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Did Raul Castro Just Reverse The Entire Cuban Revolution?: Global Research; Cuba Deal Opens Front For U. S. Political Clashes; Marco Rubio's Fury Over The Cuba Shift; Upgrades At US Border Crossing Thrill Commuters; Death Toll In Michoacan Rises To 11
Thursday, 18 December 2014 11:28

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The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners - Public Service

For a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper or news site through the use of its journalistic resources, including the use of stories, editorials, cartoons, photographs, graphics, videos, databases, multimedia or interactive presentations or other visual material, a gold medal. Awarded to The Washington Post for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security. and Awarded to The Guardian US for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, helping through aggressive reporting to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.

Finalists also nominated as a finalist in this category was Newsday, Long Island, N.Y., for its use of in-depth reporting and digital tools to expose shootings, beatings and other concealed misconduct by some Long Island police officers, leading to the formation of a grand jury and an official review of police accountability.

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INTERNATIONAL

Cuba deal opens front for U.S. political clashes

Karen Tumulty and Anne Gearan 

GOP critics denounced Obama’s move as overreaching and naive, but there’s growing public support to end the divide.

Obama acts to reestablish ties

In 15 minutes, Obama showcases entire foreign policy philosophy

How will Cuba now justify its strict economic controls?

Nick Miroff

If tensions with U.S. ease, Cubans will increasingly look inward at the failings of their anachronistic system.

18 months of secret diplomacy ended hostility

Carol Morello and Karen DeYoung

It started with an American overture and a series of nine meetings in Canada. Later, the pope intervened.

Five decades of animosity died quietly


Fidel Castro speaks to supporters at a Cuban military base in 1959. (AP)

Manuel Roig-Franzia

The changes won’t heal all wounds, but it has fundamentally altered an artifact of American foreign policy.

Timeline: A difficult history between U.S. and Cuba

From Fidel Castro to Raul Castro, decades of conflict

U.S. spy, never before disclosed, was vital

Adam Goldman

The White House said the Cuban-born spy helped unravel several long-running Cuban espionage operations.

Morning Mix

 

Stories from all over

George Stinney, Jr. before his 1944 execution. (State of South Carolina)

George Stinney, Jr. before his 1944 execution. (State of South Carolina)

The conviction, execution and exoneration of George Stinney, Jr.

The 1944 railroading of a 14-year-old boy and his exoneration 70 years later.

Despite bad economic news, Putin says Russia will recover in 2 years

Despite bad economic news, Putin says Russia will recover in 2  years
The Russian president tried to reassure his country despite a looming recession.

4 highlights from Putin’s epic news conference

Which nominees advance? Which flounder? Democrats strategize.

Which nominees advance? Which flounder?  Democrats strategize.
Experts say it will be increasingly difficult for Obama to win approval of his executive branch nominees.

4 Pinocchios for claim that 80 percent of Congress never traveled overseas

4 Pinocchios for claim that 80 percent of Congress never traveled overseas
FACT CHECKER | The Russian foreign minister calls Congress “a very special group of people.”

Farewell, Stephen Colbert. The giant ego was an act, but our grief is real.

Farewell, Stephen Colbert. The giant ego was an act, but our grief is real.

U.S. concludes that North Korea is behind damaging Sony hack

U.S. concludes that North Korea <br />is behind damaging Sony hack
Bowing to threats, Sony Pictures cancels the Christmas Day release of “The Interview.”

Wonkbook: Sony’s decision could cost $104M

Stop denying a gender pay gap exists. Even Jennifer Lawrence was cheated.

Stop denying a gender pay gap exists. Even Jennifer Lawrence was cheated.
POSTEVERYTHING | The Sony e-mail hack revealed even rich and famous women are devalued.

In love, opposites don’t attract — and that’s a big problem for inequality

In love, opposites don’t attract —  and that’s a big problem for inequality
WONKBLOG | A study suggests that U.S. children will more likely imitate their parents’ lifestyle in the future.

Elf on the Shelf is preparing your child to live in a police state, prof warns

Elf on the Shelf is preparing your child to live in a police state, prof warns The toy “normalizes the idea of surveillance,” says digital technology professor Laura Pinto.

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MEXICO NEWS

Image Credit

Motorists at the nation's busiest border crossing were accustomed to waiting hours while vendors paraded between lanes with everything from sliced papaya and hot oatmeal to sombreros and ceramic mugs. Now, thanks to a $741 million construction project, they may not have enough time to lower their windows and order a cappuccino.
A Mexican official says the death toll from a clash between two rural police groups has risen to 11.
A federal judge dismissed criminal charges on Monday against two women who witnessed the June 30 army killing of suspected drug gang members in southern Mexico.
A selection of our best images of 2014 from Latin America and the Caribbean starts with the case of 43 missing - and apparently slain - students in Mexico that ignited indignation across the country and around the world. Officials acknowledged they disappeared at the hands of a corrupt local government and federal authorities took 10 days to intervene.
Mexico is ready to intervene in currency markets to fight the peso's fall against the dollar amid concerns over dropping oil prices and a possible increase in U.S. interest rates.

Mexicans’ search for students’ bodies reveals a history of hidden deaths


Guillermina Sotelo Castañeda holds a photo of her son. (J. Levinson for Post)

Joshua Partlow

Forty-three students went missing in September, but they were hardly the first. Their abduction by police has let loose a flood of new accusations.

In Mexico's forest of the disappeared

© 1996-2010 The Washington Post Company

GLOBAL RESEARCH

Did Raul Castro Just Reverse The Entire Cuban Revolution?

Global Research, December 18, 2014

Raul Castro may have potentially made a fatal mistake that risks destroying everything the Cuban Revolution built over the past half century. By entering into a deal with the US, he’s letting the wily Color Revolution fox into the hen house, and he’s also betraying his multipolar Russian ally at the same time.
Havana and Washington entered into a surprise deal yesterday to historically restore their relations after engaging in a high-profile prisoner swap. Nobody was expecting such a major development to occur, making many wonder how such an impactful decision could be kept under wraps for so long. The reason being was likely that the US understood what a major hemispheric power play this was and wanted to do everything to safeguard its secret strategy.

On the contrary, Cuba, whether its leadership realizes it or not, has everything to lose, and it’s clear from the details that Washington was ‘negotiating’ from a position of strength. While Raul may have thought he could outmaneuver the imminent Color Revolution attempt that will occur after Fidel’s death, he may have actually committed a Yanukovich-esque tactical mistake by trying to enter into agreement with the same forces obsessed with his ouster.

Modern Lessons

Before diving in to the nitty-gritty of Raul’s decision, it is necessary to quickly take an overview of two monumental lessons of the past few years that should not have been lost on any global leader:

More, HERE.
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justice
Any person involved in the chain of command that authorized the crimes detailed in the Senate Torture Report should be indicted for war crimes and conspiracy. This includes George W. Bush, Richard Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, CIA officials who condoned such practices, attorneys who authorized such practices.
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torture
The Senate committee report on CIA torture ultimately upholds the legitimacy of the US intelligence apparatus, the US government, its military and intelligence agenda and its “humanitarian wars” waged in different parts of the World.
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Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa was a Crime of the State

By Richard Roman and Edur Velasco Arregui
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iraqichildren
“From the beginning of humankind there has been brutality, conflict, intrigue, the destructive obsession with a narrow self-interest”, said Blair in acceptance. Freudian slip or what. He praised “the magnificent American and British Military” with Save The Children and other NGOs for their work in Africa.
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ISIL invasion

The US led war against the Islamic State is a big lie. Going after ”Islamic terrorists” is used to justify a military agenda. The Islamic State is a creation of US intelligence. Washington’s “Counter-terrorism Agenda” in Iraq & Syria consists in Supporting the Terrorists.
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Disappeared Students in Mexico: Global Struggle for Ayotzinapa Captures World’s Attention

By Telesur Global Research, November 22, 2014
More than 200 actions were carried out Thursday, coinciding with Mexico’s Day of Revolution.

A student’s skin was peeled over his head in a gruesome and clear display of a narco-state murder. The photo of the murder, which took place in the drug war-torn state of Guerrero some seven weeks ago, quickly went viral on the Internet. On the same day, five other people were killed and some 43 more students went “missing” in the small town of Ayotzinapa. In a press conference addressing the abuses more than one month after the disappearance of the students, who hailed from a rural-based and selective teachers college in Guerrero, an Attorney General presumed them “dead” without presenting any evidence to substantiate his conclusion. The nation’s leading prosecutor said he was “tired” by the end of the press conference, much to the chagrin of those who sympathized with the plight of the parents of the disappeared students.

