas

By Bill Conroy - December 18, 2014 at 8:08 pm

The Outcome Could Help Define A Path To A Peaceful End To the Drug War

A major turf war has erupted in the grand experiment to legalize marijuana in the state of Washington.

However, this battle is being waged with the tools of politics, the courts and organizing, unlike the drug war, where disputes over control of the drug plazas, or markets, normally are settled with bullets.

The stakes are high in this turf dispute in Washington, with hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue on the table and the future of a nascent cannabis industry hanging in the balance.

More, HERE.

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Torture Report Reveals CIA’s Manipulation of US Media

By Bill Conroy - December 12, 2014

Agency Used Classified Information As Currency For Deception

The recently released Senate Select Committee on Intelligence report pillorying the CIA’s Bush-era detention and interrogation program is replete with lurid details of what would commonly be called torture, if those practices were carried out on you or me.

Waterboarding, rectal feeding, sleep deprivation, coffin-size cells and forcing detainees to stand in stress positions, even with broken bones, is the stuff of a horror movie. But there is another revelation in the long-awaited, and controversial, Senate committee report that so far seems to have slipped past much examination in the public spotlight.

More, HERE.

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US Military’s Training of Mexican Security Forces Continues As Human-Rights Abuses Mount In Mexico

Posted by Bill Conroy - December 3, 2014

DoD Officials Claim Training is Part of the Solution, Not the Problem
The U.S. government has spent more than $62 million since fiscal year 2010 providing highly specialized training to Mexican security forces, including some $16.3 million in fiscal 2013, as part of an effort to help Mexico better prosecute its war on drugs, records made public under the U.S. Foreign Assistance Act show.

Local Opposition to Washington’s Legal Marijuana Businesses Is a Taxing Issue For the Fledgling Industry

Posted by Bill Conroy - November 14, 2014
Effort to Overcome City Moratoriums on Cannabis Shops Could Spark an Unlikely Alliance
The great experiment in the state of Washington to legalize the sale of marijuana through a regulated and taxed market has hit a hitch at the local level that threatens to slow progress to a snail’s pace, even as more and more marijuana businesses obtain the state licensing needed to open their doors.
Through early November, Washington’s cannabis market, state records show, included some 63 retailers, 239 producers and 197 processors — all issued the required state-level licenses to begin doing business in the state. But the battle ahead for many of them — and others in the pipeline — to actually open their doors for business is far from over.

More, HERE.
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Labor Unions Are Supporting Washington State Legal Marijuana Dispensaries that Create "More Workers to Organize"

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 22, 2014
The United Food and Commercial Workers and other Unions Seek to Strengthen Protections for Cannabis Workers
What’s going on in the state of Washington and beyond with the movement to legalize marijuana is, only in part, about business, taxes and government oversight — all to be amplified by the billions of dollars annually this new industry promises to throw off.

More, HERE.
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Community Police in Guerrero’s Costa Chica Region to Celebrate 19 Years of a Better Way to Combat Crime and Corruption

The Same Southern Mexican State Where 43 Students Were Disappeared Is also Home to a Grassroots Movement that Shows How People Can Police Themselves When the State Becomes Criminal.

By Greg Berger and Oscar Olivera

Special for The Narco News Bulletin

November 7, 2014

Publisher’s Note: In Mexico and throughout the world the state of Guerrero has become a vivid example of the horrors of the “war on drugs” and the pervasive corruption and violence it invites from all levels of government. On September 26, Mayor Jose Luis Abarca of the city of Iguala ordered police to detain a group of students from the local Ayotzinapa teachers’ college. The mayor’s ties to organized crime have been widely documented. It is believed that the mayor thought the students were planning to stage a protest at a public event held by his wife. Police then killed six students, and 43 more were disappeared. The police reportedly turned the 43 youths over to a local criminal gang. Multiple mass graves have been dug up in the area, each at first rumored to contain the bodies of the students, then have been revealed to be the tombs of previous nameless casualties of the US-imposed drug war.
The whereabouts of the missing students are still unknown.
More, HERE.
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Millions Missing From DEA Money-Laundering Operation

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 6, 2014

But No One With the Power to Investigate Seems to Care
At least $20 million went missing from money seizures by law enforcers, critical evidence was destroyed by a federal agency, a key informant was outed by a US prosecutor — contributing to her being kidnapped and nearly killed — and at the end of the day not a single narco-trafficker was prosecuted in this four-year-long DEA undercover operation gone awry.
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Charles Bowden has died, but his voice is louder than ever

Posted by Bill Conroy - September 2, 2014

As one of the original authentic journalists, he trailblazed a path for others to follow
When I heard that he had passed, my eyes welled with tears. I’m of stoic Irish stock, so I don’t shed tears easily, but the news of Charles Bowden’s death (1945-2014) was not an easy thing to bear. He had been a mentor and a friend to me for a decade, and his leaving hurts.
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Official US Cover-Up Still Obscures Motive for Juarez Consulate Murders

Posted by Bill Conroy - May 7, 2014
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U.S. Military: More Counter-Narcotics Funding Will Help Stem Exodus of Children from Central America

By Bill Conroy - July 29, 2014

 

Critics Argue Drug-War Money is Part of the Problem, Not the Solution.

 

Some 58,000 migrant children, mostly Central Americans, have made the treacherous journey to the U.S. southern border alone over the past 10 months, but actions being considered by U.S. officials to combat the problem with more military and drug-war aid to their countries, critics warn, may worsen the violence that provokes this unprecedented exodus.

The number of unaccompanied children that have arrived at the U.S. border so far this fiscal year is up 106 percent from the same period a year earlier — with the total expected to reach 90,000 before Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year.


To put that latter number in perspective, it is nearly five times larger than the number of Border Patrol agents now stationed along the entire southern border.

More, HERE.
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MORE NARCO NEWS, HERE

25 Deadliest Mass Shootings in U.S. History Fast Facts

By CNN Library; September 2, 2014
(CNN) -- Here is a list of the 25 deadliest single day mass shootings in U.S. history from 1949 to the present. If the shooter was killed or committed suicide during the incident that death is not included in the total.

Timeline:

32 killed - April 16, 2007 - Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. A gunman, 23-year-old student Seung-Hui Cho, goes on a shooting spree killing 32 people in two locations and wounds an undetermined number of others on campus. The shooter, Seung-Hui Cho then committed suicide.

27 killed - December 14, 2012 - Sandy Hook Elementary School - Newtown, Connecticut. Adam Lanza, 20, guns down 20 children, ages 6 and 7, and six adults, school staff and faculty, before turning the gun on himself. Investigating police later find Nancy Lanza, Adam's mother, dead from a gunshot wound. The final count is 28 dead, including the shooter.

23 killed - October 16, 1991 - In Killeen, Texas, 35-year-old George Hennard crashes his pickup truck through the wall of a Lubys Cafeteria. After exiting the truck, Hennard shoots and kills 23 people. He then commits suicide.

21 killed - July 18, 1984 - In San Ysidro, California, 41-year-old James Huberty, armed with a long-barreled Uzi, a pump-action shotgun and a handgun shoots and kills 21 adults and children at a local McDonalds. A police sharpshooter kills Huberty one hour after the rampage begins.

18 killed - August 1, 1966 - In Austin, Texas, Charles Joseph Whitman, a former U.S. Marine, kills 16 and wounds at least 30 while shooting from a University of Texas tower. Police officers Ramiro Martinez and Houston McCoy shot and killed Whitman in the tower. Whitman had also killed his mother and wife earlier in the day.

14 killed - August 20, 1986 - Edmond, Oklahoma part-time mail carrier, Patrick Henry Sherrill, armed with three handguns kills 14 postal workers in ten minutes and then takes his own life with a bullet to the head.

13 killed - November 5, 2009 - Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan kills 13 people and injures 32 at Fort Hood, Texas, during a shooting rampage. He is convicted and sentenced to death.

13 killed - April 3, 2009 - In Binghamton, New York, Jiverly Wong kills 13 people and injures four during a shooting at an immigrant community center. He then kills himself.

13 killed - April 20, 1999 - Columbine High School - Littleton, Colorado. 18-year-old Eric Harris and

17-year-old Dylan Klebold kill 12 fellow students and one teacher before committing suicide in the school library.

13 killed - September 25, 1982 - In Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 40-year-old George Banks, a prison guard, kills 13 people including five of his own children. In September 2011, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturns his death sentence stating that Banks is mentally incompetent.

13 killed - September 5, 1949 - In Camden, New Jersey, 28-year-old Howard Unruh, a veteran of World War II, shoots and kills 13 people as he walks down Camden's 32nd Street. His weapon of choice is a German-crafted Luger pistol. He is found insane and is committed to a state mental institution. He dies at the age of 88.

12 killed - September 16, 2013 - Shots are fired inside the Washington Navy Yard killing 12. The shooter, identified as Aaron Alexis, 34, is also killed.

12 killed - July 20, 2012 - Twelve people are killed and 58 are wounded in a shooting at an Aurora, Colorado, movie theater screening of the new Batman film. James E. Holmes, 24, is taken into custody outside of the movie theater. The gunman is dressed head-to-toe in protective tactical gear, set off two devices of some kind before spraying the theater with bullets from an AR-15 rifle, a 12-gauge shotgun and at least one of two .40-caliber handguns police recovered at the scene.

12 killed - July 29, 1999 - In Atlanta, 44-year-old Mark Barton kills his wife and two children at his home. He then opens fire in two different brokerage houses killing nine people and wounding 12. He later kills himself.

10 killed - March 10, 2009 - In Alabama, Michael McLendon of Kinston, kills 10 and himself. The dead include his mother, grandparents, aunt and uncle.

9 killed - March 21, 2005 - Red Lake High School, Red Lake, Minnesota. 16-year-old Jeff Weise kills his grandfather and another adult, five students, a teacher and a security officer. He then kills himself.

9 killed - June 18, 1990 - In Jacksonville, Florida, 42-year-old James Pough, angry about his car being repossessed, opens fire at at a General Motors Acceptance Corp. office, killing nine people. Pough takes his own life.

8 killed - October 12, 2011 - Eight people are killed during a shooting at the Salon Meritage in Seal Beach, California. The suspect, Scott Evans Dekraai, 41, of Huntington Beach, is arrested without incident as he is trying to leave the scene. The eight dead include Dekraai's ex-wife, Michelle Fournier, 48. He was armed with three guns -- a 9 mm Springfield, a Smith & Wesson .44 Magnum, and a Heckler & Koch .45 -- and was wearing body armor during the shooting rampage.

8 killed - August 3, 2010 - Manchester, Connecticut - Omar Thornton kills eight co-workers at Hartford Distributors before turning the gun on himself. Thornton had been asked to resign for stealing and selling alcoholic beverages.

8 killed - January 19, 2010 - Christopher Speight, 39, kills eight people at a house in Appomattox, Virginia. He surrenders to police at the scene the next morning, and is charged with one count of murder with additional charges pending.

8 killed - March 29, 2009 - In Carthage, North Carolina, 45-year-old Robert Stewart kills a nurse and seven elderly patients at a nursing home. In May, the Moore County district attorney announces she will seek the death penalty. On September 3, 2011, a jury finds Stewart guilty of second-degree murder. Stewart is sentenced to 141 to 179 years in prison.

8 killed - December 5, 2007 - In Omaha, Nebraska, 19-year-old Robert Hawkins goes to an area mall and kills eight shoppers before killing himself.

8 killed - July 1, 1993 - In San Francisco, 55-year-old Gian Luigi Ferri kills eight people in a law office and then kills himself.

8 killed - September 14, 1989 - In Louisville, Kentucky, 47-year-old Joseph Wesbecker armed with a AK-47 semiautomatic assault rifle, two MAC-11 semiautomatic pistols, a .38 caliber handgun, a 9-millimeter semiautomatic pistol and a bayonet kills eight co-workers at Standard Gravure Corporation and then kills himself. He had been placed on disability leave from his job due to mental problems.

8 killed - August 20, 1982 - In Miami, 51-year-old history teacher Carl Robert Brown, angry about a repair bill and armed with a shotgun, kills eight people at a machine shop. He flees by bicycle, but is shot in the back by a witness who pursued him. He was on leave from school for psychological treatment.

List of rampage killers (school massacres), by Wikipedia

List of school shootings in the United States, by Wikipedia

Starting with Pontiac's Rebellion school massacre on July 26, 1764 to August 6, 2014in River Woods Elementary when an 11-year-old student at RWES in Des Moines, Iowa, brought a BB gun to the school accompanied by two former students aged 11 & 16. The student admitted to having the weapon and making threats against 4 students. Police recovered the gun and arrested the alleged students
More, HERE.

America's Wars: U.S. Casualties and Veterans

The table below has information about the total number of service members, battle deaths, and nonmortal woundings in wars from 1775 to 2012; such as the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War I and II, Vietnam, and more
Information Please® Database, © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

67% of all homicides in the U.S. were conducted using a firearm: UN

According to the FBI, in 2012, there were 8,855 total firearm-related homicides in the US, with 6,371 of those attributed to handguns. 61% of all gun-related deaths in the U.S. are suicides. More, HERE by Wikipedia.

Crime in the United States

Crime in the United States has been present since colonization
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

© 2014 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Scandal in Mexico: A murky mortgage

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa Was a Crime of the State - See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Questions surround the purchase of a house owned by the finance minister

Dec 12th 2014

Mexico’s growing crisis: Reforms and democracy, but no rule of law

Nov 13th 2014

To save a promising presidency, Enrique Peña Nieto must tackle crime and corruption

From the print edition

DURING two years in office Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has received sharply contrasting reviews at home and abroad. Foreigners, including The Economist, have praised his structural reforms of the economy, which include an historic measure to open up energy to private investment (see article). Yet polls show that most Mexicans dislike Mr Peña. Among other things, they blame his government for a squeeze on living standards and the interlinked problems of violent crime and corruption. Sadly, recent events have lent support to Mr Peña’s domestic critics.

On November 8th Mexico’s attorney-general announced what almost everyone had already concluded: that 43 students from a teacher-training college in the southern state of Guerrero, who disappeared in the town of Iguala in late September, had been murdered by drug-traffickers after being kidnapped by the local police on the orders of the town’s mayor. Guerrero has been Mexico’s most violent state for centuries. The federal government bears no direct responsibility for these events. But Mexicans see in them a symbol of the failure of Mr Peña’s administration to make security a priority.

Now comes a problem that is uncomfortably close to home. The government had already opted to cancel a contract for a high-speed train that it had hastily awarded to the sole bidder, a consortium of Chinese and Mexican companies including a construction firm from the president’s home state. A local journalist has revealed that the boss of the same firm owns a $7m mansion that is the Peña family’s private residence (see article). The president denies any wrongdoing, but a common thread runs through these events.

Mexico only became a democracy in 2000, when seven decades of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the political machine that raised Mr Peña, were ended by electoral defeat. Unfortunately, democracy did not bring the rule of law to Mexico. Too many in the PRI still see the job of the police and the courts as enforcing political control, rather than investigating mobsters. Corrupt politicians are protected rather than punished. Organised crime and graft both remain a part of everyday life, and neither has been helped by the drugs flowing north to the United States.

More, HERE.
------------------

Victims of Mexico’s drug war

Tracing the missing

Many thousands disappeared in Mexico’s drug war. The government should do more to find them

Mexico’s economy

Jam mañana

A frustrating start to the year

May 24th 2014 | MEXICO CITY | From the print edition

SO FAR this year Mexico’s government has resembled one of the country’s many devotees of St Jude, patron saint of lost causes. It has doggedly stuck to a 3.9% 2014 growth forecast, even though its main export market, the United States, has been sluggish, and the twin pillars of its domestic economy—buying and building—have fared even worse.

On May 21st the central bank revised its growth prediction down to 2.3-3.3%, from 3-4% previously. The government was expected finally to follow suit on May 23rd, when first-quarter GDP figures were due to be released. Even so, officials are convinced that within months the benefits of its plans to modernise the economy will start to show up in the numbers.

 

Mexicans have good reason to be sceptical.

More, HERE.

 

Copyright © The Economist Newspaper Limited 2013. All rights reserved.

The Guardian

 

Snowden voted person of the year


Edward Snowden
In May Edward Snowden flew to Hong Kong where he gave journalists the material which blew the lid on the extent of US digital spying. Photograph: The Guardian/AFP/Getty Images

For the second year in a row, a young American whistleblower alarmed at the unfettered and at times cynical deployment of power by the world's foremost superpower has been voted the Guardian's person of the year.

Edward Snowden, who leaked an estimated 200,000 files that exposed the extensive and intrusive nature of phone and internet surveillance and intelligence gathering by the US and its western allies, was the overwhelming choice of more than 2,000 people who voted.

The NSA whistleblower garnered 1,445 votes. In a distant second, from a list of 10 candidates chosen by Guardian writers and editors, came Marco Weber and Sini Saarela, the Greenpeace activists who spearheaded the oil rig protest over Russian Arctic drilling. They received 314 votes. Pope Francis gained 153 votes, narrowly ahead of blogger and anti-poverty campaigner Jack Monroe, who received 144.
Snowden's victory was as decisive as Chelsea Manning's a year earlier.

More, HERE.

© 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.

latimes.com

Click on HERE to get the latest Los Angeles Times News

Infant found in suspect's SUV after police chase, gunfire

An infant was found in the vehicle of a domestic violence suspect early Saturday after a 5-mile-long pursuit that began and ended in an exchange of gunfire with police officers, the Long Beach Police Department said.