Those happenings have served as the sparks that have ignited the nation’s ire to a feverish boiling point in one of the largest countries and economies of Latin America. Mexico has witnessed near daily and nation-wide actions of resistance. Since the disappearance of the “normalistas” (students training to be teachers) on September 26, the country has been brimming with mass marches, candle-light vigils, university-campus and labor-union-led strikes, occupations of official and university buildings, riot police-led arrests of demonstrators, property destruction of official buildings, sit-ins, panels ruminating over the ills of narco-state violence and international bridge closings.

While the 43 students, who are technically still missing due to the lack of any corpses being forensically tied to the students, were what clearly catalyzed the movement’s inception, much of the country has long been weary of the systematic problem of disappearances and the eery official impunity which has often surrounded them. Nothing less than some 24,000 disappearances, over the course of the last three years alone, account for official estimates. Other analysts estimate the actual total as being far higher than that.

The Mayor of Iguala and his wife, dubbed as the “imperial couple,” were arrested several weeks ago, as teleSUR previously reported. At the time of their arrest, speculation was that their detention may produce valuable clues that could help solve the case of the disappeared students. However, no significant advances have been made in the case since the detention of the couple. At the time of their arrest, the on-the-run couple were fugitives from the law and in hiding when authorities busted them at a rented home in Itzapalapa, Mexico City.

More, HERE.

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Angry Protests Sweep Mexico after Government Says Missing Students are Dead


Global Research, November 11, 2014
Angry protests swept Mexico over the weekend in the wake of a press conference Friday in which Jesús Murillo Karam, the country’s attorney general, declared that 43 missing teaching students from the Ayotzinapa Normal School in the state of Guerrero are all dead. Murrillo based this evaluation on confessions by gang members that they had killed the students, who were handed over to them by the police, and then burned their bodies.
Demonstrations in both Mexico City and the Guerrero capital of Chilpancingo saw clashes with police and attacks on government buildings. In the capital, a small group of demonstrators launched an attack on the historic National Palace in the city’s main square (El Zócalo). They first used metal security barriers to ram the building’s wooden door and then doused it with gasoline and set it on fire.
Some demonstrators questioned why it took police so long to respond to these acts, suggesting that they could have been the work of provocateurs.
More, HERE.

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More than 100,000 March in Mexico City over Disappeared Students

By Rafael Azul; Global Research, November 07, 2014
A mass protest march of more than 100,000 students, teachers, education workers and ordinary citizens took place in Mexico City on Wednesday, November 5, in solidarity with the 43 missing teaching students, normalistas, of the Ayotzinapa Normal School, who have been missing for over 40 days.
This was the third mass demonstration and by far the largest and angriest. Many of the participants directed their anger at President Enrique Peña Nieto, demanding that he resign. One protest sign denounced him “for corruption, betraying the nation, ineptitude,” calling him a “repressor and assassin.”
Others carried signs that said, “It was the State.” Leading the march were students from Mexico City’s National Autonomous Metropolitan University (UNAM), the Polytechnic Institute, rural teaching colleges, and Iberian-American University, who all had joined a massive nationwide 72-hour student strike.
At Mexico City’s Constitution Square (the Zócalo), many thousands greeted the protesters as they arrived after the two-and-a-half-hour march from the president’s mansion (Los Pinos). At the mass rally, family members of the 43 disappeared students spoke to the demonstrators. None of the major political parties (the governing PRI, the PAN, the PRD, the Greens) were involved in the protest.
More, HERE.
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Mexico Disarms Local Police in Missing Students’ City

By Press TV,Global Research, October 07, 2014
Mexican federal forces have disarmed the entire police department in the southern city of Iguala after its officers were accused of collaborating with a gang behind the recent disappearance of 43 students.
On Monday, the government’s new federal police unit took over security in Iguala, located some 200 kilometers (125 miles) south of the capital, Mexico City.

The federal unit was tasked with holding order in the city and helping search for the students who went missing last month after a deadly police shooting.
The deployment in the southern violence-stricken state of Guerrero came after President Enrique Pena Nieto vowed to establish justice and bring an end to corruption in the country.
Pena Nieto said he had dispatched the federal forces to Iguala to “find out what happened and apply the full extent of the law to those responsible.”The decision to disarm Iguala’s police corps came just days after 28 charred bodies were found in a mass grave on the outskirts of the city.
State prosecutor Inaky Blanco has said the recovered bodies probably belonged to the missing students. State officials also say it will take up to two weeks to receive the results of DNA tests to identify the corpses.
The students, all trainee teachers, went missing following a police attack on September 26 against a protest over teachers’ rights.
According to Blanco, state investigators have obtained video footage showing local police arresting a number of students during the clashes and taking them away.
Prosecutors said the Guerreros Unidos drug gang also participated in the police shooting that left six people dead and 25 others wounded.
Mexican authorities have already arrested 22 officers and issued arrest warrants for Iguala mayor Jose Luis Albarca and his security chief over the deadly incident.
More, HERE.
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Militarization and Political Crisis in Mexico

Is Mexico a Narco-State?

By Michael Werbowski;Global Research, May 31, 2010
Mexico - In the wake of Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s recent state visit to the U.S and Canada, a burning question remains without any clear answer.
2010 is historically significant for Mexico. It is its bi-centennial year of independence ( in 1810 the country began to break free from Spanish imperial tutelage) and perhaps more significantly is is also the centenary year of the 1910 Mexican revolution. There is little to celebrate though. The country this year, is still reeling from the vortex of drug-trafficking crimes, the global economic down-turn and the fall-out from the histrionics and panic induced by the H1N1-Swine flu “pandemic” of 2009.
Mexico after a decade of the centre-right almost “corporatist” PAN ( National Action Party) party’s rule, ( as in 2000, the first PAN candidate won the presidency, Vincente Fox) has been practically “Balkanised”. And as a result, it is now faced with a crippling fragmentation of the federation itself, due mainly to territorial battles or “turf wars” going on between rival drug cartels, which operate almost with impunity in many Mexican states. Possibly, the most fascinating and insightful read on this phenomenal topic is: Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State? . While I was pondering over the question raised by the book’s title , I was somewhat astonished to read in (despite what I witnessed first hand in Mexico) the concluding chapter, a rather reassuring reply. That basically, Mexico is far from becoming another Somalia, Pakistan or Haiti.
More, HERE.
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Destabilizing Mexico

By Rev. Richard Skaff; Global Research, March 13, 2009
Attorney General Eric Holder stated on February 25, 2009 that Mexican drug cartels pose a national security threat, and issued a direct warning to these cartels that they will be destroyed.
The warning came as the attorney general and acting Drug Enforcement Administration chief Michele Leonhart announced the completion of the final phase of DEA’s “Operation Xcellerator,” which targeted the Sinaloa cartel, a major western Mexico drug operation that has been expanding its reach into the United States . [1].
Meanwhile, the blood shed in the Mexican cities continues to be extensive and has expanded its tentacles of violence to various cities in Mexico. Lawlessness, corruption, murders, decapitations, and kidnappings have taken the Mexican cities by a storm, giving rise to a new radical group calling itself the Juarez Citizens Command that is threatening to strike back against lawlessness that has gripped Mexico for a long time. The group stated that they are going to strike back by killing one criminal a day until order and peace is restored. Similar groups are popping up all across Mexico. [2].
In its last report, the US Department of justice disclosed that 17.2 billion dollars in cash entered Mexico in only the past two years as a result of money laundering operation in their country. The report advised that Mexico and Colombia are the principal destinations of narco resources that operate in the US and that “the laundering of drug money is a global industry” with transnational organizations present in various countries. [2].
According to a DEA undercover operative, the Mexican drug cartels have gained more and more of the American market. They have grown bolder in their attempts to expand their operations in Mexico and the United States . They now control the ruling party in Mexico and operate the biggest drug business on earth right here in the USA . [2].
Mexico’s drug and violence problem now engulfs the entire country, inundating cities along the U.S.-Mexico border. The robust drug cartel reduced its position in the western mountains, and lunged into the heart of national power in Mexico City. The capital that was once relatively immune to such contemptuous boldness of drug killings has become the scene of multiple assassinations of high-ranking federal police officials in about a week. More than 1,000 people have been killed in Mexico this year in drug-related violence and about 6,290 in 2008. [11].
More, HERE.
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MORE MEXICO ARTICLES, BY GLOBAL RESEARCH, HERE
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New Evidence Proves Israel Attacked USS Liberty With Orders to Kill 294 Americans

By Aaron Nelson;Global Research, November 14, 2014
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US Government Sanitizes Vietnam War History

By Marjorie Cohn, Global Research, October 30, 2014, Marjoriecohn.com
For many years after the Vietnam War, we enjoyed the “Vietnam syndrome,” in which US presidents hesitated to launch substantial military attacks on other countries. They feared intense opposition akin to the powerful movement that helped bring an end to the war in Vietnam. But in 1991, at the end of the Gulf War, George H.W. Bush declared,
“By God, we’ve kicked the Vietnam syndrome once and for all!”
With George W. Bush’s wars on Iraq and Afghanistan, and Barack Obama’s drone wars in seven Muslim-majority countries and his escalating wars in Iraq and Syria, we have apparently moved beyond the Vietnam syndrome. By planting disinformation in the public realm, the government has built support for its recent wars, as it did with Vietnam.
Now the Pentagon is planning to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War by launching a $30 million program to rewrite and sanitize its history. Replete with a fancy interactive website, the effort is aimed at teaching schoolchildren a revisionist history of the war. The program is focused on honoring our service members who fought in Vietnam. But conspicuously absent from the website is a description of the antiwar movement, at the heart of which was the GI movement.
Thousands of GIs participated in the antiwar movement.