Four men found dead in car, gunman sought in San Francisco
Up to a million flood streets of Paris to defy Islamist terror

Paralyzing much of central Paris, the scale of the demonstration poses a mammoth security challenge in a capital city still on edge after the bloodiest week in recent history.

Slain gunman's girlfriend still eludes French authorities

Arsonists hit German paper that published French cartoons

Fledgling Paris terrorists fell through the cracks

Police pushed, cuffed Tamir Rice's sister after boy's shooting, video shows

Snake that slithered from toilet in San Diego may have been seeking wáter

Measles may have spread, Orange County officials warn

Obama proposes free community college for millions of students

Federal funding would cover 75% of tuition, with states picking up the rest of the tab. The program is modeled on initiatives in Tennessee and Chicago.

Legendary gospel artist Andrae Crouch dies at 72

Teen kidnapped, raped in San Gabriel Valley

Cannabis crazy: It doesn't just describe the move legalize weed. It could happen to you.

Is the high worth the lows?

Missing baby found dead in trash bin near San Diego

Woman, 39, killed in hit-and-run in South Los Angeles

Man hit by Red Line train Friday was 19-year-old from Burbank

Body found in park was that of man convicted of meeting minor for sex

People who fell from Commerce Casino were painters, fire officials say

Daum: Hollywood's idealized view of CIA officers is no substitute for reality

Moreno Valley police seeking dark-colored SUV after fatal hit-and-run

Man dies after being struck by SUV during fight in Anaheim parking lot

Activists demand charges in Ezell Ford, Omar Abrego shootings

Organized 'crash-and-grab' burglaries using vehicles plague Chicago

Police search for armed man seen firing 'recklessly' in West L.A.

Loaded beanbag shotgun missing from sheriff's patrol car; search underway

A loaded beanbag shotgun that’s capable of holding live shotgun rounds was reported missing Saturday from the trunk of a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department patrol car, and officials are calling on the public to help locate the potentially deadly weapon.

Two deaths leave Catalina Island shaken
Emily Foxhall

The loss of Tim Mitchell and Bruce Ryder, who died during the recent storm, leaves a small community numb with grief.

Infant missing from Long Beach home where 3 people found shot

Medical worker exposed to Ebola in Africa heads to Omaha for testing

California colleges see surge in efforts to unionize part-time faculty

Child survivor of Ky. plane crash walked alone through woods for help

No damage reported after 4.2, 3.0 earthquakes strike near Castaic

Second man charged with shooting at two LAPD officers

Prosecutors have charged a second suspect in connection with the shooting at a Los Angeles police patrol car Sunday night during an attack on a rival gang.

Police: Modesto man kills his wife, two adult children then himself

Man shot to death at Blue Line station in Compton

Two fetuses found beside San Diego County road

7-year-old girl is sole survivor of Kentucky plane crash, police say

Person fatally struck by Metro Red Line train in Studio City

5.1 Northern California earthquake: Biggest quake of 2015 (so far)

January 1, 2015

A 5.1 magnitude earthquake was reported off Northern California early Thursday, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

The quake occurred about 4:16 a.m.

The epicenter was in the Pacific Ocean about 70 miles west of Ferndale.
People as far away as Fort Bragg -- about 120 miles south of Ferndale -- reported feeling it, according to the USGS

More, HERE.

13 experts on what to expect in 2015

Mario Cuomo, former New York governor and fiery liberal, dies at 82

Security guard dead, two others shot at skating party

Hundreds of parents lose their children on Cape Town beaches

Man dies after being struck by SUV during fight in Anaheim parking lot

2 West Virginia police officers shot, wounded while stopping vehicle

Southern California's cold snap is expected to break this weekend

California's new laws for 2015: How are you affected?

Taking effect with the new year are hundreds of laws involving sick pay, guns, mothers, plastic bags, schools, gardens and other topics.

Divers to plunge into Java Sea as part of AirAsia recovery effort

15 destinations for travelers to set their sights on in 2015

December 27, 2014

As 2014 slips into history, these 15 destinations look better and better.

Some are nations, some are stations, some are cities and one is a mere neighborhood.

But in just about every case, there's something particularly compelling about them right now. Maybe it's because gasoline is so cheap (I'm thinking about you, Coachella Valley), or because hurricane recovery is marching along (Los Cabos, Mexico) or the French government has the tides figured out (Mont-St.-Michel) or perhaps (in the case of Choquequirao, Peru) because an aerial tram might change everything. Here are my picks for the new year:

Los Cabos, Mexico

In September, Hurricane Odile tore up huge chunks of Cabos San Lucas and San José del Cabo, closing more than half the area's lodgings, along with scores of restaurants and other businesses and the airport.

Kayaking off Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

But these twin towns at the tip of Baja have too much at stake to lie still. The airport and more than two dozen hotels reopened in October and November.

More, HERE.

Winter storm socks Southland with icy punch

People run for cover when freak winds hit Rose Bowl

Off Catalina, Harbor Patrol officer died trying to jump ashore

Southern California snow: Storm blankets mountains

Rose Parade: Spectators brave the cold; organizers make final adjustments

Thousands ring in new year at Grand Park party in downtown L.A.

On a blustery night, a large, diverse crowd gathers to listen to music, cram into photo booths and watch light shows on a 12-acre space stretching between City Hall and the Music Center.

Return of D.C. budget fights may cripple economic boom

For months, job creation, economic growth and consumer confidence have soared. The coming year could stop that trend

New L.A. police union president guided by bitter lessons in the past

L.A. violent crime rises for the first time in 12 years
Joel Rubin and Ben Poston

The most dramatic increase for 2014 is in aggravated assaults -- serious attacks that typically involve a weapon or serious injury -- which rose 24.2% compared with 2013.

Man accused of shooting at two LAPD officers charged

Poway man arrested on suspicion of attempted murder dies in jail

Pasadena employee accused of embezzling $6 million from city

Suspect in police pursuit runs across 710 Freeway

8 slain in Edmonton, Canada, in 'extreme case of domestic violence'

Earthquake: 3.1 quake strikes near Castaic, Calif.

Storm strands hundreds, fierce winds topple big rigs
Joseph Serna

Motorists are trapped, roads closed and trucks blown over by a powerful winter storm that's casting an icy shadow over Southern California's New Year.

2 dead, including Harbor Patrol officer, in rough seas off Catalina

Photos: Southern Californians share surprise snow on social media

Snow traps more than 130 motorists on mountain roads

Sierra Nevada snowpack levels are greater than a year ago

375 consecutive days with temperature over 60: The streak is over

'Gadget guy' helps LAPD with silent witnesses: surveillance cameras

Gunmen fire on LAPD patrol car in South L.A., prompting tactical alert

Richard Winton and Matt Stevens

One suspect is custody while a massive manhunt is underway for a second suspect, authorities say.

Two dead, three hurt in South L.A. shootings

Family chases down man who stole hearse with relative's casket inside

Protest against police killings draws crowds to Fairfax area

LAPD clears Times' garage of threat after bomb squad called

Death toll reaches 5 in Greek ferry fire

Obama says he's ready to use his veto pen

Surfer survives shark attack near San Luis Obispo

More chilly weather coming, with chance of rain and snow

Police officer kills black man near Ferguson; video captures incident

Oregon woman faces manslaughter charges in gruesome hit-and-run

Gov. Brown withdraws man's pardon after Times inquiry

In Iraq, displaced Christians gather for a somber Christmas

Whistle-blower cases cost California $89,000, state auditor reports

Obama glad 'Interview' released -- but will he watch it?

George Skelton: Asking Santa for politicians with guts

California regulator assails Obamacare cancellations

The state health exchange is violating the law by canceling private coverage for up to 95,000 people because they might qualify for Medi-Cal, the insurance chief says.

Christmas around the world

Christmas means tamale season in Southern California

Armed robber steals two English bulldog puppies

A gunman robbed a Pico Rivera pet shop of an undetermined amount of cash Wednesday and stole two English bulldog puppies worth $2,500 each, according to the Sheriff's Department.

Holiday travel at LAX: Santa, stress dogs and the possibility of delays

On the eve of a murder trial, a deal is struck. But will it stick?

Christopher Goffard

For Fred and Kathy Santos, a plea bargain for the killers of their 22-year-old son was a bitter pill. But it offered finality. Or so they thought.

86-year-old found fatally stabbed in bed in upscale L.A. neighborhood

FBI looking for suspect in 6 bank robbery cases in L.A. County

Algerian army kills man behind beheading of French hiker

Man who lived in storage unit full of child porn sentenced to prison

Economy grew at 5% annual rate in third quarter, best since 2003

Jonah Goldberg: The blame game in the New York cop killings shows a demonization double standard

Joe Cocker dies at 70; blues-rock singer wowed Woodstock

Randy Lewis

Cocker's life often played out the way his anguished hit interpretations sounded when he reinvented songs such as the Boxtops' 'The Letter' and the Beatles' 'With a Little Help From My Friends.'

2 indicted in violent Stockton bank robbery that left hostage dead

Man found dead on Venice Beach identified as 61-year-old L.A. resident

Thief steals child's wheelchair; shocked community gets her a new one

Protesters didn't cause slayings of New York police officers

3 dead, many injured after car rams crowd leaving Christmas concert

Three are killed and numerous others are injured when a suspected intoxicated driver plows into a crowd leaving a Christmas concert in Redondo Beach.

U.S. sues N.Y. City over treatment of young Rikers Island inmates

Nearing death, two people offer life lessons

Francine Orr

It's more than a year now since Evelyn and my father died. Some days I feel completely broken. Other days I feel like the weight of grief is lifting.

U.S.-Cuba thaw could erode Russia's influence

Carol J. Williams

If a reconciliation bolsters trade and economic collaboration across the Florida Strait, the political symbiosis between Havana and Moscow could wither.

Tears of joy, cries of 'traitor': Miami reacts to Obama's Cuba move

Ford expands Takata air bag recall to more than 500,000 cars

Napa quake's 'afterslip' could continue to cause damage

In Hong Kong, trams offer a ride like no others

Pakistan court grants bail to accused mastermind of Mumbai attacks

Detectives crack $10-million L.A. art heist; recover 9 paintings

Experts on North Korea see regime's fingerprints on Sony attack

Copyright 2014

MICHAEL MOORE

 

You Tube

Nixon before resignation and full speech, August 8, 1974

Protests in response to Israel’s assault on Gaza have drawn hundreds — and in some cases thousands — around the world.

 

Megyn Kelly To Dick Cheney: 'History Has Proven' You Were Wrong on Iraq Dick Cheney Kelly File.

 

You Tube

'Citizen Koch' ... the movie they didn't want you to see

Meet Governor(s) Pay-to Pay

 

Charles Baker, GOP nominee for governor in Massachusetts, gave $10,000 to New Jersey's Republican State Committee and hosted a fundraiser for Chris Christie – which happens to be flagrantly illegal, since Baker worked for a venture capital firm that shortly thereafter got a contract to manage New Jersey public pension funds

SPIEGEL ONLINE

Inside TAO: Documents Reveal Top NSA Hacking Unit

By SPIEGEL Staff

 

The article you are reading originally appeared in German in issue 1/2014 (December 30, 2013) of DER SPIEGEL.

 

Targeting Mexico

 

Mexico's Secretariat of Public Security, which was folded into the new National Security Commission at the beginning of 2013, was responsible at the time for the country's police, counterterrorism, prison system and border police. Most of the agency's nearly 20,000 employees worked at its headquarters on Avenida Constituyentes, an important traffic artery in Mexico City. A large share of the Mexican security authorities under the auspices of the Secretariat are supervised from the offices there, making Avenida Constituyentes a one-stop shop for anyone seeking to learn more about the country's security apparatus.

 

More, HERE.

Fresh Leak on US Spying: NSA Accessed Mexican President's Email

By Jens Glüsing, Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

'Royal Concierge': GCHQ Monitors Diplomats' Hotel Bookings

By Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

Quantum Spying: GCHQ Used Fake LinkedIn Pages to Target Engineers

Oil Espionage: How the NSA and GCHQ Spied on OPEC

Belgacom Attack: Britain's GCHQ Hacked Belgian Telecoms Firm

Cyber Attack: Belgians Angered by British Spying

By Gregor Peter Schmitz in Brussels

 

© SPIEGEL ONLINE 2013, All Rights Reserved

Fox News

US intelligence assets in Mexico reportedly tied to murdered DEA agent

SCM's Travel Advisory:


September 11 attacks on World Trade Center by Wikipedia

 

Mexicans are advised to exercise MAXIMUM CAUTION, monitor developments that might affect your safety in the United States because of Hate Crimes. The FBI reports that hate crimes against Latinos rose almost 40 percent between 2003 and 2006, and Hispanic activists say they are being targeted with threats and intimidation.

This is just a recent incident: STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- A rash of recent assaults on Mexican immigrants has heightened tensions in Port Richmond, already on edge following the savage beating of a 25-year-old baker earlier this (April 2010) month.

 

In addition, no matter what your nationality the US in under permanent risk of terrorism. Visitors could be caught up in attacks targeted at American, British, Canadian, Australian citizens, others. Terrorists may attack official or civilian targets. Crime rates are higher in the larger cities, such as New York, Los Angeles and Chicago.

 

Many parts of the United States are subject to different natural hazards, including earthquakes, fires or wildfires, floods, extreme heat, hurricanes, landslides and debris flow (mudslides), thunderstorms and lightning, tornadoes, tsunamis, volcanoes (Hawaii, Alaska and Pacific Northwest), winter storms (freezing rain, heavy snow and blizzards) and extreme cold.

 

Tourists are often targeted for petty crimes such as pick-pocketing and theft, particularly on public transport. It is recommended that before visiting your destination point, Google it and write NAME OF CITY TO BE VISITED, then "crime, areas to be avoided & gang activities" to determine your level of threat.  

Come Back Alive, a site dedicated to Dangerous Countries writes on quote: 

"There are more than 200 million guns in the possession of Americans. Most violent acts in the States are the result of robberies, domestic disputes and drug-related violence.

 

Terrorist acts, ranging from the killing of abortionist doctors to the bombing of the World Trade Center, are highly publicized but not considered a real threat to travelers. The threat of robbery or violent crime in inner cities and some tourist areas is real and should be taken seriously. Travel in America is considered safe (by .. Americans), and danger is confined to random violence and inner cities.

 

Those seeking adventure can find it in a New Orleans bar at five in the morning or strolling through South Central L.A. after midnight." .. 

TRAVEL ADVISORY: The Southern Poverty Law Center counted 932 active hate groups in the United States in 2009. Only organizations and their chapters known to be active during 2009 are included. More, HERE.

Oct. 29, 2009 Washington Post: Obama signs hate crimes law

You Tube

------------
HATE CRIMES

RACISM AND ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION, by ABC News

MEXICAN HATE RALLY

The New Sport: Latino Hate Crime, ABC News

Mexican beaten by 3 racist Blacks on Staten Island, New York

US Border Patrol Agent Shoots Dead Mexican Teen on Mexican Soil

Border agent details immigrant abuse

Discrimination Against Latinos

American Heritage- KKK Lynching

 

Redneck Attacks Mexican flag

 

-------------------------------------------

TERRORISM, DRUGS

New report exposes CIA torture & rendition by Nick Harper

MUST-READ Book: Cocaine Politics by Peter Dale Scott

Drugs and the Economy - Peter Dale Scott

Gary Webb on C.I.A. Trafficking of Cocaine

CIA Torture Jet crashed with 4 Tons of COCAINE

Former LA Police Officer Mike Ruppert Confronts CIA Director

'I don't think drug trafficking will ever be stopped': Inside the world of the U.S. agent who went undercover with the cartels:

Mail Online, UK

Celerino Castillo, by Wikipedia

Powderburns

Marijuana legalization wins majority support in poll: Los Angeles Times

Marijuana, Officially Legal in Colorado

In 2006, former Mexican president Felipe Calderón launched a massive crackdown against drug trafficking organizations, in conjunction with the United States. Since then, more than 40,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence: Council On

Foreign Relations

Washington State Gears Up for Marijuana Industry: Voice of America

Marijuana Legalization Canada: Liberal Party Lays Out Detailed Economic Plan For Pot: The Huffington Post, Canada

England Wants To Legalize Marijuana Through Cannabis Drug Reform: Inquisitr. Ltd.

More HERE.

A change of scenery by Washington Post

U.S. citizens traveling internationally in 2012, by destination

A change of scenery
Source: Office of Travel and Tourism Industries, Commerce Department. The Washington Post. Published on May 24, 2013

Image Credit

Mexico Travel Warning

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling to certain places in Mexico due to threats to safety and security posed by organized criminal groups in the country.
U.S. citizens have been the target of violent crimes, such as kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery by organized criminal groups in various Mexican states.  For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, which can vary, travelers should reference the state-by-state assessments further below.  This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.
General Conditions: 

Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year for study, tourism, and business, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day.  The Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations, and there is no evidence that organized criminal groups have targeted U.S. visitors or residents based on their nationality.  Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that are reported in the border region or in areas along major trafficking routes. 

Nevertheless, U.S. travelers should be aware that the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter organized criminal groups that engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico.  The groups themselves are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity.  Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur anywhere.  U.S. citizens have fallen victim to criminal activity, including homicide, gun battles, kidnapping, carjacking, and highway robbery.  While many of those killed in organized crime-related violence have themselves been involved in criminal activity, innocent persons have also been killed.  The number of U.S. citizens reported to the Department of State as murdered in Mexico was 71 in 2012 and 81 in 2013. 