More, HERE.
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Ottawa Lockdown (22 Oct 2014 - TD Photo)
Prime Minister Steven Harper is using the shooting rampage on Parliament Hill as a justification for imposing broad surveillance and detainment measures that were already being implemented.

Copyright © 2005-2014 GlobalResearch.ca

Why America Is to Blame for Mexico's Carnage and Corruption

By John M. Ackerman, November 26, 2014

The crisis over 43 massacred students shows how dysfunctional and corrupt Peña Nieto's government is. And yet Obama keeps patting him on the back.

 

Le Monde

Soupçons sur un autre enlèvement massif au Mexique 6

France 24 affirme qu'une trentaine de lycéens ont été enlevés en juillet à Cocula, village voisin d'Iguala, et sont toujours portés disparus.

Etudiants disparus au Mexique : un leader historique de la gauche démissionne de son parti

Après la disparition de 43 étudiants, les dirigeants politiques du Mexique affrontent une crise historique.

Edito du Monde

Le retour des heures sombres au Mexique

Deux ans après son entrée en fonctions, le président mexicain, Enrique Peña Nieto, est confronté à la plus grave crise de son mandat.
Récit

Polémique sur la somptueuse villa de l’épouse du président mexicain

Les soupçons de conflit d’intérêts se multiplient, et ce alors que le président Peña Nieto affronte la plus grave crise de son mandat après la disparition de 43 étudiants.

Compte rendu

Révolte contre l’« Etat-mafia » au Mexique

Après la disparition de 43 étudiants, le président Peña Nieto affronte la plus grave crise de son mandat.

Mexique : heurts après un défilé pour les étudiants disparus Vidéo

Des heurts se sont produits entre des groupes de manifestants et la police anti-émeute face au Palais national, au centre de Mexico, jeudi.

Des heurts dans le centre de Mexico autour de la disparition des 43 étudiants

Policiers et manifestants se sont opposés devant le Palais national au centre de la capitale, jeudi soir.

Pourquoi le Mexique se révolte-t-il après l'enlèvement de 43 étudiants ? Vidéo

Les manifestations violentes se succèdent au Mexique depuis l'enlèvement de 43 étudiants, le 26 septembre. Comment cette crise est-elle devenue le symbole d'une colère profonde de la population?

Mexique : marche nationale des familles des disparus Vidéo

Les familles veulent dire « non » à la violence.

Plus de Mexique, ICI

© Le Monde.fr

The Wall Street Journal

New Ties by Mexico Builder Roil Nation
Opposition parties called for a probe into a loan and home purchase the Mexican finance minister secured from the same politically connected businessman who built and held the title to a mansion for Mexico’s first lady.

- See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.pt7agj56.dpuf

Mexico Digs Into Ties Between Leader, Builder

Little-Known Government Deals Won by a Contractor Seen Close to President Peña Nieto Emerge, as Opposition Calls for Probes

U.S. Marshals Service Personnel Dressed as Mexican Marines Pursue Cartel Bosses

Members of U.S. Marshals Service Join Military Operations in Mexico Against Drug Gangs

More, HERE.
Copyright ©2014 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

NPR

November 19, 2014

Eyder Peralta

Amid rumblings about conflict of interest and corruption, Mexico's first lady says she will sell a multimillion-dollar home in one of the most glamorous areas of Mexico City.
In a YouTube video released late Tuesday, Angélica Rivera defiantly proclaims that she has "nothing to hide."
"I have worked all my life, and because of that I am an independent woman capable of building a patrimony with honesty," she said.
Rivera and her husband, President Enrique Peña Nieto, have been under heavy scrutiny lately: first, because of the way the government has handled the case of 43 students who went missing after they were detained by police, and then after Aristegui Noticias revealed that an opulent modern structure dubbed "The White House" and valued at $7 million was owned by a construction company awarded millions in government contracts.
As Aristegui explained, the house, which Rivera showed off in a glitzy spread in the royal-centric magazine ¡Hola!, was just another symbol of the "close relationship between Peña Nieto and Grupo Higa."
According to the investigation, Grupo Higa is owned by Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantú, who in the past rented out airplanes for the Peña Nieto's 2012 presidential campaign. The company, Aristegui reports, received millions of dollars in contracts in the state of Mexico when Peña Nieto was governor.
Once Peña Nieto was in the presidential palace, a subsidiary of Hinojosa's company was awarded part of a huge contract to build a high-speed train from Mexico City to Querétaro.
Just days before the report was published, Peña Nieto canceled the $3.7 billion contract.
More, HERE.

© 2014 NPR

Al Jazeera America

VIDEO: Mexico's Nieto faces growing calls to resign

02 Dec 2014

President's second anniversary in office marred by protests as he and the government are accused of corruption.

With help from the Obama administration, Peña Nieto is brutally reshaping Mexican society

Through the story of one immigrant family, we explore the evolution of racism and migration in the US.

President Pena Nieto proposes changes to police force following uproar over presumed massacre of 43 students.
Ferguson: Lawmakers urge calm, offer few policy prescriptions

Analysis: Think riots have never caused change in America? Think again

Brown's parents vow to 'keep fighting' for justice

Protesters upset by Ferguson decision storm St. Louis City Hall

Confronting race and inequality in the US
Week before verdict, 12 killed by US law enforcement
Please click on HERE to get updated Al Jazeera, Mexico news

Drug trafficking organizations are rapidly splintering, but there€’s no end in sight to the violence

Topics:

Mexico

Drugs

Drug Cartels
The village warriors of Guerrero

Cocaine, heroin and avocados

Thousands march in Mexico over students
Tens of thousands of people angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students are marching in Mexico City as part of another day of nationwide protests.
Protesters on Thursday waved blackened flags of Mexico and many chanted for the resignation of President Enrique Pena Nieto. "He will fall, he will fall, Pena Nieto will fall," they chanted.
Some protesters clashed with riot police near the city's international airport at the start of the day's demonstrations, burning tyres, throwing firebombs and launching firecrackers at police.
Thursday’s protest was the latest protest over the government's handling of a crime that has infuriated Mexicans fed up with corruption, impunity and a drug war that has left more than 100,000 people dead or missing since 2006.
The case has turned into the biggest challenge of Pena Nieto's nearly two-year-old presidency, on top of another scandal over a mansion his wife bought from a government contractor.
'Mexico is hurting'
The crisis erupted after the mayor of the city of Iguala allegedly ordered police to confront students on September 26, sparking a night of violence that left six people dead and 43 missing, authorities say.
Protesters angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students take to the streets for another day of demonstrations.

More, HERE.

Police officer fires on Mexico City students, inflaming tensions

Students had been planning for a Nov. 20 national strike in solidarity with 43 missing students from Guerrero

INSIDE STORY

VIDEO: Missing Mexico students: Who is responsible.

Protesters demand justice for missing 43 trainee teachers who are feared murdered in Mexico. To watch video click on HERE.
Mexico president pushes trade ties in China while protests rage at home

Peña Nieto's Beijing trip amid massive political crisis at home shows heavy bet on China ties as economic boost

Mexico missing student protesters burn state buildings

Protest movement has hit Guerrero'€™s tourism industry with vacationers canceling trips during busiest time of year.

Photos: In Acapulco, an angry demonstration over missing students

Students, peasants and others attempt to block the airport and clash with police.

Mexico leader travels to Asia amid rising unrest over missing students

Peña Nieto faces increased calls to resign as another presidential scandal emerged over the weekend

Mexico protesters set fire to National Palace over missing students

Gang members have confessed to killing the 43 missing students and dumping their charred remains in a landfill.

Gang members confess to mass killing of Mexico students

Charred human remains found in a dumpster are likely the students who disappeared on Sept. 26, Mexican authorities say.

Mexican army accepts criticism of human rights commission in killings

The defense department says, however, it doesn't agree with all findings of human rights commission on the June slayings.