Gun battles between rival criminal organizations or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico.  Gun battles have occurred in broad daylight on streets and in other public venues, such as restaurants and clubs.  During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily prevented from leaving the area. Criminal organizations have used stolen cars, buses, and trucks to create roadblocks on major thoroughfares, preventing the military and police from responding to criminal activity. The location and timing of future armed engagements is unpredictable.  We recommend that you defer travel to the areas specifically identified in this Travel Warning and exercise extreme caution when traveling throughout the other areas for which advisories are in effect.

The number of kidnappings throughout Mexico is of particular concern and appears to be on the rise.  According to statistics published by the Mexican Secretaria de Gobernacion (SEGOB), in 2013 kidnappings nationwide increased 20 percent over the previous year.  While kidnappings can occur anywhere, according to SEGOB, during this timeframe, the states with the highest numbers of kidnappings were Tamaulipas, Guerrero, Michoacán, Estado de Mexico, and Morelos.

Additionally, according to a widely publicized study by the agency responsible for national statistics (INEGI, the National Institute of Statistics and Geography), Mexico suffered an estimated 105,682 kidnappings in 2012; only 1,317 were reported to the police.  Police have been implicated in some of these incidents.  Both local and expatriate communities have been victimized.  Nearly 70 kidnappings of U.S. citizens were reported to the U.S. Embassy and consulates in Mexico between January and June of 2014.
U.S. citizens are encouraged to lower their personal profiles and to avoid displaying indicators of wealth such as expensive or expensive-looking jewelry, watches, or cameras.  U.S. citizens are encouraged to maintain awareness of their surroundings and avoid situations in which they may be isolated or stand out as potential victims.

Kidnappings in Mexico have included traditional, "express," and "virtual" kidnappings. Victims of traditional kidnappings are physically abducted and held captive until a ransom is paid for release.  "Express" kidnappings are those in which a victim is abducted for a short time and forced to withdraw money, usually from an ATM, then released.  A "virtual" kidnapping is an extortion-by-deception scheme wherein a victim is contacted by phone and convinced to isolate themselves from family and friends until a ransom is paid.  The victim is coerced (by threat of violence) to remain isolated and to provide phone numbers for the victim's family or loved ones.  The victim's family is then contacted and a ransom for the "kidnapped" extracted.  Recently, some travelers to Mexico staying at hotels as guests have been targets of such "virtual" kidnapping schemes.
Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments.  U.S. government personnel are specifically prohibited from patronizing these establishments in the states of Coahuila, Durango, Zacatecas, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosi, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas.

Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the border region, and U.S. citizens have been murdered in such incidents.  Most victims who complied with carjackers' demands have reported that they were not physically harmed.

Carjackers have shot at vehicles that have attempted to flee.  Incidents have occurred during the day and at night, and carjackers have used a variety of techniques, including roadblocks, bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop, and running vehicles off the road at high speeds.  There are indications that criminals target newer and larger vehicles, especially dark-colored SUVs.  However, even drivers of old sedans and buses coming from the United States have been targeted.  While violent incidents can occur anywhere and at any time, they most frequently occur at night and on isolated roads.  To reduce risk when traveling by road, we strongly urge you to travel between cities throughout Mexico only during daylight hours, to avoid isolated roads, and to use toll roads ("cuotas") whenever possible. 

The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat organized criminal groups.  U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways by car or bus may encounter government checkpoints, staffed by military or law enforcement personnel.  In some places, criminal organizations have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and have killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them.  You should cooperate at all checkpoints. 

The Department imposes restrictions on U.S. government employees' travel in Mexico.  Since July 2010, USG employees are prohibited from driving on non-official travel from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior of Mexico or Central America.  One exception is that personal travel by motor vehicle is permitted on Highway 15 toll road between Hermosillo and Nogales during daylight hours.
U.S. government personnel and their families are prohibited from personal travel to all areas to which it is advised to "defer non-essential travel".  When travel for official purposes is essential, it is conducted with extensive security precautions.  U.S. government personnel and their families are allowed to travel for personal reasons to the areas where no advisory is in effect or where the advisory is to exercise caution.  While the general public is not forbidden from visiting places categorized under "defer non-essential travel," U.S. government personnel will not be able to respond quickly to an emergency situation in those areas due to security precautions that must be taken by U.S. government personnel to travel to those areas. 

For more information on road safety and crime along Mexico's roadways, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information

State-by-State Assessment: 

Below is a state-by-state assessment of security conditions throughout Mexico.  Travelers should be mindful that even if no advisories are in effect for a given state, crime and violence can still occur.  For general information about travel and other conditions in Mexico, see our Country Specific Information.

More, HERE

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The New York Times

From Frommer's

Introduction to Mexico
The Best Cultural Experiences
The Best Beach Vacations
The Best Active Vacations
The Best Places to Get Away from It All
Getting There
Getting Around
Fast Facts
In One Week
In Two Weeks

MEXICO POPULAR DESTINATIONS 

See All 37 Destinations

Acapulco

Baja California

Cabo San Lucas

Campeche

Cancun

Chichen Itza

Colima

Mexico City

Yucatan Peninsula

MORE MEXICO TRAVEL, HERE.

© 2013 The New York Times Company

The Naturalization Process and Current Trends in Immigration in the United States: By Gender, By Age and By Marital Status

In 2011, the total number of persons naturalizing was 694,193. The leading countries of birth of new citizens were Mexico (94,783), India (45,985), the Philippines (42,520), the People's Republic of China (32,864), and Colombia (22,693). The largest number of persons naturalizing lived in California (151,183), Florida (87,309), and New York (76,603).

Historical trends have shown that the average number of persons that are naturalized annually has increased from less than 120,000 during the 1950s and 1960s to 210,000 during the 1980s, to 500,000 during the 1990s, and to 680,000 between 2000 and 2009. Naturalizations rose sharply during the mid-1990s because of various factors that include: 1) the 2.7 million undocumented immigrants legalized under the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 making them eligible for citizenship; 2) legislative efforts to restrict public benefits for non-citizens; and 3) the implementation of a mandatory program requiring replacement of permanent resident cards issued before 1977.

More, HERE.

 

Information submitted by Cooper Brimm, American Immigration Center

16 Ways to Get Through the Airport Faster

With airports that seem busier than ever, airline staffing reductions creating longer lines at check-in and airport security wait times that can be entirely unpredictable, these days the old airport "two-hour" rule often leaves just minutes to spare to buy a magazine, grab a snack or hustle your kids into the bathroom. Saving a few extra minutes here and there along the way can add up in your favor; here are 16 tips to get you from your front door to your seat on the plane as quickly and painlessly as possible -- as well as some ideas to keep you moving no matter what is going on with your flight.

More, HERE

© 2013 The Independent Traveler, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

15 Travel Tips to Get Through TSA Security


The savviest of travelers understand the security requirements and plan ahead. In the United States, airport security is run by the Transportation Security Administration, a division of the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees border security as well as technological research, response to national disasters and terrorism, and intelligence analysis.

 

These tips reflect TSA policies as of November 2012. And for students enrolled in a homeland security program, knowing this information is vital and applicable to your future career.

 

More, HERE.

 

© 2013, Master of Homeland Security

COMMUNITY NEWS

¿DE VISITA EN ZIPOLITE, OAXACA?

Restaurante La Pasión by Trip Advisor

La PasiOn

Jaime Díaz Arguelles
La Pasión, Col. Roca Blanca
Tel. no. 9581091824
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Restaurante El Alquimista by Trip Advisor

Marisquería, Pasta & Pizza
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La Naval
Insurgentes Sur 373,
Esquina con Michoacán
Col. Exhipódromo Condesa
Tel. 55 84 3500. Servicio a Domicilio: 5584-3144
e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
CATAS: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Panadería La Espiga


INSURGENTES SUR 455, HIPODROMO CONDESA, CUAUHTEMOC, C.P. 06170, DF. Tel: (55)5564-7763

Ir al metro Chilpancingo es una de mis aventuras favoritas porque puedo visitar la panadería La Espiga. Este lugar lleva más de veinte años en el mismo lugar y tiene cosas deliciosas que ofrecer. Su tamaño es enorme, y dentro puedes encontrar comida, refrescos y bebidas, postres, entre otras cosas. El primer pasillo tiene papas y comida chatarra que puedes consumir. El segundo pasillo tiene todos los refrescos y las aguas al tiempo, en el fondo podrás encontrar los refrigeradores que tienen los refrescos y aguas frías, así como hielo. Más, AQUI.

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Autos con 15 Años de Antiguedad Dejarán de Circular en el D. F. Dos Veces a la Semana

http://www.solucionpolitica.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/hoy-no-circula.jpg

CREDITO DE LA IMAGEN: SOLUCION POLITICA

 

Cars Older than 15 Years will not circulate twice a Week
Tanya Müller García
Tanya Muller García, Secretaria del Medio Ambiente del Distrito Federal

 

Mexico City's Environment Secretariat

HOY NO CIRCULA

New Program of (Your Car) Does not Circulate in Mexico City. More information, HERE by Wikipedia

S P E C I A L   A N N O U N C E M E N T
Olivier Tschumi
Olivier Tschumi, a Swiss citizen, relocated to Mexico 22 years ago. He was kidnapped while jogging with his two dogs in a park north of Cuernavaca in the morning of December 19, 2010. A ransom was paid to the kidnappers on December 21 of same year, but Olivier continues to be in captivity to this date. Authorities have no leads to the kidnappers.

Security Corner in Mexico has been requested by Mr. Tschumi's family in Switzerland to have this information available to our readers in the event you happen to know or hear of Olivier's whereabouts. The Mexican Federal Attorney General's Office (PGR) is offering $5 million pesos as a reward to anybody providing information that will lead to the whereabouts of Mr. Tschumi

If you have any information, please write to Olivier's sister ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). Olivier has a 12-year old waiting to hear from you too. More information, in Spanish HERE
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Olivier Tschumi, citoyen suisse, s'est installé au Mexique il y a 22 ans. Au matin du 19 décembre 2010,  Il a été enlevé  lors d'un jogging avec ses deux chiens dans une forêt au nord de Cuernavaca. Une rançon a été payée selon les exigences des ravisseurs le 21 décembre de la même année. Olivier n'a pas été libéré, il a disparu depuis ce jour. L'enquête, menée par les  autorités mexicaines piétine.  Désespérée, la famille Tschumi en Suisse implore l'aide de tout le monde pour retrouver Olivier. Toute information concernant les ravisseurs et  sa localisation sera utile et  bienvenue. La famille d'Olivier a grand besoin de votre aide et vous remercie.

Le Bureau du procureur général fédéral mexicain offre $ 5.000.000 pesos en récompense à qui fournira des informations conduisant à retrouver Monsieur Tschumi. Si vous avez des informations, s'il vous plaît écrivez à la sœur d'Olivier, Email:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Olivier a une fille de 12 ans qui espère retrouver son papa grâce à votre aide! Plus d'informations en espagnol ICI


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Culture of Safe Travel, Crime & Loss Prevention

 

VIDEOS

 

INTRODUCTION (English language) 

INTRODUCCION A ESQUINA DE LA SEGURIDAD


PREVENTING KIDNAPPING EXPRESS IN MEXICO CITY

MEXICO CITY SUBWAY SYSTEM, SAFE, EFFICIENT, INEXPENSIVE


WORDS OF ADVISE FROM SUBWAY SECURITY PERSONNEL

 

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Mexico City Hash House Harriers

 

INTERNATIONAL DRINKING Jarra CLUB WITH A RUNNING PROBLEM

www.mchhh.com

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www.mchhh.com

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SOCIAL SERVICES

 

Cuernavaca's Center for Happy Sr. Citizens, contributing to the enhancement of life quality. Monday to Friday: 8AM to 14:00 hrs. Among other courses specially designed for the elderly: literature, history, philosophy, IT, English, Spanish, artistic workshops: music, painting, cuisine, manual art; sports and entertainment: dancing, zumba, danzon, yoga, aqua-aerobics, reading. Emotions' handling, conferences, legal advise for inheritance, tanatology.

More information: Río Amacuzac 435, Col. Vistahermosa, tels. (01- 777) 221-6250(01- 777) 221-6250 (01- 777) 221-6250Contact person: Alejandra Morales Leija

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American Benevolent Society

 

American Benevolent Society Newsletter by American_Benevolent

Paseo de la Reforma 1870-201 Lomas de Chapultepec, Miguel Hidalgo. Mexico, D.F. 11000 Mexico

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New "HOY NO CIRCULA" rules go into effect Tuesday, July 1, 2014‏

 

Here's an explanation of how the new program "hoy no circula" works, starting TUESDAY, July 1st

 

If you have any information that is different from this PLEASE let us know right away so we can send it out. Brand new vehicles that have the hologram 00 are able to drive for two years, the car will have to update the hologram  at the expiration date and be inspected . You have two months after the expiration date to renew the hologram (have the car inspected).
Hologram 0, if your vehicle does not pass the 00 you will be given the hologram 0.  You can still drive everyday of the month, but instead of the two years permit, the expiration is set for six months, then you will have to renew the hologram. For information on the dates of the renewal, the link of the government will be posted at the end of the mail.
Hologram 1, this hologram is usually for vehicles between 9 and 15 years of usage. the vehicles with the hologram number 1 will not be able to circulate two Saturdays a month and one day on midweek. (the Saturday depends on the license plate of the car, see the government link for more details) and one day on midweek that also depends on the license plate of the car.

And there will be the new hologram 2.

According to the news of El Universal vehicles with the hologram number 2 that are over 15 years in circulation will not be able to circulate any Saturday of the month and also one day midweek.

 

It seems that the government is willing to change the hologram 2 for the hologram 1 if the vehicles pass the regulation test. This regulation will start on Tuesday July 1st. of 2014.  For more details here is the link of the news. And here is the link for the government program "Hoy no circula"

Talking history: The American Benevolent Society turns 140 by Catherine Dunn, Insidemex

History

Oprima ESTE ENLACE electrónico para ver las noticias actualizadas de México de CNN en Español de esta fecha

Últimas noticias

El DF será... ¿una ciudad con delegados suplentes?

América vence 3-2 al León Mediotiempo.com

El Palacio de Buckingham abrirá sus puertas a Peña

Un hombre de confianza de 'el Viceroy' es detenido

México abre la temporada de 'chapulines' políticos

El IFT multa a Telmex con 14.4 mdp por caso Dish

SCT y OCDE firman acuerdo de transparencia para nuevo aeropuerto Obrasweb.mx

4 comisionados del IFAI 'guardan' su patrimonio

Al menos 11 muertos en México debido al frío

¿Qué revelarían las cajas negras del vuelo QZ8501?

Futbol Mexicano: Checa los resultados de la Jornada 1 mediotiempo.com

Chivas 'enseña' a sus jugadores a usar sus redes

Un bloguero recibe latigazos por insultar al islam

Zuckerberg habla sobre el atentado a 'Charlie Hebdo'

14 propósitos digitales para Año Nuevo

Floome, un alcoholímetro digital en tu bolsillo

'Birdman', favorita de los BAFTA

Hijo de Jackie Chan, 6 meses a la cárcel por drogas

Vacunas contra el ébola, seguras y por usarse: OMS

Mundo

Células terroristas en Francia 'despertaron'

Anonymous le declara la guerra al terrorismo

¿Por qué el islam prohíbe imágenes de Mahoma?

Unidad y solidaridad para desafiar el terrorismo

Más de un millón de personas y decenas de líderes mundiales tomaron Francia tras tres días de terrorismo en el país Ir a la nota

EN FOTOS: Francia marcha en contra de la violencia

© 2006 Derechos Reservados Expansión, S.A. DE C.V.

El Universal has no official political affiilation and is the most read newspaper in Mexico

Oprima AQUI para ver noticias actualizadas del periódico El Universal

El Mundo

París: calculan hasta 1.5 millones en manifestación

El Ministerio francés del Interior indicó que la manifestación 'no tiene precedentes', aunque anunció que todavía es demasiado temprano para ofrecer cifras estimativas

Miles marchan en París en rechazo al terrorismo

Autor de toma de rehenes en París dejó video póstumo

París es hoy la capital del mundo: Hollande

EU organizará cumbre global de seguridad: Holder

Fiscalía vincula balas en ataques en París

Polémico humorista francés presente en protestas de París

Ministros de Europa y EU en lucha común contra terrorismo

Video Club de Prensa: ¿Es también culpable Francia?

Video Miles marchan en silencio en Francia por atentados

Video Momento en que abaten a terrorista de tienda en París

Estados

Este lunes reanudarán clases en Tierra Caliente

Luego de los hechos violentos registrados en la región de Apatzingán, autoridades educativas, confirmaron que será este 12 de enero cuando se reanuden las actividades en el nivel básico

Nación

Da ISSSTE dos mil licencias para "grilla"

En el Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE) al menos ocho familias de integrantes del actual Comité Ejecutivo Nacional de su sindicato y ex dirigentes gremiales gozan del privilegio de cobrar un sueldo y no tener que ir a trabajar

Video "El ISSSTE está envejecido y deteriorado"

Nación

Sistema anticorrupción, prioridad para PRI: Beltrones

El coordinador del tricolor en la Cámara de Diputados indióc que las reformas en esta materia son parte integral de las reformas transformadoras de Enrique Peña Nieto

Sistema anticorrupción, prioridad para PRI: Beltrones

Video "El ISSSTE está envejecido y deteriorado"

Los escándalos pegan a partidos

Aquí dan licencias para... no trabajar

Venden dólar en 14.45 pesos en promedio en AICM

A la venta, la mayor cotización de la divisa es de 14.75 pesos, mientras que a la compra en un mínimo de 13.80 pesos

No podemos tirarnos al piso por crudo: Gurría

Fallece la actriz Anita Ekberg, musa de Fellini

De no existir previa autorización, queda expresamente prohibida la publicación, retransmisión, edición y cualquier otro uso de los contenidos de El Universal



Proceso is a weekly magazine, renowned for its left-wing journalism

Oprima AQUI para ver las noticias actualizadas de la revista Proceso de esta fecha

Repudian miles el terrorismo en marcha histórica en París

Ordena INE retiro de spot del PRD por quejas de Televisa y López Dóriga

PRD retira spot de precampaña con imágenes del caso Ayotzinapa

Cae “El Canario”, presunto operador del Cártel Independiente de Acapulco

Crece protesta en Oaxaca; maestros toman aeropuertos y gasolinerías
Ejecutan a cuatro personas en Zihuatanejo
Hombre asesina a su esposa y se suicida tras encontrarle conversaciones en WhatsApp
PROCESO 1993
Edición 1993; 10 de Enero, 2015

Editorial

La  muerte, audaz, enluta de nuevo a Proceso. Julio Scherer García se va de la mano de Vicente Leñero, su compañero y amigo. El dolor repetido, sin pausa, lacera las entrañas y no hay manera de evadirlo. La …

Reporte Especial

Morir a tiempo

Apasionado del trabajo periodístico hasta sus últimos momentos, Julio Scherer García dejó escritas estas desgarradoras páginas, testimonios crudos de sus vivencias en medio de las enfermedades y el sufrimiento que lo agobiaron desde julio de 2012 hasta la madrugada …

Que tu amor me alcance en el camino

Cada mañana llego a tu casa con angustia porque sé que uno de estos días se dará el último encuentro entre nosotros. Es hasta el primer instante en que nos miramos que renuevas mi esperanza, estirándola veinticuatro horas más. …

El periodismo frente al poder

De Gustavo Díaz Ordaz a Enrique Peña Nieto, ningún presidente le fue ajeno a Julio Scherer García. Fueron ocho los mandatarios que pasó a cuchillo. Habló con ellos, los confrontó con su afilada voz primero, con su penetrante mirada …

Treinta y cinco años alrededor de Julio*

En 2007, el consejo rector de la Fundación Nuevo Periodismo Iberoamericano (FNPI) otorgó un reconocimiento al mexicano Julio Scherer García, el colombiano José Salgar, el brasileño Clóvis Rossi y el uruguayo Hermenegildo Sábat, quienes a su juicio “encarnan los …

Congruentes hasta el último instante

“Cuénteme algo, don Salvador”. Así comenzaban nuestros encuentros casi siempre. La petición era difícil. Me enfrentaba al deber de contarle algo que no supiera. Y eso era imposible. En don Julio se sintetizaba la esencia del reportero: obsesión, curiosidad, …

¡Disfrute su trabajo!

–¡Qué carajos con usted, don Carlos! ¡Disfrute su trabajo! Lo perfecto es enemigo de lo bueno. Haga cosas buenas y disfrute lo que hace. Su perfeccionismo lo paraliza. Lo hace inútil. ¡Su nota es una chingonería! –me gritó molesto …

La lección

El atardecer de Marcos, el título de la portada de Proceso del 6 de enero de 1996, fue el centro de la conversación. Hacía dos años del surgimiento del Ejército Zapatista y de un hombre que había decidido …

El comandante y el periodista

–¿Cómo está Julio Scherer? –preguntó en tono amable Fidel Castro cuando me ubicó entre un grupo de corresponsales extranjeros que a principios de 1997 buscaba entrevistarlo tras concluir un acto público en La Habana. –Don Julio está bien …

Aquella portada

Era 1995. Tenía escasos meses de haber ingresado a Proceso y tuve la oportunidad de cubrir el conflicto armado en Chiapas. A mi regreso a la Ciudad de México logré el sueño de cualquier fotógrafo: ¡la portada de Proceso! …

Frente al caso Regina

“No les creemos y no les vamos a creer hasta que nos aclaren qué pasó con nuestra compañera Regina Martínez”, le soltó Julio Scherer al gobernador de Veracruz, Javier Duarte, para detener su estéril discurso. Duarte se quedó …

Honestidad avasallante

Dicen que en el cielo hay fiesta y en la tierra orfandad. Eran las tres de la mañana del jueves 8. Sin saber por qué, me mantenía en vigilia, repasando el silencio del panteón francés. Recordé un féretro, impersonal, …

Multiplicado al infinito

En 1986 un grupo de fotógrafos renunciamos al medio en el que trabajamos para fundar la agencia de información fotográfica Imagenlatina. En poco tiempo recibimos el apoyo de don Julio Scherer que abre las puertas de la revista Proceso …

La piel y la entraña del periodista

El encuentro con Sandra Ávila Beltrán, conocida como La Reina del Pacífico, dejó en Julio Scherer García una huella que rebasó lo profesional. Así me lo confió él en alguna plática, cuando me invitaba un café en un establecimiento …

La cumbre y el abismo

Aquella semana Proceso llevaba en portada un reportaje con mi firma, pero el director, Julio Scherer García, estaba furioso conmigo. Bajaba las escaleras para irse a comer cuando dio conmigo en la redacción de Fresas 13. –Su trabajo …

Dormir menos, escribir más

“¡Atoyac, doña Leticia, Atoyac! Cuénteme de Atoyac”, me saludaba con frecuencia don Julio, en su ansia permanente por saber. Certero para establecer los puntos de encuentro con cada reportero de Proceso, don Julio era dueño de una enorme …

El mayor trofeo, un paraguas

Nunca me tomé una foto con don Julio. Siempre me intimidó el tamaño de tal personaje, un ser histórico pasando frente a mí. Sabido era por todos su animadversión por las fotografías y las derramadas pleitesías. Llegué a …

Las pisadas del escritor

“Quiero que escriba lo que usted vio, señora”, me dijo don Julio desde el otro lado del teléfono ese diciembre de 2010. A Diego Fernández de Cevallos lo habían secuestrado siete meses antes, un 14 de mayo. En …

Biblioteca inagotable

Washington.- En la redacción escuchaba la plática sobre Vicente Fox entre Álvaro Delgado y Pepe Gil Olmos, cuando de pronto apareció don Julio: “Don Álvaro, don Pepe, señor Esquivel. ¿Qué dice de nuevo el poder en Washington?”, me cuestionó …

Su abrazo

En enero de 2010 me enviaron a Puerto Príncipe a cubrir la devastación ocasionada por un sismo de 7 grados que sacudió a Haití, el país más pobre de América. A mi regreso a México me reincorporé a …

El periodismo es cabrón

Era mediodía y el sol quemaba afuera de Fresas 13. Alcancé a don Julio en la puerta de Proceso, poco antes de que subiera a su Jetta azul marino. – ¿Le robo un minuto, don Julio? –¡Róbeme los que …

Su Lettera gris

Don Julio, como siempre le dijimos en la redacción de Proceso, tecleaba sus textos en una máquina de escribir. De hecho tenía dos Olivetti que usaba indistintamente en la revista o en su casa. Hasta donde sé nunca escribió …

Historia de una foto

El 12 de agosto de 2008 por la noche, cuando nos retirábamos del departamento de fotografía, recibimos una llamada del subdirector Salvador Corro. Buscaba a nuestro coordinador, Marco Antonio Cruz, para que acompañara a don Julio a una entrevista; …

Estaré a tu lado

MADRID.- Al otro lado de la línea telefónica, don Julio Scherer me dijo: “Cualquiera que sea tu decisión, yo estaré a tu lado. Cogido de tu brazo. Toda la revista lo está, ya lo viste. Lo sabes bien. Estoy …

Puedo salir adelante sin Dios…

El séptimo día del abril de 2014, su cumpleaños 88, le preguntaron a don Julio por qué este país había soportado tanto. Nadie como él había desentrañado los abusos perpetrados desde el poder y, en la última entrada de …

La modestia de un gigante

Cuando por primera vez estreché la diestra de don Julio, en 1992, me estrujó la misma impresión que había tenido al ser presentado con otros dos personajes: Sergio Méndez Arceo (1972) y Heberto Castillo (1984). Se trataba de una …

Cuando Rodin miró a Julio

PARÍS.- Durante muchos años don Julio fue para mí El Director. Le temía, lo admiraba y lo respetaba. Me abrumaba y me intimidaba. Por supuesto a veces me hacía enojar y eso parecía divertirlo mucho. También me retaba. En …

¿Tiene material? ¡Adelante!

Don Julio Scherer García cruzó el acceso principal del edificio de Proceso, en Fresas número 13. Era la mañana del lunes 28 de enero de 2008. El fundador de este semanario recibió al reportero con su acostumbrado par de …

Yanquis contra Mets

No recuerdo la fecha exacta en la que conocí a don Julio, pero fue en 2001. Ese año tuve el privilegio de ser contratada en Proceso, la revista que comencé a leer en 1988 cuando la UNAM estaba en …

Sobre la muerte

–¿En qué piensa, don Alejandro? –En que yo sí pude despedirme de mi hermano, de mi papá. Y en que Javier (Sicilia) no pudo despedirse de su hijo… Asistíamos a la velación de Juanelo, el asesinado hijo de nuestro …

Cómo no deslumbrarse

Un reportero no debe deslumbrarse con nadie, sobre todo si el encuentro puede ser noticiable. Claro que se puede sentir, secretamente, la emoción por la noticia y, en algunos casos, el desprecio por el interlocutor, pero a fuerza de …

La entrevista que sí fue

“¡Ya váyase, don Rodrigo, ya váyase! ¿Qué sigue haciendo aquí?”, me presionaba, en agosto de 1992, don Julio Scherer para viajar a Brasil y entrevistar al escritor brasileño Jorge Amado con motivo del homenaje nacional que se le hacía …

La risa del maestro

Sé que la vida sigue, pero después de una pérdida nunca es igual. He tenido algunas en mi vida, personales. Esta es mi primera pérdida periodística entrañable. No fui de su círculo cercano, pero don Julio tuvo unos …

Televisa, “arma de la manipulación”

El lunes 25 de octubre de 2005, por la mañana, recibí una llamada de Ángeles Morales, nuestro ángel de la guarda en Proceso. En la edición del domingo acabábamos de publicar las revelaciones del convenio recién firmado entre Televisa, …

Don Julio

BUENOS AIRES.- Durante muchos años, aunque nos viéramos seguido éramos don Julio y don Miguel. “Hola, don Julio”, “Don Miguel, carajo, que gusto verlo”, “Lo mismo digo, don Julio”. Pasaron años antes de que mandáramos a la mierda …

Esa letra menuda…

“Don Rafaele” –me decía en voz baja–. “¿Cómo se hace cuando el poder legal choca contra el poder impuesto?” –Pues lo legal pierde el poder, don Julio. Era la madrugada del 8 de julio de 1976. Los golpistas de …

Adiós don Julio

Durante poco más de 10 años, entre 2001 y 2012, nos reuníamos periódicamente a comer y conversar, Julio Scherer, Gabriel García Márquez, Ignacio Solares y yo. Hasta 2007, las reuniones eran habitualmente en la Universidad. Comida de altura, las …

El profesor de periodismo

El ángulo que me tocó vivir de don Julio fue el de profesor de periodismo. Casi lo miro entrar a ese salón de la planta baja de aquella Universidad Iberoamericana que después se derrumbó. Era el año de 1972, …

La obra editorial de Julio Scherer*

Reacio a ser el centro de la atención pública, Julio Scherer García aceptó en buena hora el doctorado Honoris Causa que le otorgó la Universidad de Guadalajara, y el homenaje a su obra editorial realizado en la XIX Feria …

En recuerdo de Scherer

Julio Scherer ha fallecido. Nos deja desolados en un vacío terrible. Supo erigirse en la conciencia periodística nacional, tarea enorme, valiente, en un país donde privan impunidad y corrupción extendidas. Scherer, estudioso del derecho, la filosofía y la …

Encuentros con Julio

Su abrazo era como el abrazo del mundo. Tenía una cierta manera lateral de mirar, entrecerrando los ojos, escudriñando al interlocutor, penetrando su alma. Ladeaba el rostro, se tocaba la frente –la mente– y estallaba: de júbilo por una …

Scherer o lo excepcional

En cualquier país, un individuo con la vocación, la inteligencia y la pasión de Julio Scherer hubiera sido un periodista de renombre, pero en el México de la segunda mitad del siglo XX y lo que va del actual, …

El vacío

Ha muerto Julio Scherer y con él una gran generación de periodistas mexicanos despide a una de sus principales figuras, distinguida por su productiva, aguerrida y aleccionadora lucha por el periodismo de investigación, además de la libertad de prensa …

“¿Voy bien o me regreso?”

Ser escritor de ficción es sentarse en casa frente a la hoja en blanco, a ver qué sale. Ser periodista es escribir “a huevo”, mirar el reloj, narrar la historia, sintetizar, nada de dejarse llevar por la lírica, mirar …

Rostros de Julio Scherer

Siempre he amado a los vitalistas. La literatura está llena de ellos –Nietszche, Albert Camus–. Pero a lo largo de mi vida sólo me ha sido concedido conocer y entablar amistad con dos: Rubén Salazar Mallén y Julio Scherer. …

El más creyente

Ignacio Solares tiene dificultades para escribir los pasajes que vivió con Julio Scherer y Vicente Leñero desde que comenzó a colaborar con ellos en la década de los setenta, en el periódico Excélsior, y luego en Proceso. “No me …

Más, AQUI.
PROCESO 1992
Edición 1992; 3 de Enero, 2015

PROCESO 1991

Edición 1991; 27 de Diciembre, 2014

PROCESO 1990

Edición 1990; 20 de Diciembre, 2014

PROCESO 1988

The Mexican government, welcomed as a partner of the Canadian and U.S. governments in continental economic development and security, also happens to partner in the slaughter of its own people. The murders and disappearances of the students from the Rural Normal “Raúl Isidro Burgos,” of Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, Mexico on September 26, 2014 in Iguala, was a crime of the state, as hundreds of thousands of Mexicans have claimed in their protests.
The governmental investigation that followed the September 2014 attack on these students has been deliberately incompetent and not aimed at getting to the roots of the crime that are, in fact, the tangled web of state-drug gang corruption and the state’s dirty war in defense of the neoliberal transformation of Mexico. The investigation has been staged, quite ineffectively, as a public relations operation to calm foreign investors and to cool protests, efforts that have completely failed within Mexico. By claiming that the blame was at the local level (the corrupt collusion of a local mayor and his avaricious wife with a brutal cartel) the national government seeks to present itself as the defender of justice.
But as Luis Hernández Navarro shows in his article “La matanza de Iguala y el Ejército” (The Iguala Massacre and the Army), there is—and has long been—a deep entanglement between the army, the local government of Iguala, and drug production. Guerrero  accounts for more than 60% of the Mexican production of poppies and opium gum for making heroin, and the cities of Iguala and Chilpancingo are key centers for its storage and transportation.
- See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa Was a Crime of the State

- See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Edición 1988; 6 de Diciembre, 2014

© 2013 Proceso

 

 

Last Updated on Sunday, 18 January 2015 12:03
 
MEXICO: Communities Up In Arms, By Prof. Lorena Ojeda, CLAS, Berkeley University; Mexican Judge Frees 2 Witnesses To Army Killings; Mexico Vows To Sell Dollars To Halt Peso's Slide; A Murky Mortgage: The Economist
Sunday, 23 November 2014 10:42

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The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners - Public Service

For a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper or news site through the use of its journalistic resources, including the use of stories, editorials, cartoons, photographs, graphics, videos, databases, multimedia or interactive presentations or other visual material, a gold medal. Awarded to The Washington Post for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security. and Awarded to The Guardian US for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, helping through aggressive reporting to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.

Finalists also nominated as a finalist in this category was Newsday, Long Island, N.Y., for its use of in-depth reporting and digital tools to expose shootings, beatings and other concealed misconduct by some Long Island police officers, leading to the formation of a grand jury and an official review of police accountability.

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INTERNATIONAL

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Senate moves closer on spending bill, but acrimony still holds up process

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2 U.S. troops, Afghan Supreme Court official among 15 killed by Taliban

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The International Energy Agency’s new report makes crystal clear why oil prices are tumbling.

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MEXICO NEWS

Image Credit

 

A federal judge dismissed criminal charges on Monday against two women who witnessed the June 30 army killing of suspected drug gang members in southern Mexico.
A selection of our best images of 2014 from Latin America and the Caribbean starts with the case of 43 missing - and apparently slain - students in Mexico that ignited indignation across the country and around the world. Officials acknowledged they disappeared at the hands of a corrupt local government and federal authorities took 10 days to intervene.
Mexico is ready to intervene in currency markets to fight the peso's fall against the dollar amid concerns over dropping oil prices and a possible increase in U.S. interest rates.

Mexicans’ search for students’ bodies reveals a history of hidden deaths


Guillermina Sotelo Castañeda holds a photo of her son. (J. Levinson for Post)

Joshua Partlow

Forty-three students went missing in September, but they were hardly the first. Their abduction by police has let loose a flood of new accusations.

In Mexico's forest of the disappeared

As violence in Mexico's drug-ravaged southern region continue, local vigilante form their own law enforcement to become judge and jury.
More than two months after they disappeared, concrete evidence is beginning to emerge on the fate of 43 college students whose case has caused a political crisis in Mexico. At least one of them has been identified among charred remains found several weeks ago near a garbage dump, family and government officials say.
Mexico's congress has passed legislation to ban the use of animals in circuses across the country.