Why have the most recent kidnappings in Mexico sparked such outrage?

The disappearance of 43 students in Mexico has triggered nationwide demonstrations for government accountability.

Thousands protest missing Mexico students despite mayor arrest

Public anger over student disappearances brings Mexico City to a standstill; full-blown crisis for President Peña Nieto.

Photos: Protests over 43 Guerrero students target government buildings

A city congress and buildings tied to the ruling party are trashed and burned.

The food producer has developed more than 480 varieties of wheat, upping production by an estimated 200 million tonnes.
Mexican official: CIA 'manages' drug trade

Spokesman for Chihuahua state says US agencies don't want to end drug trade, a claim denied by other Mexican officials

24 Jul 2012, by Chris Arsenault

Juarez, Mexico - The US Central Intelligence Agency and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers", a spokesman for the Chihuahua state government in northern Mexico has told Al Jazeera, instead "they try to manage the drug trade".
Allegations about official complicity in the drug business are nothing new when they come from activists, professors, campaigners or even former officials. However, an official spokesman for the authorities in one of Mexico's most violent states - one which directly borders Texas - going on the record with such accusations is unique.

"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva, the Chihuahua spokesman, told Al Jazeera last month at his office in Juarez. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."

Accusations are 'baloney'
Villanueva is not a high ranking official and his views do not represent Mexico's foreign policy establishment. Other more senior officials in Chihuahua State, including the mayor of Juarez, dismissed the claims as "baloney".
"I think the CIA and DEA [US Drug Enforcement Agency] are on the same side as us in fighting drug gangs," Hector Murguia, the mayor of Juarez, told Al Jazeera during an interview inside his SUV. "We have excellent collaboration with the US."
Under the Merida Initiative, the US Congress has approved more than $1.4bn in drug war aid for Mexico, providing attack helicopters, weapons and training for police and judges.
More than 55,000 people have died in drug related violence in Mexico since December 2006. Privately, residents and officials across Mexico's political spectrum often blame the lethal cocktail of US drug consumption and the flow of high-powered weapons smuggled south of the border for causing much of the carnage.
"The war on drugs is an illusion," Hugo Almada Mireles, professor at the Autonomous University of Juarez and author of several books, told Al Jazeera. "It's a reason to intervene in Latin America."
"The CIA wants to control the population; they don't want to stop arms trafficking to Mexico, look at [Operation] Fast and Furious,” he said, referencing a botched US exercise where automatic weapons were sold to criminals in the hope that security forces could trace where the guns ended up.
The Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms lost track of 1,700 guns as part of the operation, including an AK-47 used in 2010 the murder of Brian Terry, a Customs and Border Protection Agent.
More, HERE.
© 2014 Al Jazeera America, LLC. All rights reserved.

InSight Crime

InSight Crime is a foundation dedicated to the study of the principal threat to national and citizen security in Latin America and the Caribbean: organized crime. We seek to deepen and inform the debate about organized crime in the Americas by providing the general public with regular reporting, analysis and investigation on the subject and on state efforts to combat it. More about Insight Crime HERE.

Iguala Massacre: Mexico's PR Message Goes Up in Flames

The stunning, dramatic blow-by-blow account of what most likely happened to the 43 missing students in Guerrero is an indication of just how desperately Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto and his team are trying to perform damage control on a terrifying story -- one that has not only unsettled his government, but has pushed them to admit that things are not as their public relations machine would have you believe.
In the hour-long November 7 press conference (see video below), Attorney General Jose Murillo Karam announced that the recent capture of alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos led to confessions that the students were taken by police while en route to the town of Iguala. The police handed the students over to the Guerreros Unidos, who then killed them and burned their remains.
Specifically, video testimonies from three recently captured “masterminds” of the attacks revealed that the students were carted like cattle to a landfill in Cocula. According to one suspect, approximately 15 students asphyxiated on the way to the dump site. The remaining students were interrogated by members of the Guerreros Unidos before being shot and killed. The bodies were then thrown into the landfill, arranged in a circle, covered in sticks, gasoline, and diesel, and burned. The fire reportedly lasted for 14 hours, from midnight on September 27, until mid-afternoon.
According to the testimonies, a leader of the criminal group known as “El Terco” ordered the burned human remains to be collected and placed into eight black plastic bags. Members of the Guerreros Unidos then took the bags to the San Juan River in Cocula, where they dumped the contents into the water, while two bags were thrown directly into the river.
Following the confessions, search teams found black bags, one of which was still closed. Mexican and Argentine forensic teams reportedly confirmed the bag contained human remains. However, due to the degree to which the bodies were burned, forensic experts have not yet determined when the remains will be able to be identified.

More, HERE.

Business Insider

Tens Of Thousands Of Mexicans Protest In The Streets Over 43 Missing Students

Carola Sole, AFP

Oct. 9, 2014
Mexico City (AFP) - Tens of thousands of people held protests in Mexico, joining tearful families of 43 missing students demanding their return amid fears a police-backed gang executed them.
Crowds on Wednesday gathered from Mexico City to the violence-wracked state of Guerrero, where the students disappeared, and as far south as Chiapas.
Parents of the victims traveled from Guerrero to head a march of thousands of people in Mexico City, tearfully holding up pictures of their sons, and signs reading "we want them back alive."
More, HERE.
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Mexican Official Accuses CIA Of 'Managing' Not 'Fighting' The Drug Trade

Jul. 24, 2012, by
A Mexican state government spokesman told Al Jazeera that the CIA and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers" as much as "try to manage the drug trade," Chris Arsenault reports.
"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Chihuahua spokesman Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva told Al Jazeera. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."
More, HERE.
Copyright © 2014 Business Insider Inc. All rights reserved.

Infowars.com

Former CIA Officer Says ISIS and Mexican Drug Cartels Communicate

U.S. Gov. and CIA connected to drugs and terror

By Kurt Nimmo | Infowars.com | August 21, 2014

A former CIA officer, now a security consultant who regularly appears on Fox News, told the Laura Ingraham Show Thursday ISIS and Mexican drug cartels communicate with each other.
“We’ve had good intel over the years about al-Qaeda, about their efforts to coordinate with, as an example, Mexican cartels… in an effort to try to exploit our southern border,” Mike Baker told Ingraham.
The one-time CIA employee said there is “a lot of communication” between ISIS and drug cartels and “the cartels are a business… if there’s a revenue stream they can exploit, then they will, and the extremists understand that.”
It is not clear if this intel was passed on to Baker by his former colleagues.
In 2012 a spokesman for the Chihuahua state in Mexico, Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva told Aljazerra the CIA and other intelligence agencies manage the drug trade in Mexico.
More, HERE.

Contact:512-291-5750512-291-5750 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Infowars, P.O. Box 19549, Austin, TX 78760

The Daily Beast

Anatomy of a Mexican Student Massacre

10.08.14, by Jason McGahan

For almost a century a teacher’s college in rural Mexico has been training educators and activists. Last month, dozens were abducted and slaughtered—by the police.
MEXICO CITY — Twelve days ago, police and unidentified gunmen believed to be members of a drug cartel ambushed a caravan of college student activists in the state of Guerrero, about half way from Mexico City to Acapulco.
Near the central plaza in the town of Iguala, a total of six persons were shot to death. Three were student activists from the Raúl Isidro Burgos Rural Teachers College of Ayotzinapa. Three additional shooting victims were a semiprofessional soccer player riding in one of the three buses, a taxi driver, and his female passenger. But most likely they were unintended victims caught in the line of fire. There’s no question the students were the target.
One who survived the first fusillade, a 19-year-old named Julio César Mondragón, panicked and, over the objections of classmates who said they should stay together, ran away on his own. He was later found dead and horribly disfigured; a photo of his corpse has gone viral in Mexico: it shows the face stripped away to the bare skull underneath.
Survivors of the incident report that the police and thugs attacked the students three times. They sprayed one of the buses with machine gun fire. One eyewitness reported seeing the police force students out of another bus at gunpoint. In addition to the three students killed, 17 student activists were wounded. But they may have been the lucky ones. As many as 44 others were abducted. Some reports say they were taken away in police vehicles. None of them have been seen since September 26.
The precise motives for the killings are difficult to determine, but the students come from a school that has been training rural teachers—and activists—for the better part of a century. Their commitment to helping small farmers and farm workers in the rugged, semi-feudal countryside often has put them at odds with the local powers that be. And when you add to that the cozy relationship that exists today between some of those powers and narcotics traffickers, the situation is explosive.
More, HERE.
© 2014 The Daily Beast Company LLC

The New American

U.S. Government and Top Mexican Drug Cartel Exposed as Partners

14 January 2014, by 

For over a decade, under multiple administrations, the U.S. government had a secret agreement with the ruthless Mexican Sinaloa drug cartel that allowed it to operate with impunity, an in-depth investigation by a leading Mexican newspaper confirmed this week. In exchange for information and assistance in quashing competing criminal syndicates, the Bush and Obama administrations let the Sinaloa cartel import tons of drugs into the United States while wiping out Sinaloa competitors and ensuring that its leaders would not be prosecuted for their long list of major crimes. Other revelations also point strongly to massive but clandestine U.S. government involvement in drug trafficking.
Relying on over 100 interviews with current and former government functionaries on both sides of the border, as well as official documents from the U.S. and Mexican governments, Mexico’s El Universal concluded that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and the U.S. Justice Department had secretly worked with Mexican drug lords. The controversial conspiring led to increased violence across Mexico, where many tens of thousands have been murdered in recent years, the newspaper found after its year-long probe. The U.S. agents and their shady deals with Mexican drug lords even sparked what the paper called a “secret war” inside Mexico.
The newspaper’s investigation also confirmed long-held suspicions that U.S. authorities were signing secret agreements with Mexican drug cartels — especially Sinaloa, which CIA operatives have said was a favorite for use in achieving geo-political objectives. Supposedly without the knowledge or approval of officials in Mexico, ICE and DEA, with a green light from Washington, D.C., made deals with criminal bosses allowing them to avoid prosecution for a vast crime spree that has included mass murder, corruption, bribery, drug trafficking, extortion, and more. In exchange, cartel leaders simply had to help U.S. officials eliminate their competitors — certainly a win-win scenario for crime bosses who prefer to operate without competition or fear of prosecution.
More, HERE.
Alex Newman, a foreign correspondent for The New American, is normally based in Europe after growing up in Latin America, including seven years in Mexico. He can be reached at   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Related articles:
CIA “Manages” Drug Trade, Mexican Official Says
Reports: CIA Working with Mexican Drug Cartels
Trafficker: U.S. Feds Aided Mexican Drug Cartel
Mexican Drug Trafficker Says He Worked With Feds
Stratfor Sources: U.S. Troops in Mexico as Feds Aid Cartels
Congress Probes DEA Drug Money Laundering Scheme
Feds Let Mexican Cartel Hit Men Kill in U.S., Senior Lawman Told Stratfor
Fast and Furious: FBI Now Linked to Murder of U.S. Border Agent
U.S. Judge: Obama Homeland Security Aiding Criminal Conspiracies
Impeachment Support Soars as Voters Say Feds “Out of Control”
Copyright © 2014 The New American

GlobalPost – International News

Mexico accepts student demands in bid to avert spread of protests

Agencia EFE; October 4, 2014

Mexico City, Oct 4 (EFE).- Mexico's government has accepted all the demands of student protesters at the National Polytechnic Institute, or IPN, a public university in this capital, in a bid to prevent the movement from spreading to other higher education institutions.

On Sept. 22, students at the IPN's Superior School of Engineering and Architecture halted activities to protest new internal regulations that they said lowered the institution's academic and professional level.

More, HERE.

Copyright EFE, 2014.

Home

US Military’s Training of Mexican Security Forces Continues As Human-Rights Abuses Mount In Mexico

Posted by Bill Conroy - December 3, 2014

DoD Officials Claim Training is Part of the Solution, Not the Problem
The U.S. government has spent more than $62 million since fiscal year 2010 providing highly specialized training to Mexican security forces, including some $16.3 million in fiscal 2013, as part of an effort to help Mexico better prosecute its war on drugs, records made public under the U.S. Foreign Assistance Act show.

Local Opposition to Washington’s Legal Marijuana Businesses Is a Taxing Issue For the Fledgling Industry

Posted by Bill Conroy - November 14, 2014
Effort to Overcome City Moratoriums on Cannabis Shops Could Spark an Unlikely Alliance
The great experiment in the state of Washington to legalize the sale of marijuana through a regulated and taxed market has hit a hitch at the local level that threatens to slow progress to a snail’s pace, even as more and more marijuana businesses obtain the state licensing needed to open their doors.
Through early November, Washington’s cannabis market, state records show, included some 63 retailers, 239 producers and 197 processors — all issued the required state-level licenses to begin doing business in the state. But the battle ahead for many of them — and others in the pipeline — to actually open their doors for business is far from over.

More, HERE.
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Labor Unions Are Supporting Washington State Legal Marijuana Dispensaries that Create "More Workers to Organize"

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 22, 2014
The United Food and Commercial Workers and other Unions Seek to Strengthen Protections for Cannabis Workers
What’s going on in the state of Washington and beyond with the movement to legalize marijuana is, only in part, about business, taxes and government oversight — all to be amplified by the billions of dollars annually this new industry promises to throw off.

More, HERE.
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Community Police in Guerrero’s Costa Chica Region to Celebrate 19 Years of a Better Way to Combat Crime and Corruption

The Same Southern Mexican State Where 43 Students Were Disappeared Is also Home to a Grassroots Movement that Shows How People Can Police Themselves When the State Becomes Criminal.

By Greg Berger and Oscar Olivera

Special for The Narco News Bulletin

November 7, 2014

Publisher’s Note: In Mexico and throughout the world the state of Guerrero has become a vivid example of the horrors of the “war on drugs” and the pervasive corruption and violence it invites from all levels of government. On September 26, Mayor Jose Luis Abarca of the city of Iguala ordered police to detain a group of students from the local Ayotzinapa teachers’ college. The mayor’s ties to organized crime have been widely documented. It is believed that the mayor thought the students were planning to stage a protest at a public event held by his wife. Police then killed six students, and 43 more were disappeared. The police reportedly turned the 43 youths over to a local criminal gang. Multiple mass graves have been dug up in the area, each at first rumored to contain the bodies of the students, then have been revealed to be the tombs of previous nameless casualties of the US-imposed drug war.
The whereabouts of the missing students are still unknown.
More, HERE.
-------------------

Millions Missing From DEA Money-Laundering Operation

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 6, 2014

But No One With the Power to Investigate Seems to Care
At least $20 million went missing from money seizures by law enforcers, critical evidence was destroyed by a federal agency, a key informant was outed by a US prosecutor — contributing to her being kidnapped and nearly killed — and at the end of the day not a single narco-trafficker was prosecuted in this four-year-long DEA undercover operation gone awry.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Charles Bowden has died, but his voice is louder than ever

Posted by Bill Conroy - September 2, 2014

As one of the original authentic journalists, he trailblazed a path for others to follow
When I heard that he had passed, my eyes welled with tears. I’m of stoic Irish stock, so I don’t shed tears easily, but the news of Charles Bowden’s death (1945-2014) was not an easy thing to bear. He had been a mentor and a friend to me for a decade, and his leaving hurts.
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Official US Cover-Up Still Obscures Motive for Juarez Consulate Murders

Posted by Bill Conroy - May 7, 2014
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U.S. Military: More Counter-Narcotics Funding Will Help Stem Exodus of Children from Central America

By Bill Conroy - July 29, 2014

 

Critics Argue Drug-War Money is Part of the Problem, Not the Solution.

 

Some 58,000 migrant children, mostly Central Americans, have made the treacherous journey to the U.S. southern border alone over the past 10 months, but actions being considered by U.S. officials to combat the problem with more military and drug-war aid to their countries, critics warn, may worsen the violence that provokes this unprecedented exodus.

The number of unaccompanied children that have arrived at the U.S. border so far this fiscal year is up 106 percent from the same period a year earlier — with the total expected to reach 90,000 before Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year.


To put that latter number in perspective, it is nearly five times larger than the number of Border Patrol agents now stationed along the entire southern border.

More, HERE.
-----------------

MORE NARCO NEWS, HERE

25 Deadliest Mass Shootings in U.S. History Fast Facts

By CNN Library; September 2, 2014
(CNN) -- Here is a list of the 25 deadliest single day mass shootings in U.S. history from 1949 to the present. If the shooter was killed or committed suicide during the incident that death is not included in the total.

Timeline:

32 killed - April 16, 2007 - Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. A gunman, 23-year-old student Seung-Hui Cho, goes on a shooting spree killing 32 people in two locations and wounds an undetermined number of others on campus. The shooter, Seung-Hui Cho then committed suicide.

27 killed - December 14, 2012 - Sandy Hook Elementary School - Newtown, Connecticut. Adam Lanza, 20, guns down 20 children, ages 6 and 7, and six adults, school staff and faculty, before turning the gun on himself. Investigating police later find Nancy Lanza, Adam's mother, dead from a gunshot wound. The final count is 28 dead, including the shooter.