The government announced on Thursday the start of bidding for oil exploration rights in 14 areas of the Gulf of Mexico being opened to domestic and international companies as Mexico ends a seven-decade state monopoly on the petroleum business.

Adán Cortés Salas jumped onstage when the Pakistani teenager was collecting her Nobel peace prize.

Mexico's president on Thursday announced measures to boost the economy in Guerrero, making his first visit to the tumultuous state since 43 students disappeared there more than two months ago and set off the biggest crisis of his administration.

President Barack Obama said Tuesday that the U.S. has offered to help Mexico figure out what happened to 43 college students who have been missing since September, but he stopped short of saying that aid to the U.S. ally and neighbor should be reconsidered on the basis of the country's human rights record.

Mexican president visits state of missing students

Mexico's president on Thursday announced measures to boost the economy in Guerrero, making his first visit to the tumultuous state since 43 students disappeared there more than two months ago and set off the biggest crisis of his administration.

IMF head warns of bumpy road for Latin America

Latin America faces a rocky road ahead despite social and economic achievements in recent years, the head of the International Monetary Fund said Friday.

Renowned Mexican author, playwright and journalist Vicente Lenero has died. He was 81.
Federal police and soldiers will take over policing duties in the resort of Acapulco to ensure the safety of tourists amid a wave of violence and protests that has scared away visitors, Mexican authorities said Wednesday.
Protesters marched in several cities in Mexico on Monday to mark the second anniversary of President Enrique Pena Nieto's administration and demand the government find 43 students who disappeared at the hands of police.

AIDS Day concert, teachers march for missing students in Mexico, ice storm in Hungary and more.
Mexico's most corruption-plagued municipal police forces would be replaced by state police within two years under a bill President Enrique Pena Nieto has submitted to Congress.
Olegario Vazquez Rana of Mexico has been re-elected as the international shooting federation president for a ninth four-year term.
The parents of an 11-year-old Mexican boy who recently had portions of a massive tumor removed will be allowed to stay in the U.S. while he receives treatment, New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez's office said Tuesday.

By Associated Press November 29, 2014

TIXTLA, Mexico — The men are holed up with their buses on the college’s soccer field, sleeping in the compartments that once held passenger luggage and hanging the clothes they’ve hand-washed from the windshields.

While attention has focused on the kidnapping and disappearance of 43 students from the Raul Isidro Burgos teachers college in Tixtla, few have paid much attention to the three dozen or more bus drivers who say they are being forced by activists from the school to live as captives and act as chauffeurs for the very people who commandeered their vehicles.

The drivers, some of whom have been at the southern Mexico school more than a month, say they cannot abandon the buses because their companies hold them financially responsible for the vehicles, some of which are worth well over a hundred thousand dollars. And with authorities unwilling to inflame tensions over the disappearance and presumed massacre of students from the school, no one is coming to their rescue.

“They say we aren’t kidnapped because we can get out and walk around, or swim in the (campus) pool,” said one driver who, like the others holed up at the school, refused to give his name for fear of angering the students. “But a prison inmate can also go out to the exercise yard or the gym, and that doesn’t mean they’re free.”

More, HERE.

Mexico's president announced a nationwide anti-crime plan Thursday that would allow Congress to dissolve local governments infiltrated by drug gangs and give state authorities control over often-corrupt municipal police.
Thousands of fans in Mexico City paid homage Sunday to Roberto Gomez Bolanos, the late Mexican comedian who played the boy television character "El Chavo del Ocho" that defined a generation for millions of Latin American children.

Garcia Marquez family explains archive decision

The family of Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez says the late Colombian novelist's archive was offered only to the University of Texas, which will be the materials' repository.

Juan Carlos Llorca, a veteran Associated Press journalist who covered immigration and the drug war along the U.S.-Mexico border, and whose reporting on illegal international adoptions helped prompt national reforms in Guatemala, has died at age 40.

A panic alert flashed across Alberto Herrera's computer screen. Men claiming to be with the notorious Gulf Cartel had stopped a convoy transporting chemicals through a lawless region of northeastern Mexico. They seized two drivers from an escort truck and demanded the valuable cargo in exchange for their release.
The earpiece is usually the giveaway. Or, maybe it's the dark suits, the big SUVs with tinted windows or the menacing Dodge Avengers in black, always black.
Mexico's left faces huge problems following the resignation of former presidential candidate Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, a pillar of progressive politics and son of the revered president who nationalized the oil industry.
Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, a pillar of leftist politics in Mexico and son of the revered president who nationalized the oil industry, resigned Tuesday from the political party he founded, citing disagreements with its leadership.

Bill Clinton's incorrect comparison between U.S. and Mexican engineering graduates

The former president says the U.S. and Mexico have about the same number of engineering graduates. That's wrong.
An 11-year-old Mexican boy with a massive tumor who drew international attention when U.S. officials helped him get treatment in New Mexico is still recovering after an 11-hour surgery to remove pieces of the growth.

Mexico summons Uruguay's ambassador over comment

Mexico summoned Uruguay's ambassador on Sunday after the South American country's president described Mexico as a kind of "failed state" in a magazine interview.

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from Latin America

Tens of thousands of demonstrators marched in Mexico City to demand that authorities find 43 missing college students. The march was held on a day traditionally reserved for the celebration of Mexico's 1910-1917 Revolution. Protests turned violent when demonstrators clashed with riot police near the capital's international airport and later when they tried to storm the national palace. Demonstrators were arrested and photojournalists attacked.

The Mexican navy confirmed on Saturday that a U.S. marshal was wounded in Mexico while working with naval personnel in the northwestern state of Sinaloa during the summer.

Angry Mexicans protest over 43 missing students

A largely peaceful march by tens of thousands demanding the return of 43 missing students ended in violence, as a small group of masked protesters battled police in Mexico City's main square.

Demonstrators clashed with riot police in Mexico City's Zocalo square after thousands marched Thursday demanding that authorities find 43 missing college students.

Winners and losers under Obama's immigration plan

President Barack Obama unveiled one of the most sweeping changes to the U.S. immigration system in decades, shielding millions from deportation.
What the nation's governors and governors-elect of states that border Mexico said following Obama's speech.

Mexico has its own immigration problem: American retirees

Americans are said to overstay their welcome in Mexico while the government turns a blind eye.
Brad Pitt and George Clooney are intercepted by Mexico's border patrol. Carlos Slim, the world's richest man, is ready to audition for a soap opera.
The U.S. Embassy in Mexico says the U.S. government will provide $68 million over five years to assist Mexico's effort to reform its court and justice system.
Demonstrators take to the streets to demand justice for 43 students who are missing and presumed dead.
The Colima volcano in western Mexico has erupted, sending a column of ash about 3 miles (5 kilometers) into the air.

Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies, Spring 2014

Why America Is to Blame for Mexico's Carnage and Corruption

BY John M. Ackerman, November 26, 2014

The crisis over 43 massacred students shows how dysfunctional and corrupt Peña Nieto's government is. And yet Obama keeps patting him on the back.

Le Monde

Soupçons sur un autre enlèvement massif au Mexique 6

France 24 affirme qu'une trentaine de lycéens ont été enlevés en juillet à Cocula, village voisin d'Iguala, et sont toujours portés disparus.

Etudiants disparus au Mexique : un leader historique de la gauche démissionne de son parti

Après la disparition de 43 étudiants, les dirigeants politiques du Mexique affrontent une crise historique.

Edito du Monde

Le retour des heures sombres au Mexique

Deux ans après son entrée en fonctions, le président mexicain, Enrique Peña Nieto, est confronté à la plus grave crise de son mandat.

Récit

Polémique sur la somptueuse villa de l’épouse du président mexicain

Les soupçons de conflit d’intérêts se multiplient, et ce alors que le président Peña Nieto affronte la plus grave crise de son mandat après la disparition de 43 étudiants.

Compte rendu

Révolte contre l’« Etat-mafia » au Mexique

Après la disparition de 43 étudiants, le président Peña Nieto affronte la plus grave crise de son mandat.

Mexique : heurts après un défilé pour les étudiants disparus Vidéo

Des heurts se sont produits entre des groupes de manifestants et la police anti-émeute face au Palais national, au centre de Mexico, jeudi.

Des heurts dans le centre de Mexico autour de la disparition des 43 étudiants

Policiers et manifestants se sont opposés devant le Palais national au centre de la capitale, jeudi soir.

Pourquoi le Mexique se révolte-t-il après l'enlèvement de 43 étudiants ? Vidéo

Les manifestations violentes se succèdent au Mexique depuis l'enlèvement de 43 étudiants, le 26 septembre. Comment cette crise est-elle devenue le symbole d'une colère profonde de la population?

Mexique : marche nationale des familles des disparus Vidéo

Les familles veulent dire « non » à la violence.

Plus de Mexique, ICI

© Le Monde.fr

The Wall Street Journal

New Ties by Mexico Builder Roil Nation

Opposition parties called for a probe into a loan and home purchase the Mexican finance minister secured from the same politically connected businessman who built and held the title to a mansion for Mexico’s first lady.

- See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.pt7agj56.dpuf

Mexico Digs Into Ties Between Leader, Builder

Little-Known Government Deals Won by a Contractor Seen Close to President Peña Nieto Emerge, as Opposition Calls for Probes

U.S. Marshals Service Personnel Dressed as Mexican Marines Pursue Cartel Bosses

Members of U.S. Marshals Service Join Military Operations in Mexico Against Drug Gangs

More, HERE.

Copyright ©2014 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

NPR

November 19, 2014

Eyder Peralta

Amid rumblings about conflict of interest and corruption, Mexico's first lady says she will sell a multimillion-dollar home in one of the most glamorous areas of Mexico City.

In a YouTube video released late Tuesday, Angélica Rivera defiantly proclaims that she has "nothing to hide."

"I have worked all my life, and because of that I am an independent woman capable of building a patrimony with honesty," she said.

Rivera and her husband, President Enrique Peña Nieto, have been under heavy scrutiny lately: first, because of the way the government has handled the case of 43 students who went missing after they were detained by police, and then after Aristegui Noticias revealed that an opulent modern structure dubbed "The White House" and valued at $7 million was owned by a construction company awarded millions in government contracts.

As Aristegui explained, the house, which Rivera showed off in a glitzy spread in the royal-centric magazine ¡Hola!, was just another symbol of the "close relationship between Peña Nieto and Grupo Higa."

According to the investigation, Grupo Higa is owned by Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantú, who in the past rented out airplanes for the Peña Nieto's 2012 presidential campaign. The company, Aristegui reports, received millions of dollars in contracts in the state of Mexico when Peña Nieto was governor.

Once Peña Nieto was in the presidential palace, a subsidiary of Hinojosa's company was awarded part of a huge contract to build a high-speed train from Mexico City to Querétaro.

Just days before the report was published, Peña Nieto canceled the $3.7 billion contract.

More, HERE.

© 2014 NPR

Al Jazeera America

VIDEO: Mexico's Nieto faces growing calls to resign

02 Dec 2014

President's second anniversary in office marred by protests as he and the government are accused of corruption.

With help from the Obama administration, Peña Nieto is brutally reshaping Mexican society

Through the story of one immigrant family, we explore the evolution of racism and migration in the US.

President Pena Nieto proposes changes to police force following uproar over presumed massacre of 43 students.

Ferguson: Lawmakers urge calm, offer few policy prescriptions

Analysis: Think riots have never caused change in America? Think again

Brown's parents vow to 'keep fighting' for justice

Protesters upset by Ferguson decision storm St. Louis City Hall

Confronting race and inequality in the US

Week before verdict, 12 killed by US law enforcement

Please click on HERE to get updated Al Jazeera, Mexico news

Drug trafficking organizations are rapidly splintering, but there€’s no end in sight to the violence

Topics:

Mexico

Drugs

Drug Cartels
The village warriors of Guerrero

Cocaine, heroin and avocados

Thousands march in Mexico over students

Tens of thousands of people angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students are marching in Mexico City as part of another day of nationwide protests.

Protesters on Thursday waved blackened flags of Mexico and many chanted for the resignation of President Enrique Pena Nieto. "He will fall, he will fall, Pena Nieto will fall," they chanted.

Some protesters clashed with riot police near the city's international airport at the start of the day's demonstrations, burning tyres, throwing firebombs and launching firecrackers at police.

Thursday’s protest was the latest protest over the government's handling of a crime that has infuriated Mexicans fed up with corruption, impunity and a drug war that has left more than 100,000 people dead or missing since 2006.

The case has turned into the biggest challenge of Pena Nieto's nearly two-year-old presidency, on top of another scandal over a mansion his wife bought from a government contractor.

'Mexico is hurting'

The crisis erupted after the mayor of the city of Iguala allegedly ordered police to confront students on September 26, sparking a night of violence that left six people dead and 43 missing, authorities say.

Protesters angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students take to the streets for another day of demonstrations.

More, HERE.

Police officer fires on Mexico City students, inflaming tensions

Students had been planning for a Nov. 20 national strike in solidarity with 43 missing students from Guerrero

INSIDE STORY

VIDEO: Missing Mexico students: Who is responsible.

Protesters demand justice for missing 43 trainee teachers who are feared murdered in Mexico. To watch video click on HERE.

Mexico president pushes trade ties in China while protests rage at home

Peña Nieto's Beijing trip amid massive political crisis at home shows heavy bet on China ties as economic boost

Mexico missing student protesters burn state buildings

Protest movement has hit Guerrero'€™s tourism industry with vacationers canceling trips during busiest time of year.

Photos: In Acapulco, an angry demonstration over missing students

Students, peasants and others attempt to block the airport and clash with police.

Mexico leader travels to Asia amid rising unrest over missing students

Peña Nieto faces increased calls to resign as another presidential scandal emerged over the weekend

Mexico protesters set fire to National Palace over missing students

Gang members have confessed to killing the 43 missing students and dumping their charred remains in a landfill.

Gang members confess to mass killing of Mexico students

Charred human remains found in a dumpster are likely the students who disappeared on Sept. 26, Mexican authorities say.

Mexican army accepts criticism of human rights commission in killings

The defense department says, however, it doesn't agree with all findings of human rights commission on the June slayings.

Why have the most recent kidnappings in Mexico sparked such outrage?

The disappearance of 43 students in Mexico has triggered nationwide demonstrations for government accountability.

Thousands protest missing Mexico students despite mayor arrest

Public anger over student disappearances brings Mexico City to a standstill; full-blown crisis for President Peña Nieto.

Photos: Protests over 43 Guerrero students target government buildings

A city congress and buildings tied to the ruling party are trashed and burned.

The food producer has developed more than 480 varieties of wheat, upping production by an estimated 200 million tonnes.
Mexican official: CIA 'manages' drug trade

Spokesman for Chihuahua state says US agencies don't want to end drug trade, a claim denied by other Mexican officials

24 Jul 2012, by Chris Arsenault

Juarez, Mexico - The US Central Intelligence Agency and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers", a spokesman for the Chihuahua state government in northern Mexico has told Al Jazeera, instead "they try to manage the drug trade".

Allegations about official complicity in the drug business are nothing new when they come from activists, professors, campaigners or even former officials. However, an official spokesman for the authorities in one of Mexico's most violent states - one which directly borders Texas - going on the record with such accusations is unique.

"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva, the Chihuahua spokesman, told Al Jazeera last month at his office in Juarez. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."

Accusations are 'baloney'

Villanueva is not a high ranking official and his views do not represent Mexico's foreign policy establishment. Other more senior officials in Chihuahua State, including the mayor of Juarez, dismissed the claims as "baloney".

"I think the CIA and DEA [US Drug Enforcement Agency] are on the same side as us in fighting drug gangs," Hector Murguia, the mayor of Juarez, told Al Jazeera during an interview inside his SUV. "We have excellent collaboration with the US."

Under the Merida Initiative, the US Congress has approved more than $1.4bn in drug war aid for Mexico, providing attack helicopters, weapons and training for police and judges.

More than 55,000 people have died in drug related violence in Mexico since December 2006. Privately, residents and officials across Mexico's political spectrum often blame the lethal cocktail of US drug consumption and the flow of high-powered weapons smuggled south of the border for causing much of the carnage.

"The war on drugs is an illusion," Hugo Almada Mireles, professor at the Autonomous University of Juarez and author of several books, told Al Jazeera. "It's a reason to intervene in Latin America."

"The CIA wants to control the population; they don't want to stop arms trafficking to Mexico, look at [Operation] Fast and Furious,” he said, referencing a botched US exercise where automatic weapons were sold to criminals in the hope that security forces could trace where the guns ended up.

The Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms lost track of 1,700 guns as part of the operation, including an AK-47 used in 2010 the murder of Brian Terry, a Customs and Border Protection Agent.

More, HERE.

© 2014 Al Jazeera America, LLC. All rights reserved.

InSight Crime

InSight Crime is a foundation dedicated to the study of the principal threat to national and citizen security in Latin America and the Caribbean: organized crime. We seek to deepen and inform the debate about organized crime in the Americas by providing the general public with regular reporting, analysis and investigation on the subject and on state efforts to combat it. More about Insight Crime HERE.

Iguala Massacre: Mexico's PR Message Goes Up in Flames

The stunning, dramatic blow-by-blow account of what most likely happened to the 43 missing students in Guerrero is an indication of just how desperately Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto and his team are trying to perform damage control on a terrifying story -- one that has not only unsettled his government, but has pushed them to admit that things are not as their public relations machine would have you believe.

In the hour-long November 7 press conference (see video below), Attorney General Jose Murillo Karam announced that the recent capture of alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos led to confessions that the students were taken by police while en route to the town of Iguala. The police handed the students over to the Guerreros Unidos, who then killed them and burned their remains.

Specifically, video testimonies from three recently captured “masterminds” of the attacks revealed that the students were carted like cattle to a landfill in Cocula. According to one suspect, approximately 15 students asphyxiated on the way to the dump site. The remaining students were interrogated by members of the Guerreros Unidos before being shot and killed. The bodies were then thrown into the landfill, arranged in a circle, covered in sticks, gasoline, and diesel, and burned. The fire reportedly lasted for 14 hours, from midnight on September 27, until mid-afternoon.

According to the testimonies, a leader of the criminal group known as “El Terco” ordered the burned human remains to be collected and placed into eight black plastic bags. Members of the Guerreros Unidos then took the bags to the San Juan River in Cocula, where they dumped the contents into the water, while two bags were thrown directly into the river.

Following the confessions, search teams found black bags, one of which was still closed. Mexican and Argentine forensic teams reportedly confirmed the bag contained human remains. However, due to the degree to which the bodies were burned, forensic experts have not yet determined when the remains will be able to be identified.

More, HERE.

Business Insider

Tens Of Thousands Of Mexicans Protest In The Streets Over 43 Missing Students

Carola Sole, AFP

Oct. 9, 2014

Mexico City (AFP) - Tens of thousands of people held protests in Mexico, joining tearful families of 43 missing students demanding their return amid fears a police-backed gang executed them.

Crowds on Wednesday gathered from Mexico City to the violence-wracked state of Guerrero, where the students disappeared, and as far south as Chiapas.

Parents of the victims traveled from Guerrero to head a march of thousands of people in Mexico City, tearfully holding up pictures of their sons, and signs reading "we want them back alive."

More, HERE.

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Mexican Official Accuses CIA Of 'Managing' Not 'Fighting' The Drug Trade

Jul. 24, 2012, by

A Mexican state government spokesman told Al Jazeera that the CIA and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers" as much as "try to manage the drug trade," Chris Arsenault reports.

"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Chihuahua spokesman Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva told Al Jazeera. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."

More, HERE.

Copyright © 2014 Business Insider Inc. All rights reserved.

Infowars.com

Former CIA Officer Says ISIS and Mexican Drug Cartels Communicate

U.S. Gov. and CIA connected to drugs and terror

By Kurt Nimmo | Infowars.com | August 21, 2014

A former CIA officer, now a security consultant who regularly appears on Fox News, told the Laura Ingraham Show Thursday ISIS and Mexican drug cartels communicate with each other.

“We’ve had good intel over the years about al-Qaeda, about their efforts to coordinate with, as an example, Mexican cartels… in an effort to try to exploit our southern border,” Mike Baker told Ingraham.

The one-time CIA employee said there is “a lot of communication” between ISIS and drug cartels and “the cartels are a business… if there’s a revenue stream they can exploit, then they will, and the extremists understand that.”

It is not clear if this intel was passed on to Baker by his former colleagues.

In 2012 a spokesman for the Chihuahua state in Mexico, Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva told Aljazerra the CIA and other intelligence agencies manage the drug trade in Mexico.

More, HERE.

Contact:512-291-5750512-291-5750 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Infowars, P.O. Box 19549, Austin, TX 78760

The Daily Beast

Anatomy of a Mexican Student Massacre

10.08.14, by Jason McGahan

For almost a century a teacher’s college in rural Mexico has been training educators and activists. Last month, dozens were abducted and slaughtered—by the police.

MEXICO CITY — Twelve days ago, police and unidentified gunmen believed to be members of a drug cartel ambushed a caravan of college student activists in the state of Guerrero, about half way from Mexico City to Acapulco.

Near the central plaza in the town of Iguala, a total of six persons were shot to death. Three were student activists from the Raúl Isidro Burgos Rural Teachers College of Ayotzinapa. Three additional shooting victims were a semiprofessional soccer player riding in one of the three buses, a taxi driver, and his female passenger. But most likely they were unintended victims caught in the line of fire. There’s no question the students were the target.

One who survived the first fusillade, a 19-year-old named Julio César Mondragón, panicked and, over the objections of classmates who said they should stay together, ran away on his own. He was later found dead and horribly disfigured; a photo of his corpse has gone viral in Mexico: it shows the face stripped away to the bare skull underneath.

Survivors of the incident report that the police and thugs attacked the students three times. They sprayed one of the buses with machine gun fire. One eyewitness reported seeing the police force students out of another bus at gunpoint. In addition to the three students killed, 17 student activists were wounded. But they may have been the lucky ones. As many as 44 others were abducted. Some reports say they were taken away in police vehicles. None of them have been seen since September 26.

The precise motives for the killings are difficult to determine, but the students come from a school that has been training rural teachers—and activists—for the better part of a century. Their commitment to helping small farmers and farm workers in the rugged, semi-feudal countryside often has put them at odds with the local powers that be. And when you add to that the cozy relationship that exists today between some of those powers and narcotics traffickers, the situation is explosive.

More, HERE.

© 2014 The Daily Beast Company LLC

The New American

U.S. Government and Top Mexican Drug Cartel Exposed as Partners

14 January 2014, by 

For over a decade, under multiple administrations, the U.S. government had a secret agreement with the ruthless Mexican Sinaloa drug cartel that allowed it to operate with impunity, an in-depth investigation by a leading Mexican newspaper confirmed this week. In exchange for information and assistance in quashing competing criminal syndicates, the Bush and Obama administrations let the Sinaloa cartel import tons of drugs into the United States while wiping out Sinaloa competitors and ensuring that its leaders would not be prosecuted for their long list of major crimes. Other revelations also point strongly to massive but clandestine U.S. government involvement in drug trafficking.

Relying on over 100 interviews with current and former government functionaries on both sides of the border, as well as official documents from the U.S. and Mexican governments, Mexico’s El Universal concluded that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and the U.S. Justice Department had secretly worked with Mexican drug lords. The controversial conspiring led to increased violence across Mexico, where many tens of thousands have been murdered in recent years, the newspaper found after its year-long probe. The U.S. agents and their shady deals with Mexican drug lords even sparked what the paper called a “secret war” inside Mexico.

The newspaper’s investigation also confirmed long-held suspicions that U.S. authorities were signing secret agreements with Mexican drug cartels — especially Sinaloa, which CIA operatives have said was a favorite for use in achieving geo-political objectives. Supposedly without the knowledge or approval of officials in Mexico, ICE and DEA, with a green light from Washington, D.C., made deals with criminal bosses allowing them to avoid prosecution for a vast crime spree that has included mass murder, corruption, bribery, drug trafficking, extortion, and more. In exchange, cartel leaders simply had to help U.S. officials eliminate their competitors — certainly a win-win scenario for crime bosses who prefer to operate without competition or fear of prosecution.

More, HERE.

Alex Newman, a foreign correspondent for The New American, is normally based in Europe after growing up in Latin America, including seven years in Mexico. He can be reached at   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Related articles:

CIA “Manages” Drug Trade, Mexican Official Says

Reports: CIA Working with Mexican Drug Cartels

Trafficker: U.S. Feds Aided Mexican Drug Cartel

Mexican Drug Trafficker Says He Worked With Feds

Stratfor Sources: U.S. Troops in Mexico as Feds Aid Cartels

Congress Probes DEA Drug Money Laundering Scheme

Feds Let Mexican Cartel Hit Men Kill in U.S., Senior Lawman Told Stratfor

Fast and Furious: FBI Now Linked to Murder of U.S. Border Agent

U.S. Judge: Obama Homeland Security Aiding Criminal Conspiracies

Impeachment Support Soars as Voters Say Feds “Out of Control”

Copyright © 2014 The New American

GlobalPost – International News

Mexico accepts student demands in bid to avert spread of protests

Agencia EFE; October 4, 2014

Mexico City, Oct 4 (EFE).- Mexico's government has accepted all the demands of student protesters at the National Polytechnic Institute, or IPN, a public university in this capital, in a bid to prevent the movement from spreading to other higher education institutions.

On Sept. 22, students at the IPN's Superior School of Engineering and Architecture halted activities to protest new internal regulations that they said lowered the institution's academic and professional level.

More, HERE.

Copyright EFE, 2014.

Home

US Military’s Training of Mexican Security Forces Continues As Human-Rights Abuses Mount In Mexico

Posted by Bill Conroy - December 3, 2014

DoD Officials Claim Training is Part of the Solution, Not the Problem

The U.S. government has spent more than $62 million since fiscal year 2010 providing highly specialized training to Mexican security forces, including some $16.3 million in fiscal 2013, as part of an effort to help Mexico better prosecute its war on drugs, records made public under the U.S. Foreign Assistance Act show.

Local Opposition to Washington’s Legal Marijuana Businesses Is a Taxing Issue For the Fledgling Industry

Posted by Bill Conroy - November 14, 2014

Effort to Overcome City Moratoriums on Cannabis Shops Could Spark an Unlikely Alliance

The great experiment in the state of Washington to legalize the sale of marijuana through a regulated and taxed market has hit a hitch at the local level that threatens to slow progress to a snail’s pace, even as more and more marijuana businesses obtain the state licensing needed to open their doors.

Through early November, Washington’s cannabis market, state records show, included some 63 retailers, 239 producers and 197 processors — all issued the required state-level licenses to begin doing business in the state. But the battle ahead for many of them — and others in the pipeline — to actually open their doors for business is far from over.

More, HERE.

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Labor Unions Are Supporting Washington State Legal Marijuana Dispensaries that Create "More Workers to Organize"

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 22, 2014

The United Food and Commercial Workers and other Unions Seek to Strengthen Protections for Cannabis Workers

What’s going on in the state of Washington and beyond with the movement to legalize marijuana is, only in part, about business, taxes and government oversight — all to be amplified by the billions of dollars annually this new industry promises to throw off.

More, HERE.

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Community Police in Guerrero’s Costa Chica Region to Celebrate 19 Years of a Better Way to Combat Crime and Corruption

The Same Southern Mexican State Where 43 Students Were Disappeared Is also Home to a Grassroots Movement that Shows How People Can Police Themselves When the State Becomes Criminal.

By Greg Berger and Oscar Olivera

Special for The Narco News Bulletin

November 7, 2014

Publisher’s Note: In Mexico and throughout the world the state of Guerrero has become a vivid example of the horrors of the “war on drugs” and the pervasive corruption and violence it invites from all levels of government. On September 26, Mayor Jose Luis Abarca of the city of Iguala ordered police to detain a group of students from the local Ayotzinapa teachers’ college. The mayor’s ties to organized crime have been widely documented. It is believed that the mayor thought the students were planning to stage a protest at a public event held by his wife. Police then killed six students, and 43 more were disappeared. The police reportedly turned the 43 youths over to a local criminal gang. Multiple mass graves have been dug up in the area, each at first rumored to contain the bodies of the students, then have been revealed to be the tombs of previous nameless casualties of the US-imposed drug war.

The whereabouts of the missing students are still unknown.

More, HERE.

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Millions Missing From DEA Money-Laundering Operation

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 6, 2014

But No One With the Power to Investigate Seems to Care

At least $20 million went missing from money seizures by law enforcers, critical evidence was destroyed by a federal agency, a key informant was outed by a US prosecutor — contributing to her being kidnapped and nearly killed — and at the end of the day not a single narco-trafficker was prosecuted in this four-year-long DEA undercover operation gone awry.

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Charles Bowden has died, but his voice is louder than ever

Posted by Bill Conroy - September 2, 2014

As one of the original authentic journalists, he trailblazed a path for others to follow

When I heard that he had passed, my eyes welled with tears. I’m of stoic Irish stock, so I don’t shed tears easily, but the news of Charles Bowden’s death (1945-2014) was not an easy thing to bear. He had been a mentor and a friend to me for a decade, and his leaving hurts.

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Official US Cover-Up Still Obscures Motive for Juarez Consulate Murders

Posted by Bill Conroy - May 7, 2014
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U.S. Military: More Counter-Narcotics Funding Will Help Stem Exodus of Children from Central America

By Bill Conroy - July 29, 2014

 

Critics Argue Drug-War Money is Part of the Problem, Not the Solution.

 

Some 58,000 migrant children, mostly Central Americans, have made the treacherous journey to the U.S. southern border alone over the past 10 months, but actions being considered by U.S. officials to combat the problem with more military and drug-war aid to their countries, critics warn, may worsen the violence that provokes this unprecedented exodus.

 

The number of unaccompanied children that have arrived at the U.S. border so far this fiscal year is up 106 percent from the same period a year earlier — with the total expected to reach 90,000 before Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year.


To put that latter number in perspective, it is nearly five times larger than the number of Border Patrol agents now stationed along the entire southern border.

More, HERE.
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MORE NARCO NEWS, HERE

25 Deadliest Mass Shootings in U.S. History Fast Facts

By CNN Library; September 2, 2014

(CNN) -- Here is a list of the 25 deadliest single day mass shootings in U.S. history from 1949 to the present. If the shooter was killed or committed suicide during the incident that death is not included in the total.

Timeline:

32 killed - April 16, 2007 - Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. A gunman, 23-year-old student Seung-Hui Cho, goes on a shooting spree killing 32 people in two locations and wounds an undetermined number of others on campus. The shooter, Seung-Hui Cho then committed suicide.

27 killed - December 14, 2012 - Sandy Hook Elementary School - Newtown, Connecticut. Adam Lanza, 20, guns down 20 children, ages 6 and 7, and six adults, school staff and faculty, before turning the gun on himself. Investigating police later find Nancy Lanza, Adam's mother, dead from a gunshot wound. The final count is 28 dead, including the shooter.

23 killed - October 16, 1991 - In Killeen, Texas, 35-year-old George Hennard crashes his pickup truck through the wall of a Lubys Cafeteria. After exiting the truck, Hennard shoots and kills 23 people. He then commits suicide.

21 killed - July 18, 1984 - In San Ysidro, California, 41-year-old James Huberty, armed with a long-barreled Uzi, a pump-action shotgun and a handgun shoots and kills 21 adults and children at a local McDonalds. A police sharpshooter kills Huberty one hour after the rampage begins.

18 killed - August 1, 1966 - In Austin, Texas, Charles Joseph Whitman, a former U.S. Marine, kills 16 and wounds at least 30 while shooting from a University of Texas tower. Police officers Ramiro Martinez and Houston McCoy shot and killed Whitman in the tower. Whitman had also killed his mother and wife earlier in the day.

14 killed - August 20, 1986 - Edmond, Oklahoma part-time mail carrier, Patrick Henry Sherrill, armed with three handguns kills 14 postal workers in ten minutes and then takes his own life with a bullet to the head.

13 killed - November 5, 2009 - Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan kills 13 people and injures 32 at Fort Hood, Texas, during a shooting rampage. He is convicted and sentenced to death.

13 killed - April 3, 2009 - In Binghamton, New York, Jiverly Wong kills 13 people and injures four during a shooting at an immigrant community center. He then kills himself.

13 killed - April 20, 1999 - Columbine High School - Littleton, Colorado. 18-year-old Eric Harris and

17-year-old Dylan Klebold kill 12 fellow students and one teacher before committing suicide in the school library.

13 killed - September 25, 1982 - In Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 40-year-old George Banks, a prison guard, kills 13 people including five of his own children. In September 2011, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturns his death sentence stating that Banks is mentally incompetent.

13 killed - September 5, 1949 - In Camden, New Jersey, 28-year-old Howard Unruh, a veteran of World War II, shoots and kills 13 people as he walks down Camden's 32nd Street. His weapon of choice is a German-crafted Luger pistol. He is found insane and is committed to a state mental institution. He dies at the age of 88.

12 killed - September 16, 2013 - Shots are fired inside the Washington Navy Yard killing 12. The shooter, identified as Aaron Alexis, 34, is also killed.

12 killed - July 20, 2012 - Twelve people are killed and 58 are wounded in a shooting at an Aurora, Colorado, movie theater screening of the new Batman film. James E. Holmes, 24, is taken into custody outside of the movie theater. The gunman is dressed head-to-toe in protective tactical gear, set off two devices of some kind before spraying the theater with bullets from an AR-15 rifle, a 12-gauge shotgun and at least one of two .40-caliber handguns police recovered at the scene.

12 killed - July 29, 1999 - In Atlanta, 44-year-old Mark Barton kills his wife and two children at his home. He then opens fire in two different brokerage houses killing nine people and wounding 12. He later kills himself.

10 killed - March 10, 2009 - In Alabama, Michael McLendon of Kinston, kills 10 and himself. The dead include his mother, grandparents, aunt and uncle.

9 killed - March 21, 2005 - Red Lake High School, Red Lake, Minnesota. 16-year-old Jeff Weise kills his grandfather and another adult, five students, a teacher and a security officer. He then kills himself.

9 killed - June 18, 1990 - In Jacksonville, Florida, 42-year-old James Pough, angry about his car being repossessed, opens fire at at a General Motors Acceptance Corp. office, killing nine people. Pough takes his own life.

8 killed - October 12, 2011 - Eight people are killed during a shooting at the Salon Meritage in Seal Beach, California. The suspect, Scott Evans Dekraai, 41, of Huntington Beach, is arrested without incident as he is trying to leave the scene. The eight dead include Dekraai's ex-wife, Michelle Fournier, 48. He was armed with three guns -- a 9 mm Springfield, a Smith & Wesson .44 Magnum, and a Heckler & Koch .45 -- and was wearing body armor during the shooting rampage.