23 killed - October 16, 1991 - In Killeen, Texas, 35-year-old George Hennard crashes his pickup truck through the wall of a Lubys Cafeteria. After exiting the truck, Hennard shoots and kills 23 people. He then commits suicide.

21 killed - July 18, 1984 - In San Ysidro, California, 41-year-old James Huberty, armed with a long-barreled Uzi, a pump-action shotgun and a handgun shoots and kills 21 adults and children at a local McDonalds. A police sharpshooter kills Huberty one hour after the rampage begins.

18 killed - August 1, 1966 - In Austin, Texas, Charles Joseph Whitman, a former U.S. Marine, kills 16 and wounds at least 30 while shooting from a University of Texas tower. Police officers Ramiro Martinez and Houston McCoy shot and killed Whitman in the tower. Whitman had also killed his mother and wife earlier in the day.

14 killed - August 20, 1986 - Edmond, Oklahoma part-time mail carrier, Patrick Henry Sherrill, armed with three handguns kills 14 postal workers in ten minutes and then takes his own life with a bullet to the head.

13 killed - November 5, 2009 - Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan kills 13 people and injures 32 at Fort Hood, Texas, during a shooting rampage. He is convicted and sentenced to death.

13 killed - April 3, 2009 - In Binghamton, New York, Jiverly Wong kills 13 people and injures four during a shooting at an immigrant community center. He then kills himself.

13 killed - April 20, 1999 - Columbine High School - Littleton, Colorado. 18-year-old Eric Harris and

17-year-old Dylan Klebold kill 12 fellow students and one teacher before committing suicide in the school library.

13 killed - September 25, 1982 - In Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 40-year-old George Banks, a prison guard, kills 13 people including five of his own children. In September 2011, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturns his death sentence stating that Banks is mentally incompetent.

13 killed - September 5, 1949 - In Camden, New Jersey, 28-year-old Howard Unruh, a veteran of World War II, shoots and kills 13 people as he walks down Camden's 32nd Street. His weapon of choice is a German-crafted Luger pistol. He is found insane and is committed to a state mental institution. He dies at the age of 88.

12 killed - September 16, 2013 - Shots are fired inside the Washington Navy Yard killing 12. The shooter, identified as Aaron Alexis, 34, is also killed.

12 killed - July 20, 2012 - Twelve people are killed and 58 are wounded in a shooting at an Aurora, Colorado, movie theater screening of the new Batman film. James E. Holmes, 24, is taken into custody outside of the movie theater. The gunman is dressed head-to-toe in protective tactical gear, set off two devices of some kind before spraying the theater with bullets from an AR-15 rifle, a 12-gauge shotgun and at least one of two .40-caliber handguns police recovered at the scene.

12 killed - July 29, 1999 - In Atlanta, 44-year-old Mark Barton kills his wife and two children at his home. He then opens fire in two different brokerage houses killing nine people and wounding 12. He later kills himself.

10 killed - March 10, 2009 - In Alabama, Michael McLendon of Kinston, kills 10 and himself. The dead include his mother, grandparents, aunt and uncle.

9 killed - March 21, 2005 - Red Lake High School, Red Lake, Minnesota. 16-year-old Jeff Weise kills his grandfather and another adult, five students, a teacher and a security officer. He then kills himself.

9 killed - June 18, 1990 - In Jacksonville, Florida, 42-year-old James Pough, angry about his car being repossessed, opens fire at at a General Motors Acceptance Corp. office, killing nine people. Pough takes his own life.

8 killed - October 12, 2011 - Eight people are killed during a shooting at the Salon Meritage in Seal Beach, California. The suspect, Scott Evans Dekraai, 41, of Huntington Beach, is arrested without incident as he is trying to leave the scene. The eight dead include Dekraai's ex-wife, Michelle Fournier, 48. He was armed with three guns -- a 9 mm Springfield, a Smith & Wesson .44 Magnum, and a Heckler & Koch .45 -- and was wearing body armor during the shooting rampage.

8 killed - August 3, 2010 - Manchester, Connecticut - Omar Thornton kills eight co-workers at Hartford Distributors before turning the gun on himself. Thornton had been asked to resign for stealing and selling alcoholic beverages.

8 killed - January 19, 2010 - Christopher Speight, 39, kills eight people at a house in Appomattox, Virginia. He surrenders to police at the scene the next morning, and is charged with one count of murder with additional charges pending.

8 killed - March 29, 2009 - In Carthage, North Carolina, 45-year-old Robert Stewart kills a nurse and seven elderly patients at a nursing home. In May, the Moore County district attorney announces she will seek the death penalty. On September 3, 2011, a jury finds Stewart guilty of second-degree murder. Stewart is sentenced to 141 to 179 years in prison.

8 killed - December 5, 2007 - In Omaha, Nebraska, 19-year-old Robert Hawkins goes to an area mall and kills eight shoppers before killing himself.

8 killed - July 1, 1993 - In San Francisco, 55-year-old Gian Luigi Ferri kills eight people in a law office and then kills himself.

8 killed - September 14, 1989 - In Louisville, Kentucky, 47-year-old Joseph Wesbecker armed with a AK-47 semiautomatic assault rifle, two MAC-11 semiautomatic pistols, a .38 caliber handgun, a 9-millimeter semiautomatic pistol and a bayonet kills eight co-workers at Standard Gravure Corporation and then kills himself. He had been placed on disability leave from his job due to mental problems.

8 killed - August 20, 1982 - In Miami, 51-year-old history teacher Carl Robert Brown, angry about a repair bill and armed with a shotgun, kills eight people at a machine shop. He flees by bicycle, but is shot in the back by a witness who pursued him. He was on leave from school for psychological treatment.

List of rampage killers (school massacres), by Wikipedia

List of school shootings in the United States, by Wikipedia

Starting with Pontiac's Rebellion school massacre on July 26, 1764 to August 6, 2014in River Woods Elementary when an 11-year-old student at RWES in Des Moines, Iowa, brought a BB gun to the school accompanied by two former students aged 11 & 16. The student admitted to having the weapon and making threats against 4 students. Police recovered the gun and arrested the alleged students
More, HERE.

America's Wars: U.S. Casualties and Veterans

The table below has information about the total number of service members, battle deaths, and nonmortal woundings in wars from 1775 to 2012; such as the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War I and II, Vietnam, and more
Information Please® Database, © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

67% of all homicides in the U.S. were conducted using a firearm: UN

According to the FBI, in 2012, there were 8,855 total firearm-related homicides in the US, with 6,371 of those attributed to handguns. 61% of all gun-related deaths in the U.S. are suicides. More, HERE by Wikipedia.

Crime in the United States

Crime in the United States has been present since colonization
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

© 2014 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Scandal in Mexico: A murky mortgage

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa Was a Crime of the State - See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Questions surround the purchase of a house owned by the finance minister

Dec 12th 2014

Mexico’s growing crisis: Reforms and democracy, but no rule of law

Nov 13th 2014

To save a promising presidency, Enrique Peña Nieto must tackle crime and corruption

From the print edition
DURING two years in office Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has received sharply contrasting reviews at home and abroad. Foreigners, including The Economist, have praised his structural reforms of the economy, which include an historic measure to open up energy to private investment (see article). Yet polls show that most Mexicans dislike Mr Peña. Among other things, they blame his government for a squeeze on living standards and the interlinked problems of violent crime and corruption. Sadly, recent events have lent support to Mr Peña’s domestic critics.
On November 8th Mexico’s attorney-general announced what almost everyone had already concluded: that 43 students from a teacher-training college in the southern state of Guerrero, who disappeared in the town of Iguala in late September, had been murdered by drug-traffickers after being kidnapped by the local police on the orders of the town’s mayor. Guerrero has been Mexico’s most violent state for centuries. The federal government bears no direct responsibility for these events. But Mexicans see in them a symbol of the failure of Mr Peña’s administration to make security a priority.
Now comes a problem that is uncomfortably close to home. The government had already opted to cancel a contract for a high-speed train that it had hastily awarded to the sole bidder, a consortium of Chinese and Mexican companies including a construction firm from the president’s home state. A local journalist has revealed that the boss of the same firm owns a $7m mansion that is the Peña family’s private residence (see article). The president denies any wrongdoing, but a common thread runs through these events.
Mexico only became a democracy in 2000, when seven decades of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the political machine that raised Mr Peña, were ended by electoral defeat. Unfortunately, democracy did not bring the rule of law to Mexico. Too many in the PRI still see the job of the police and the courts as enforcing political control, rather than investigating mobsters. Corrupt politicians are protected rather than punished. Organised crime and graft both remain a part of everyday life, and neither has been helped by the drugs flowing north to the United States.
More, HERE.
------------------

Victims of Mexico’s drug war

Tracing the missing

Many thousands disappeared in Mexico’s drug war. The government should do more to find them

Mexico’s economy

Jam mañana

A frustrating start to the year

May 24th 2014 | MEXICO CITY | From the print edition

SO FAR this year Mexico’s government has resembled one of the country’s many devotees of St Jude, patron saint of lost causes. It has doggedly stuck to a 3.9% 2014 growth forecast, even though its main export market, the United States, has been sluggish, and the twin pillars of its domestic economy—buying and building—have fared even worse.