8 killed - August 3, 2010 - Manchester, Connecticut - Omar Thornton kills eight co-workers at Hartford Distributors before turning the gun on himself. Thornton had been asked to resign for stealing and selling alcoholic beverages.

8 killed - January 19, 2010 - Christopher Speight, 39, kills eight people at a house in Appomattox, Virginia. He surrenders to police at the scene the next morning, and is charged with one count of murder with additional charges pending.

8 killed - March 29, 2009 - In Carthage, North Carolina, 45-year-old Robert Stewart kills a nurse and seven elderly patients at a nursing home. In May, the Moore County district attorney announces she will seek the death penalty. On September 3, 2011, a jury finds Stewart guilty of second-degree murder. Stewart is sentenced to 141 to 179 years in prison.

8 killed - December 5, 2007 - In Omaha, Nebraska, 19-year-old Robert Hawkins goes to an area mall and kills eight shoppers before killing himself.

8 killed - July 1, 1993 - In San Francisco, 55-year-old Gian Luigi Ferri kills eight people in a law office and then kills himself.

8 killed - September 14, 1989 - In Louisville, Kentucky, 47-year-old Joseph Wesbecker armed with a AK-47 semiautomatic assault rifle, two MAC-11 semiautomatic pistols, a .38 caliber handgun, a 9-millimeter semiautomatic pistol and a bayonet kills eight co-workers at Standard Gravure Corporation and then kills himself. He had been placed on disability leave from his job due to mental problems.

8 killed - August 20, 1982 - In Miami, 51-year-old history teacher Carl Robert Brown, angry about a repair bill and armed with a shotgun, kills eight people at a machine shop. He flees by bicycle, but is shot in the back by a witness who pursued him. He was on leave from school for psychological treatment.

List of rampage killers (school massacres), by Wikipedia

List of school shootings in the United States, by Wikipedia

Starting with Pontiac's Rebellion school massacre on July 26, 1764 to August 6, 2014in River Woods Elementary when an 11-year-old student at RWES in Des Moines, Iowa, brought a BB gun to the school accompanied by two former students aged 11 & 16. The student admitted to having the weapon and making threats against 4 students. Police recovered the gun and arrested the alleged students

More, HERE.

America's Wars: U.S. Casualties and Veterans

The table below has information about the total number of service members, battle deaths, and nonmortal woundings in wars from 1775 to 2012; such as the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War I and II, Vietnam, and more

Information Please® Database, © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

67% of all homicides in the U.S. were conducted using a firearm: UN

According to the FBI, in 2012, there were 8,855 total firearm-related homicides in the US, with 6,371 of those attributed to handguns. 61% of all gun-related deaths in the U.S. are suicides. More, HERE by Wikipedia.

Crime in the United States

Crime in the United States has been present since colonization

Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

© 2014 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved

GLOBAL RESEARCH

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa was a Crime of the State

By Richard Roman and Edur Velasco Arregui

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iraqichildren

“From the beginning of humankind there has been brutality, conflict, intrigue, the destructive obsession with a narrow self-interest”, said Blair in acceptance. Freudian slip or what. He praised “the magnificent American and British Military” with Save The Children and other NGOs for their work in Africa.

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ISIL invasion

The US led war against the Islamic State is a big lie. Going after ”Islamic terrorists” is used to justify a military agenda. The Islamic State is a creation of US intelligence. Washington’s “Counter-terrorism Agenda” in Iraq & Syria consists in Supporting the Terrorists.

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Disappeared Students in Mexico: Global Struggle for Ayotzinapa Captures World’s Attention

By Telesur Global Research, November 22, 2014
More than 200 actions were carried out Thursday, coinciding with Mexico’s Day of Revolution.

A student’s skin was peeled over his head in a gruesome and clear display of a narco-state murder. The photo of the murder, which took place in the drug war-torn state of Guerrero some seven weeks ago, quickly went viral on the Internet. On the same day, five other people were killed and some 43 more students went “missing” in the small town of Ayotzinapa. In a press conference addressing the abuses more than one month after the disappearance of the students, who hailed from a rural-based and selective teachers college in Guerrero, an Attorney General presumed them “dead” without presenting any evidence to substantiate his conclusion. The nation’s leading prosecutor said he was “tired” by the end of the press conference, much to the chagrin of those who sympathized with the plight of the parents of the disappeared students.

Those happenings have served as the sparks that have ignited the nation’s ire to a feverish boiling point in one of the largest countries and economies of Latin America. Mexico has witnessed near daily and nation-wide actions of resistance. Since the disappearance of the “normalistas” (students training to be teachers) on September 26, the country has been brimming with mass marches, candle-light vigils, university-campus and labor-union-led strikes, occupations of official and university buildings, riot police-led arrests of demonstrators, property destruction of official buildings, sit-ins, panels ruminating over the ills of narco-state violence and international bridge closings.

While the 43 students, who are technically still missing due to the lack of any corpses being forensically tied to the students, were what clearly catalyzed the movement’s inception, much of the country has long been weary of the systematic problem of disappearances and the eery official impunity which has often surrounded them. Nothing less than some 24,000 disappearances, over the course of the last three years alone, account for official estimates. Other analysts estimate the actual total as being far higher than that.

The Mayor of Iguala and his wife, dubbed as the “imperial couple,” were arrested several weeks ago, as teleSUR previously reported. At the time of their arrest, speculation was that their detention may produce valuable clues that could help solve the case of the disappeared students. However, no significant advances have been made in the case since the detention of the couple. At the time of their arrest, the on-the-run couple were fugitives from the law and in hiding when authorities busted them at a rented home in Itzapalapa, Mexico City.

More, HERE.

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Angry Protests Sweep Mexico after Government Says Missing Students are Dead


Global Research, November 11, 2014

Angry protests swept Mexico over the weekend in the wake of a press conference Friday in which Jesús Murillo Karam, the country’s attorney general, declared that 43 missing teaching students from the Ayotzinapa Normal School in the state of Guerrero are all dead. Murrillo based this evaluation on confessions by gang members that they had killed the students, who were handed over to them by the police, and then burned their bodies.

Demonstrations in both Mexico City and the Guerrero capital of Chilpancingo saw clashes with police and attacks on government buildings. In the capital, a small group of demonstrators launched an attack on the historic National Palace in the city’s main square (El Zócalo). They first used metal security barriers to ram the building’s wooden door and then doused it with gasoline and set it on fire.

Some demonstrators questioned why it took police so long to respond to these acts, suggesting that they could have been the work of provocateurs.

More, HERE.

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More than 100,000 March in Mexico City over Disappeared Students

By Rafael Azul; Global Research, November 07, 2014

A mass protest march of more than 100,000 students, teachers, education workers and ordinary citizens took place in Mexico City on Wednesday, November 5, in solidarity with the 43 missing teaching students, normalistas, of the Ayotzinapa Normal School, who have been missing for over 40 days.

This was the third mass demonstration and by far the largest and angriest. Many of the participants directed their anger at President Enrique Peña Nieto, demanding that he resign. One protest sign denounced him “for corruption, betraying the nation, ineptitude,” calling him a “repressor and assassin.”

Others carried signs that said, “It was the State.” Leading the march were students from Mexico City’s National Autonomous Metropolitan University (UNAM), the Polytechnic Institute, rural teaching colleges, and Iberian-American University, who all had joined a massive nationwide 72-hour student strike.

At Mexico City’s Constitution Square (the Zócalo), many thousands greeted the protesters as they arrived after the two-and-a-half-hour march from the president’s mansion (Los Pinos). At the mass rally, family members of the 43 disappeared students spoke to the demonstrators. None of the major political parties (the governing PRI, the PAN, the PRD, the Greens) were involved in the protest.

More, HERE.
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Mexico Disarms Local Police in Missing Students’ City

By Press TV,Global Research, October 07, 2014

Mexican federal forces have disarmed the entire police department in the southern city of Iguala after its officers were accused of collaborating with a gang behind the recent disappearance of 43 students.

On Monday, the government’s new federal police unit took over security in Iguala, located some 200 kilometers (125 miles) south of the capital, Mexico City.

The federal unit was tasked with holding order in the city and helping search for the students who went missing last month after a deadly police shooting.

The deployment in the southern violence-stricken state of Guerrero came after President Enrique Pena Nieto vowed to establish justice and bring an end to corruption in the country.

Pena Nieto said he had dispatched the federal forces to Iguala to “find out what happened and apply the full extent of the law to those responsible.”The decision to disarm Iguala’s police corps came just days after 28 charred bodies were found in a mass grave on the outskirts of the city.

State prosecutor Inaky Blanco has said the recovered bodies probably belonged to the missing students. State officials also say it will take up to two weeks to receive the results of DNA tests to identify the corpses.

The students, all trainee teachers, went missing following a police attack on September 26 against a protest over teachers’ rights.

According to Blanco, state investigators have obtained video footage showing local police arresting a number of students during the clashes and taking them away.

Prosecutors said the Guerreros Unidos drug gang also participated in the police shooting that left six people dead and 25 others wounded.

Mexican authorities have already arrested 22 officers and issued arrest warrants for Iguala mayor Jose Luis Albarca and his security chief over the deadly incident.

More, HERE.

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Militarization and Political Crisis in Mexico

Is Mexico a Narco-State?

By Michael Werbowski;Global Research, May 31, 2010

Mexico - In the wake of Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s recent state visit to the U.S and Canada, a burning question remains without any clear answer.

2010 is historically significant for Mexico. It is its bi-centennial year of independence ( in 1810 the country began to break free from Spanish imperial tutelage) and perhaps more significantly is is also the centenary year of the 1910 Mexican revolution. There is little to celebrate though. The country this year, is still reeling from the vortex of drug-trafficking crimes, the global economic down-turn and the fall-out from the histrionics and panic induced by the H1N1-Swine flu “pandemic” of 2009.

Mexico after a decade of the centre-right almost “corporatist” PAN ( National Action Party) party’s rule, ( as in 2000, the first PAN candidate won the presidency, Vincente Fox) has been practically “Balkanised”. And as a result, it is now faced with a crippling fragmentation of the federation itself, due mainly to territorial battles or “turf wars” going on between rival drug cartels, which operate almost with impunity in many Mexican states. Possibly, the most fascinating and insightful read on this phenomenal topic is: Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State? . While I was pondering over the question raised by the book’s title , I was somewhat astonished to read in (despite what I witnessed first hand in Mexico) the concluding chapter, a rather reassuring reply. That basically, Mexico is far from becoming another Somalia, Pakistan or Haiti.

More, HERE.

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Destabilizing Mexico

By Rev. Richard Skaff; Global Research, March 13, 2009

Attorney General Eric Holder stated on February 25, 2009 that Mexican drug cartels pose a national security threat, and issued a direct warning to these cartels that they will be destroyed.

The warning came as the attorney general and acting Drug Enforcement Administration chief Michele Leonhart announced the completion of the final phase of DEA’s “Operation Xcellerator,” which targeted the Sinaloa cartel, a major western Mexico drug operation that has been expanding its reach into the United States . [1].

Meanwhile, the blood shed in the Mexican cities continues to be extensive and has expanded its tentacles of violence to various cities in Mexico. Lawlessness, corruption, murders, decapitations, and kidnappings have taken the Mexican cities by a storm, giving rise to a new radical group calling itself the Juarez Citizens Command that is threatening to strike back against lawlessness that has gripped Mexico for a long time. The group stated that they are going to strike back by killing one criminal a day until order and peace is restored. Similar groups are popping up all across Mexico. [2].

In its last report, the US Department of justice disclosed that 17.2 billion dollars in cash entered Mexico in only the past two years as a result of money laundering operation in their country. The report advised that Mexico and Colombia are the principal destinations of narco resources that operate in the US and that “the laundering of drug money is a global industry” with transnational organizations present in various countries. [2].

According to a DEA undercover operative, the Mexican drug cartels have gained more and more of the American market. They have grown bolder in their attempts to expand their operations in Mexico and the United States . They now control the ruling party in Mexico and operate the biggest drug business on earth right here in the USA . [2].

Mexico’s drug and violence problem now engulfs the entire country, inundating cities along the U.S.-Mexico border. The robust drug cartel reduced its position in the western mountains, and lunged into the heart of national power in Mexico City. The capital that was once relatively immune to such contemptuous boldness of drug killings has become the scene of multiple assassinations of high-ranking federal police officials in about a week. More than 1,000 people have been killed in Mexico this year in drug-related violence and about 6,290 in 2008. [11].

More, HERE.

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MORE MEXICO ARTICLES, BY GLOBAL RESEARCH, HERE

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New Evidence Proves Israel Attacked USS Liberty With Orders to Kill 294 Americans

By Aaron Nelson;Global Research, November 14, 2014

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US Government Sanitizes Vietnam War History

By Marjorie Cohn, Global Research, October 30, 2014, Marjoriecohn.com

For many years after the Vietnam War, we enjoyed the “Vietnam syndrome,” in which US presidents hesitated to launch substantial military attacks on other countries. They feared intense opposition akin to the powerful movement that helped bring an end to the war in Vietnam. But in 1991, at the end of the Gulf War, George H.W. Bush declared,

“By God, we’ve kicked the Vietnam syndrome once and for all!”

With George W. Bush’s wars on Iraq and Afghanistan, and Barack Obama’s drone wars in seven Muslim-majority countries and his escalating wars in Iraq and Syria, we have apparently moved beyond the Vietnam syndrome. By planting disinformation in the public realm, the government has built support for its recent wars, as it did with Vietnam.

Now the Pentagon is planning to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War by launching a $30 million program to rewrite and sanitize its history. Replete with a fancy interactive website, the effort is aimed at teaching schoolchildren a revisionist history of the war. The program is focused on honoring our service members who fought in Vietnam. But conspicuously absent from the website is a description of the antiwar movement, at the heart of which was the GI movement.

Thousands of GIs participated in the antiwar movement.

More, HERE.

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Ottawa Lockdown (22 Oct 2014 - TD Photo)

Prime Minister Steven Harper is using the shooting rampage on Parliament Hill as a justification for imposing broad surveillance and detainment measures that were already being implemented.

Copyright © 2005-2014 GlobalResearch.ca

 

Scandal in Mexico: A murky mortgage

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa Was a Crime of the State - See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Questions surround the purchase of a house owned by the finance minister

Dec 12th 2014

Mexico’s growing crisis: Reforms and democracy, but no rule of law

Nov 13th 2014

To save a promising presidency, Enrique Peña Nieto must tackle crime and corruption

From the print edition

DURING two years in office Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has received sharply contrasting reviews at home and abroad. Foreigners, including The Economist, have praised his structural reforms of the economy, which include an historic measure to open up energy to private investment (see article). Yet polls show that most Mexicans dislike Mr Peña. Among other things, they blame his government for a squeeze on living standards and the interlinked problems of violent crime and corruption. Sadly, recent events have lent support to Mr Peña’s domestic critics.

On November 8th Mexico’s attorney-general announced what almost everyone had already concluded: that 43 students from a teacher-training college in the southern state of Guerrero, who disappeared in the town of Iguala in late September, had been murdered by drug-traffickers after being kidnapped by the local police on the orders of the town’s mayor. Guerrero has been Mexico’s most violent state for centuries. The federal government bears no direct responsibility for these events. But Mexicans see in them a symbol of the failure of Mr Peña’s administration to make security a priority.

Now comes a problem that is uncomfortably close to home. The government had already opted to cancel a contract for a high-speed train that it had hastily awarded to the sole bidder, a consortium of Chinese and Mexican companies including a construction firm from the president’s home state. A local journalist has revealed that the boss of the same firm owns a $7m mansion that is the Peña family’s private residence (see article). The president denies any wrongdoing, but a common thread runs through these events.

Mexico only became a democracy in 2000, when seven decades of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the political machine that raised Mr Peña, were ended by electoral defeat. Unfortunately, democracy did not bring the rule of law to Mexico. Too many in the PRI still see the job of the police and the courts as enforcing political control, rather than investigating mobsters. Corrupt politicians are protected rather than punished. Organised crime and graft both remain a part of everyday life, and neither has been helped by the drugs flowing north to the United States.

More, HERE.

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Victims of Mexico’s drug war

Tracing the missing

Many thousands disappeared in Mexico’s drug war. The government should do more to find them

Mexico’s economy

Jam mañana

A frustrating start to the year

 

May 24th 2014 | MEXICO CITY | From the print edition

SO FAR this year Mexico’s government has resembled one of the country’s many devotees of St Jude, patron saint of lost causes. It has doggedly stuck to a 3.9% 2014 growth forecast, even though its main export market, the United States, has been sluggish, and the twin pillars of its domestic economy—buying and building—have fared even worse.

On May 21st the central bank revised its growth prediction down to 2.3-3.3%, from 3-4% previously. The government was expected finally to follow suit on May 23rd, when first-quarter GDP figures were due to be released. Even so, officials are convinced that within months the benefits of its plans to modernise the economy will start to show up in the numbers.

Mexicans have good reason to be sceptical.

More, HERE.

 

Copyright © The Economist Newspaper Limited 2013. All rights reserved.

The Guardian

 

Snowden voted person of the year


Edward Snowden
In May Edward Snowden flew to Hong Kong where he gave journalists the material which blew the lid on the extent of US digital spying. Photograph: The Guardian/AFP/Getty Images

 

For the second year in a row, a young American whistleblower alarmed at the unfettered and at times cynical deployment of power by the world's foremost superpower has been voted the Guardian's person of the year.

Edward Snowden, who leaked an estimated 200,000 files that exposed the extensive and intrusive nature of phone and internet surveillance and intelligence gathering by the US and its western allies, was the overwhelming choice of more than 2,000 people who voted.