On May 21st the central bank revised its growth prediction down to 2.3-3.3%, from 3-4% previously. The government was expected finally to follow suit on May 23rd, when first-quarter GDP figures were due to be released. Even so, officials are convinced that within months the benefits of its plans to modernise the economy will start to show up in the numbers.

Mexicans have good reason to be sceptical.

More, HERE.

Copyright © The Economist Newspaper Limited 2013. All rights reserved.

The Guardian

 

Snowden voted person of the year


Edward Snowden
In May Edward Snowden flew to Hong Kong where he gave journalists the material which blew the lid on the extent of US digital spying. Photograph: The Guardian/AFP/Getty Images

For the second year in a row, a young American whistleblower alarmed at the unfettered and at times cynical deployment of power by the world's foremost superpower has been voted the Guardian's person of the year.

Edward Snowden, who leaked an estimated 200,000 files that exposed the extensive and intrusive nature of phone and internet surveillance and intelligence gathering by the US and its western allies, was the overwhelming choice of more than 2,000 people who voted.

The NSA whistleblower garnered 1,445 votes. In a distant second, from a list of 10 candidates chosen by Guardian writers and editors, came Marco Weber and Sini Saarela, the Greenpeace activists who spearheaded the oil rig protest over Russian Arctic drilling. They received 314 votes. Pope Francis gained 153 votes, narrowly ahead of blogger and anti-poverty campaigner Jack Monroe, who received 144.
Snowden's victory was as decisive as Chelsea Manning's a year earlier.

More, HERE.

© 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.

latimes.com

Click on HERE to get the latest Los Angeles Times News

3 dead, many injured after car rams crowd leaving Christmas concert

Three are killed and numerous others are injured when a suspected intoxicated driver plows into a crowd leaving a Christmas concert in Redondo Beach.

U.S. sues N.Y. City over treatment of young Rikers Island inmates

Nearing death, two people offer life lessons

Francine Orr

It's more than a year now since Evelyn and my father died. Some days I feel completely broken. Other days I feel like the weight of grief is lifting.

U.S.-Cuba thaw could erode Russia's influence

Carol J. Williams

If a reconciliation bolsters trade and economic collaboration across the Florida Strait, the political symbiosis between Havana and Moscow could wither.

Tears of joy, cries of 'traitor': Miami reacts to Obama's Cuba move

Ford expands Takata air bag recall to more than 500,000 cars

Napa quake's 'afterslip' could continue to cause damage

In Hong Kong, trams offer a ride like no others

Pakistan court grants bail to accused mastermind of Mumbai attacks

Detectives crack $10-million L.A. art heist; recover 9 paintings

Experts on North Korea see regime's fingerprints on Sony attack

Copyright 2014

MICHAEL MOORE

 

You Tube

Nixon before resignation and full speech, August 8, 1974

Protests in response to Israel’s assault on Gaza have drawn hundreds — and in some cases thousands — around the world.

 

Megyn Kelly To Dick Cheney: 'History Has Proven' You Were Wrong on Iraq Dick Cheney Kelly File.

 

You Tube

'Citizen Koch' ... the movie they didn't want you to see

Meet Governor(s) Pay-to Pay

 

Charles Baker, GOP nominee for governor in Massachusetts, gave $10,000 to New Jersey's Republican State Committee and hosted a fundraiser for Chris Christie – which happens to be flagrantly illegal, since Baker worked for a venture capital firm that shortly thereafter got a contract to manage New Jersey public pension funds

SPIEGEL ONLINE

Inside TAO: Documents Reveal Top NSA Hacking Unit

By SPIEGEL Staff

 

The article you are reading originally appeared in German in issue 1/2014 (December 30, 2013) of DER SPIEGEL.

 

Targeting Mexico

 

Mexico's Secretariat of Public Security, which was folded into the new National Security Commission at the beginning of 2013, was responsible at the time for the country's police, counterterrorism, prison system and border police. Most of the agency's nearly 20,000 employees worked at its headquarters on Avenida Constituyentes, an important traffic artery in Mexico City. A large share of the Mexican security authorities under the auspices of the Secretariat are supervised from the offices there, making Avenida Constituyentes a one-stop shop for anyone seeking to learn more about the country's security apparatus.

 

More, HERE.

Fresh Leak on US Spying: NSA Accessed Mexican President's Email

By Jens Glüsing, Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

'Royal Concierge': GCHQ Monitors Diplomats' Hotel Bookings

By Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

Quantum Spying: GCHQ Used Fake LinkedIn Pages to Target Engineers

Oil Espionage: How the NSA and GCHQ Spied on OPEC

Belgacom Attack: Britain's GCHQ Hacked Belgian Telecoms Firm

Cyber Attack: Belgians Angered by British Spying

By Gregor Peter Schmitz in Brussels

 

© SPIEGEL ONLINE 2013, All Rights Reserved

Fox News

US intelligence assets in Mexico reportedly tied to murdered DEA agent

SCM's Travel Advisory:


September 11 attacks on World Trade Center by Wikipedia

 

Mexicans are advised to exercise MAXIMUM CAUTION, monitor developments that might affect your safety in the United States because of Hate Crimes. The FBI reports that hate crimes against Latinos rose almost 40 percent between 2003 and 2006, and Hispanic activists say they are being targeted with threats and intimidation.

This is just a recent incident: STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- A rash of recent assaults on Mexican immigrants has heightened tensions in Port Richmond, already on edge following the savage beating of a 25-year-old baker earlier this (April 2010) month.

 

In addition, no matter what your nationality the US in under permanent risk of terrorism. Visitors could be caught up in attacks targeted at American, British, Canadian, Australian citizens, others. Terrorists may attack official or civilian targets. Crime rates are higher in the larger cities, such as New York, Los Angeles and Chicago.

 

Many parts of the United States are subject to different natural hazards, including earthquakes, fires or wildfires, floods, extreme heat, hurricanes, landslides and debris flow (mudslides), thunderstorms and lightning, tornadoes, tsunamis, volcanoes (Hawaii, Alaska and Pacific Northwest), winter storms (freezing rain, heavy snow and blizzards) and extreme cold.

 

Tourists are often targeted for petty crimes such as pick-pocketing and theft, particularly on public transport. It is recommended that before visiting your destination point, Google it and write NAME OF CITY TO BE VISITED, then "crime, areas to be avoided & gang activities" to determine your level of threat.  

Come Back Alive, a site dedicated to Dangerous Countries writes on quote: 

"There are more than 200 million guns in the possession of Americans. Most violent acts in the States are the result of robberies, domestic disputes and drug-related violence.

 

Terrorist acts, ranging from the killing of abortionist doctors to the bombing of the World Trade Center, are highly publicized but not considered a real threat to travelers. The threat of robbery or violent crime in inner cities and some tourist areas is real and should be taken seriously. Travel in America is considered safe (by .. Americans), and danger is confined to random violence and inner cities.

 

Those seeking adventure can find it in a New Orleans bar at five in the morning or strolling through South Central L.A. after midnight." .. 

TRAVEL ADVISORY: The Southern Poverty Law Center counted 932 active hate groups in the United States in 2009. Only organizations and their chapters known to be active during 2009 are included. More, HERE.

Oct. 29, 2009 Washington Post: Obama signs hate crimes law

You Tube

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HATE CRIMES

RACISM AND ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION, by ABC News

MEXICAN HATE RALLY

The New Sport: Latino Hate Crime, ABC News

Mexican beaten by 3 racist Blacks on Staten Island, New York

US Border Patrol Agent Shoots Dead Mexican Teen on Mexican Soil

Border agent details immigrant abuse

Discrimination Against Latinos

American Heritage- KKK Lynching

 

Redneck Attacks Mexican flag

 

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TERRORISM, DRUGS

New report exposes CIA torture & rendition by Nick Harper

MUST-READ Book: Cocaine Politics by Peter Dale Scott

Drugs and the Economy - Peter Dale Scott

Gary Webb on C.I.A. Trafficking of Cocaine

CIA Torture Jet crashed with 4 Tons of COCAINE

Former LA Police Officer Mike Ruppert Confronts CIA Director

'I don't think drug trafficking will ever be stopped': Inside the world of the U.S. agent who went undercover with the cartels:

Mail Online, UK

Celerino Castillo, by Wikipedia

Powderburns

Marijuana legalization wins majority support in poll: Los Angeles Times

Marijuana, Officially Legal in Colorado

In 2006, former Mexican president Felipe Calderón launched a massive crackdown against drug trafficking organizations, in conjunction with the United States. Since then, more than 40,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence: Council On

Foreign Relations

Washington State Gears Up for Marijuana Industry: Voice of America

Marijuana Legalization Canada: Liberal Party Lays Out Detailed Economic Plan For Pot: The Huffington Post, Canada

England Wants To Legalize Marijuana Through Cannabis Drug Reform: Inquisitr. Ltd.