The NSA whistleblower garnered 1,445 votes. In a distant second, from a list of 10 candidates chosen by Guardian writers and editors, came Marco Weber and Sini Saarela, the Greenpeace activists who spearheaded the oil rig protest over Russian Arctic drilling. They received 314 votes. Pope Francis gained 153 votes, narrowly ahead of blogger and anti-poverty campaigner Jack Monroe, who received 144.
Snowden's victory was as decisive as Chelsea Manning's a year earlier.

More, HERE.

© 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.

latimes.com

Click on HERE to get the latest Los Angeles Times News

Company stores trap Mexican farmworkers in cycle of debt

General store

The mom-and-pop monopolies sell to a captive clientele, post no prices and track purchases in dog-eared ledgers. At the end of the harvest, many workers head home owing money.

On a Mexican mega-farm: 'They treated us like slaves'

Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

Tornado touches down in South L.A., damaging 5 homes

Estimate: California's 10-day rainfall totaled 10 trillion gallons

Forecasters: Storm cycle not over; next week will be wet

Chinese money drives growth in El Monte

Construction of a 133-room Hilton Garden Inn is part of an unprecedented wave of Chinese investment in the working-class, mostly Latino city.

U.S. wary of Islamic State fighters training in Libya

Portland police make arrest in school shooting

Taliban kill 12 workers clearing mines in Afghanistan

Spy satellite launched off California's coast

California Chabad group must pay nearly $850,000 for misusing grant

Trash dump discovery points to Mexico's missing students

One of 43 missing Mexican students identified among remains

By This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

December 6, 2014

Nearly 10 weeks after 43 college students in Mexico were kidnapped by police, forensic experts have identified a bone found among remains in a trash dump as belonging to one of the missing men, the school and federal officials said Saturday.

This would be a key clue in discovering the fate of the students, last seen Sept. 26 in the city of Iguala, in Guerrero state,  after a deadly confrontation with police acting on the orders of the mayor, according to the government.

A message on the college's Facebook page said Argentine forensic investigators, whom the families brought to inspect remains, had notified the father of Alexander Mora, one of the students, that a bone had been identified as the young man’s.

A spokesperson for the federal attorney general’s office also confirmed that an identification had been made but would not divulge the name until a news conference Sunday.

More, HERE.

Mexico & the Americas

Climate talks slowed by clashes of rich and poor nations

A Times Investigation

Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

A Times reporter and photographer find that thousands of laborers on Mexico's mega-farms endure harsh conditions and exploitation while supplying produce for American consumers.

SEE THE STORY

Accusations fly as State Bar of California leader fights ouster

More rain, colder weather on tap for Southland

Cooler weather may boost crowds at South L.A.'s first CicLAvia

Obama calls for persistence, patience amid 'deeply rooted' racism

Dianne Feinstein leaving intelligence job amid clash on tactics report

Brian Bennett

Feinstein's tenure as head of the Senate Intelligence Committee is closing amid an acrimonious fight over a project that pits her against the CIA.

For thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the boom in agricultural exports is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship. On Sunday, read the first story in our four-part series "Product of Mexico."

Teenagers plead not guilty in beating death of homeless man in Santee

Six teenagers pleaded not guilty Wednesday to murder and assault charges in an incident in Santee that left one homeless man dead and another severely beaten.

CALIFORNIA

Silicon Valley homeless camp no longer welcome

LAPD seeks help identifying hit-and-run driver who injured child

Beck faults LAPD officers in killing of unarmed man

The three officers violated department rules for using deadly force after a high-speed chase Dec. 13, the chief says. He rejects the officers' claims that they feared for their lives.

Clearing of officer in N.Y. chokehold death sparks protests

Cleveland officer who killed boy, 12, previously deemed unfit for duty

Mandatory DNA collection during arrest is unconstitutional, court says

How L.A. Unified got its iPad contract

11 dead, scores wounded in Grozny terrorist attack

Japanese space explorer to blow crater in asteroid

Barack Obama and Mitch McConnell: Why can't they be friends?

Self-employed find it's not easy to get a mortgage

Tim Logan

Many self-employed borrowers earn more than their salaried peers but have a harder time getting a mortgage. As the ranks of the self-employed grow, that hinders the housing recovery.

Stylists doing time offer fellow inmates a touch-up

Cindy Chang

Women in jail can't ditch their uniforms, but they can change their hair, and they say looking their best does wonders for their self-esteem. But no scissors are allowed.

Obama may lose chief justice with executive act

David G. Savage

By claiming the power to forge ahead based on his executive authority, the president may well lose the one conservative he still really needs.

I5 briefly closed to airlift child, 4, critically hurt in crash

Islamic State militants kill 15 Iraqi police near Syrian border

Supreme Court to debate whether Facebook threats are free speech

Prop. 65's warning signs of chemical hazards may require more detail

Mudslide that closed PCH may only be the beginning

Forecasters warn that rains that have already closed the coastal highway in Ventura County could wash loose mud and rocks in burn areas above Azusa and Glendora.

Mexican activist who fed train-hopping immigrants is slain

A Mexican good Samaritan who dedicated his scarce resources to feeding Central American migrants passing by on La Bestia train was slain this week along with a friend who assisted him, fellow activists said Wednesday.

LAPD arrests about 130 Ferguson protesters in downtown L.A.

The number surpasses arrests in other major U.S. cities on the third night of protests over the grand jury decision in the killing of Michael Brown by a white police officer.

Business

Marijuana legalization backers anxious as costs mount, donors waver

Prop. 47 floods courts with inmate pleas; hundreds already freed

Ferguson grand jury witnesses often cited fear in testifying

Tina Susman

One describes being called a snitch. Some fear upsetting their neighbors. Another says, 'I've seen the Ferguson police do some really awful things.'

Lewis Baltz dies at 69; photographer of stark, postmodern isolation

Israel says it foiled Hamas plot for large-scale attacks

5 killed in suicide attack on British Embassy vehicle in Afghanistan

Cricketer Phillip Hughes dies after being struck by cricket ball

Ferguson staggered by night of violence; scores arrested

The small St. Louis suburb is reeling after hours of fiery looting in the wake of a grand jury decision not to charge a white police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man last summer.SEE THE STORY

Ferguson live updates: Over 80 arrests in area, at least a dozen burned buildings

Dozens have been arrested in the violent aftermath of the grand jury's decision. Bottles and rocks are thrown at police and dozens of buildings burned.

Protests in Los Angeles, Oakland result in arrests

Multiple people were arrested as protesters took to the streets in Los Angeles and Oakland to vent their rage after the grand jury decision in Missouri.

Darren Wilson, recalling shooting, said Michael Brown looked like a demon

Chief Beck warns anybody considering violence in L.A., 'We will make arrests'

Justice Department likely to impose reforms on Ferguson police

Home Depot faces dozens of breach-related lawsuits

Tall freeway spans will be relatively safe in quakes, Caltrans says

Rallies across UC system protest tuition hikes

Winter storm may bring chaos to Thanksgiving travel plans

Hong Kong police arrest dozens, disperse pro-democracy activists

Among those arrested were city legislator Leung Kwok-hung and a junior high school student leader.

Michael Hanline, wrongly convicted in 1978 killing, is freed

Exit sign on 710 Freeway misspells Olympic Boulevard as 'Olimpic'

Huge abuse-case settlement has LAUSD rethinking reforms

Howard Blume, Stephen Ceasar

The $139-million tab in the Mark Berndt case has the superintendent and others considering how the district can better protect students from sexual misconduct by adults.

Pentagon operation name for Islamic State fight inspires criticism

Man shot to death by Long Beach police officer is identified

University of Virginia suspends fraternities after rape allegations

Escaped bighorn sheep that was struck by car near L.A. Zoo dies

Possible far-left comeback sends ripples through German politics

Woman ruled innocent in 1997 slaying; payment for prison time expected

Ninety-eight years later, LAPD takes time to remember one of its own

Copyright 2014

MICHAEL MOORE

 

You Tube

Nixon before resignation and full speech, August 8, 1974

Protests in response to Israel’s assault on Gaza have drawn hundreds — and in some cases thousands — around the world.

 

Megyn Kelly To Dick Cheney: 'History Has Proven' You Were Wrong on Iraq Dick Cheney Kelly File.

 

You Tube

'Citizen Koch' ... the movie they didn't want you to see

Meet Governor(s) Pay-to Pay

 

Charles Baker, GOP nominee for governor in Massachusetts, gave $10,000 to New Jersey's Republican State Committee and hosted a fundraiser for Chris Christie – which happens to be flagrantly illegal, since Baker worked for a venture capital firm that shortly thereafter got a contract to manage New Jersey public pension funds

SPIEGEL ONLINE

Inside TAO: Documents Reveal Top NSA Hacking Unit

By SPIEGEL Staff

 

The article you are reading originally appeared in German in issue 1/2014 (December 30, 2013) of DER SPIEGEL.

 

Targeting Mexico

 

Mexico's Secretariat of Public Security, which was folded into the new National Security Commission at the beginning of 2013, was responsible at the time for the country's police, counterterrorism, prison system and border police. Most of the agency's nearly 20,000 employees worked at its headquarters on Avenida Constituyentes, an important traffic artery in Mexico City. A large share of the Mexican security authorities under the auspices of the Secretariat are supervised from the offices there, making Avenida Constituyentes a one-stop shop for anyone seeking to learn more about the country's security apparatus.

 

More, HERE.

Fresh Leak on US Spying: NSA Accessed Mexican President's Email

By Jens Glüsing, Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

'Royal Concierge': GCHQ Monitors Diplomats' Hotel Bookings

By Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

Quantum Spying: GCHQ Used Fake LinkedIn Pages to Target Engineers

Oil Espionage: How the NSA and GCHQ Spied on OPEC

Belgacom Attack: Britain's GCHQ Hacked Belgian Telecoms Firm

Cyber Attack: Belgians Angered by British Spying

By Gregor Peter Schmitz in Brussels

 

© SPIEGEL ONLINE 2013, All Rights Reserved

Fox News

US intelligence assets in Mexico reportedly tied to murdered DEA agent

SCM's Travel Advisory:


September 11 attacks on World Trade Center by Wikipedia

 

Mexicans are advised to exercise MAXIMUM CAUTION, monitor developments that might affect your safety in the United States because of Hate Crimes. The FBI reports that hate crimes against Latinos rose almost 40 percent between 2003 and 2006, and Hispanic activists say they are being targeted with threats and intimidation.

This is just a recent incident: STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- A rash of recent assaults on Mexican immigrants has heightened tensions in Port Richmond, already on edge following the savage beating of a 25-year-old baker earlier this (April 2010) month.

 

In addition, no matter what your nationality the US in under permanent risk of terrorism. Visitors could be caught up in attacks targeted at American, British, Canadian, Australian citizens, others. Terrorists may attack official or civilian targets. Crime rates are higher in the larger cities, such as New York, Los Angeles and Chicago.

 

Many parts of the United States are subject to different natural hazards, including earthquakes, fires or wildfires, floods, extreme heat, hurricanes, landslides and debris flow (mudslides), thunderstorms and lightning, tornadoes, tsunamis, volcanoes (Hawaii, Alaska and Pacific Northwest), winter storms (freezing rain, heavy snow and blizzards) and extreme cold.

 

Tourists are often targeted for petty crimes such as pick-pocketing and theft, particularly on public transport. It is recommended that before visiting your destination point, Google it and write NAME OF CITY TO BE VISITED, then "crime, areas to be avoided & gang activities" to determine your level of threat.  

Come Back Alive, a site dedicated to Dangerous Countries writes on quote: 

"There are more than 200 million guns in the possession of Americans. Most violent acts in the States are the result of robberies, domestic disputes and drug-related violence.

 

Terrorist acts, ranging from the killing of abortionist doctors to the bombing of the World Trade Center, are highly publicized but not considered a real threat to travelers. The threat of robbery or violent crime in inner cities and some tourist areas is real and should be taken seriously. Travel in America is considered safe (by .. Americans), and danger is confined to random violence and inner cities.

 

Those seeking adventure can find it in a New Orleans bar at five in the morning or strolling through South Central L.A. after midnight." .. 

TRAVEL ADVISORY: The Southern Poverty Law Center counted 932 active hate groups in the United States in 2009. Only organizations and their chapters known to be active during 2009 are included. More, HERE.

Oct. 29, 2009 Washington Post: Obama signs hate crimes law

You Tube

------------
HATE CRIMES

RACISM AND ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION, by ABC News

MEXICAN HATE RALLY

The New Sport: Latino Hate Crime, ABC News

Mexican beaten by 3 racist Blacks on Staten Island, New York

US Border Patrol Agent Shoots Dead Mexican Teen on Mexican Soil

Border agent details immigrant abuse

Discrimination Against Latinos

American Heritage- KKK Lynching

 

Redneck Attacks Mexican flag

 

-------------------------------------------

TERRORISM, DRUGS

New report exposes CIA torture & rendition by Nick Harper

MUST-READ Book: Cocaine Politics by Peter Dale Scott

Drugs and the Economy - Peter Dale Scott

Gary Webb on C.I.A. Trafficking of Cocaine

CIA Torture Jet crashed with 4 Tons of COCAINE

Former LA Police Officer Mike Ruppert Confronts CIA Director

'I don't think drug trafficking will ever be stopped': Inside the world of the U.S. agent who went undercover with the cartels:

Mail Online, UK

Celerino Castillo, by Wikipedia

Powderburns

Marijuana legalization wins majority support in poll: Los Angeles Times

Marijuana, Officially Legal in Colorado

In 2006, former Mexican president Felipe Calderón launched a massive crackdown against drug trafficking organizations, in conjunction with the United States. Since then, more than 40,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence: Council On

Foreign Relations

Washington State Gears Up for Marijuana Industry: Voice of America

Marijuana Legalization Canada: Liberal Party Lays Out Detailed Economic Plan For Pot: The Huffington Post, Canada

England Wants To Legalize Marijuana Through Cannabis Drug Reform: Inquisitr. Ltd.

More HERE.

A change of scenery by Washington Post

U.S. citizens traveling internationally in 2012, by destination

A change of scenery
Source: Office of Travel and Tourism Industries, Commerce Department. The Washington Post. Published on May 24, 2013

Image Credit

Mexico Travel Warning

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling to certain places in Mexico due to threats to safety and security posed by organized criminal groups in the country.

U.S. citizens have been the target of violent crimes, such as kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery by organized criminal groups in various Mexican states.  For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, which can vary, travelers should reference the state-by-state assessments further below.  This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

General Conditions: 

Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year for study, tourism, and business, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day.  The Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations, and there is no evidence that organized criminal groups have targeted U.S. visitors or residents based on their nationality.  Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that are reported in the border region or in areas along major trafficking routes. 

Nevertheless, U.S. travelers should be aware that the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter organized criminal groups that engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico.  The groups themselves are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity.  Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur anywhere.  U.S. citizens have fallen victim to criminal activity, including homicide, gun battles, kidnapping, carjacking, and highway robbery.  While many of those killed in organized crime-related violence have themselves been involved in criminal activity, innocent persons have also been killed.  The number of U.S. citizens reported to the Department of State as murdered in Mexico was 71 in 2012 and 81 in 2013. 

Gun battles between rival criminal organizations or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico.  Gun battles have occurred in broad daylight on streets and in other public venues, such as restaurants and clubs.  During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily prevented from leaving the area. Criminal organizations have used stolen cars, buses, and trucks to create roadblocks on major thoroughfares, preventing the military and police from responding to criminal activity. The location and timing of future armed engagements is unpredictable.  We recommend that you defer travel to the areas specifically identified in this Travel Warning and exercise extreme caution when traveling throughout the other areas for which advisories are in effect.

The number of kidnappings throughout Mexico is of particular concern and appears to be on the rise.  According to statistics published by the Mexican Secretaria de Gobernacion (SEGOB), in 2013 kidnappings nationwide increased 20 percent over the previous year.  While kidnappings can occur anywhere, according to SEGOB, during this timeframe, the states with the highest numbers of kidnappings were Tamaulipas, Guerrero, Michoacán, Estado de Mexico, and Morelos.

Additionally, according to a widely publicized study by the agency responsible for national statistics (INEGI, the National Institute of Statistics and Geography), Mexico suffered an estimated 105,682 kidnappings in 2012; only 1,317 were reported to the police.  Police have been implicated in some of these incidents.  Both local and expatriate communities have been victimized.  Nearly 70 kidnappings of U.S. citizens were reported to the U.S. Embassy and consulates in Mexico between January and June of 2014.

U.S. citizens are encouraged to lower their personal profiles and to avoid displaying indicators of wealth such as expensive or expensive-looking jewelry, watches, or cameras.  U.S. citizens are encouraged to maintain awareness of their surroundings and avoid situations in which they may be isolated or stand out as potential victims.

Kidnappings in Mexico have included traditional, "express," and "virtual" kidnappings. Victims of traditional kidnappings are physically abducted and held captive until a ransom is paid for release.  "Express" kidnappings are those in which a victim is abducted for a short time and forced to withdraw money, usually from an ATM, then released.  A "virtual" kidnapping is an extortion-by-deception scheme wherein a victim is contacted by phone and convinced to isolate themselves from family and friends until a ransom is paid.  The victim is coerced (by threat of violence) to remain isolated and to provide phone numbers for the victim's family or loved ones.  The victim's family is then contacted and a ransom for the "kidnapped" extracted.  Recently, some travelers to Mexico staying at hotels as guests have been targets of such "virtual" kidnapping schemes.

Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other ga