More HERE.

A change of scenery by Washington Post

U.S. citizens traveling internationally in 2012, by destination

A change of scenery
Source: Office of Travel and Tourism Industries, Commerce Department. The Washington Post. Published on May 24, 2013

Image Credit

Mexico Travel Warning

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling to certain places in Mexico due to threats to safety and security posed by organized criminal groups in the country.
U.S. citizens have been the target of violent crimes, such as kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery by organized criminal groups in various Mexican states.  For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, which can vary, travelers should reference the state-by-state assessments further below.  This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.
General Conditions: 

Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year for study, tourism, and business, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day.  The Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations, and there is no evidence that organized criminal groups have targeted U.S. visitors or residents based on their nationality.  Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that are reported in the border region or in areas along major trafficking routes. 

Nevertheless, U.S. travelers should be aware that the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter organized criminal groups that engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico.  The groups themselves are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity.  Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur anywhere.  U.S. citizens have fallen victim to criminal activity, including homicide, gun battles, kidnapping, carjacking, and highway robbery.  While many of those killed in organized crime-related violence have themselves been involved in criminal activity, innocent persons have also been killed.  The number of U.S. citizens reported to the Department of State as murdered in Mexico was 71 in 2012 and 81 in 2013. 

Gun battles between rival criminal organizations or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico.  Gun battles have occurred in broad daylight on streets and in other public venues, such as restaurants and clubs.  During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily prevented from leaving the area. Criminal organizations have used stolen cars, buses, and trucks to create roadblocks on major thoroughfares, preventing the military and police from responding to criminal activity. The location and timing of future armed engagements is unpredictable.  We recommend that you defer travel to the areas specifically identified in this Travel Warning and exercise extreme caution when traveling throughout the other areas for which advisories are in effect.
The number of kidnappings throughout Mexico is of particular concern and appears to be on the rise.  According to statistics published by the Mexican Secretaria de Gobernacion (SEGOB), in 2013 kidnappings nationwide increased 20 percent over the previous year.  While kidnappings can occur anywhere, according to SEGOB, during this timeframe, the states with the highest numbers of kidnappings were Tamaulipas, Guerrero, Michoacán, Estado de Mexico, and Morelos.
Additionally, according to a widely publicized study by the agency responsible for national statistics (INEGI, the National Institute of Statistics and Geography), Mexico suffered an estimated 105,682 kidnappings in 2012; only 1,317 were reported to the police.  Police have been implicated in some of these incidents.  Both local and expatriate communities have been victimized.  Nearly 70 kidnappings of U.S. citizens were reported to the U.S. Embassy and consulates in Mexico between January and June of 2014.
U.S. citizens are encouraged to lower their personal profiles and to avoid displaying indicators of wealth such as expensive or expensive-looking jewelry, watches, or cameras.  U.S. citizens are encouraged to maintain awareness of their surroundings and avoid situations in which they may be isolated or stand out as potential victims.

Kidnappings in Mexico have included traditional, "express," and "virtual" kidnappings. Victims of traditional kidnappings are physically abducted and held captive until a ransom is paid for release.  "Express" kidnappings are those in which a victim is abducted for a short time and forced to withdraw money, usually from an ATM, then released.  A "virtual" kidnapping is an extortion-by-deception scheme wherein a victim is contacted by phone and convinced to isolate themselves from family and friends until a ransom is paid.  The victim is coerced (by threat of violence) to remain isolated and to provide phone numbers for the victim's family or loved ones.  The victim's family is then contacted and a ransom for the "kidnapped" extracted.  Recently, some travelers to Mexico staying at hotels as guests have been targets of such "virtual" kidnapping schemes.
Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments.  U.S. government personnel are specifically prohibited from patronizing these establishments in the states of Coahuila, Durango, Zacatecas, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosi, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas.
Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the border region, and U.S. citizens have been murdered in such incidents.  Most victims who complied with carjackers' demands have reported that they were not physically harmed.
Carjackers have shot at vehicles that have attempted to flee.  Incidents have occurred during the day and at night, and carjackers have used a variety of techniques, including roadblocks, bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop, and running vehicles off the road at high speeds.  There are indications that criminals target newer and larger vehicles, especially dark-colored SUVs.  However, even drivers of old sedans and buses coming from the United States have been targeted.  While violent incidents can occur anywhere and at any time, they most frequently occur at night and on isolated roads.  To reduce risk when traveling by road, we strongly urge you to travel between cities throughout Mexico only during daylight hours, to avoid isolated roads, and to use toll roads ("cuotas") whenever possible. 

The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat organized criminal groups.  U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways by car or bus may encounter government checkpoints, staffed by military or law enforcement personnel.  In some places, criminal organizations have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and have killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them.  You should cooperate at all checkpoints. 

The Department imposes restrictions on U.S. government employees' travel in Mexico.  Since July 2010, USG employees are prohibited from driving on non-official travel from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior of Mexico or Central America.  One exception is that personal travel by motor vehicle is permitted on Highway 15 toll road between Hermosillo and Nogales during daylight hours.
U.S. government personnel and their families are prohibited from personal travel to all areas to which it is advised to "defer non-essential travel".  When travel for official purposes is essential, it is conducted with extensive security precautions.  U.S. government personnel and their families are allowed to travel for personal reasons to the areas where no advisory is in effect or where the advisory is to exercise caution.  While the general public is not forbidden from visiting places categorized under "defer non-essential travel," U.S. government personnel will not be able to respond quickly to an emergency situation in those areas due to security precautions that must be taken by U.S. government personnel to travel to those areas. 

For more information on road safety and crime along Mexico's roadways, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information

State-by-State Assessment: 

Below is a state-by-state assessment of security conditions throughout Mexico.  Travelers should be mindful that even if no advisories are in effect for a given state, crime and violence can still occur.  For general information about travel and other conditions in Mexico, see our Country Specific Information.

More, HERE

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The New York Times

From Frommer's

Introduction to Mexico
The Best Cultural Experiences
The Best Beach Vacations
The Best Active Vacations
The Best Places to Get Away from It All
Getting There
Getting Around
Fast Facts
In One Week
In Two Weeks

MEXICO POPULAR DESTINATIONS 

See All 37 Destinations

Acapulco

Baja California

Cabo San Lucas

Campeche

Cancun

Chichen Itza

Colima

Mexico City

Yucatan Peninsula

MORE MEXICO TRAVEL, HERE.

© 2013 The New York Times Company

The Naturalization Process and Current Trends in Immigration in the United States: By Gender, By Age and By Marital Status

In 2011, the total number of persons naturalizing was 694,193. The leading countries of birth of new citizens were Mexico (94,783), India (45,985), the Philippines (42,520), the People's Republic of China (32,864), and Colombia (22,693). The largest number of persons naturalizing lived in California (151,183), Florida (87,309), and New York (76,603).

Historical trends have shown that the average number of persons that are naturalized annually has increased from less than 120,000 during the 1950s and 1960s to 210,000 during the 1980s, to 500,000 during the 1990s, and to 680,000 between 2000 and 2009. Naturalizations rose sharply during the mid-1990s because of various factors that include: 1) the 2.7 million undocumented immigrants legalized under the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 making them eligible for citizenship; 2) legislative efforts to restrict public benefits for non-citizens; and 3) the implementation of a mandatory program requiring replacement of permanent resident cards issued before 1977.

More, HERE.

 

Information submitted by Cooper Brimm, American Immigration Center

16 Ways to Get Through the Airport Faster

With airports that seem busier than ever, airline staffing reductions creating longer lines at check-in and airport security wait times that can be entirely unpredictable, these days the old airport "two-hour" rule often leaves just minutes to spare to buy a magazine, grab a snack or hustle your kids into the bathroom. Saving a few extra minutes here and there along the way can add up in your favor; here are 16 tips to get you from your front door to your seat on the plane as quickly and painlessly as possible -- as well as some ideas to keep you moving no matter what is going on with your flight.

More, HERE

© 2013 The Independent Traveler, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

15 Travel Tips to Get Through TSA Security


The savviest of travelers understand the security requirements and plan ahead. In the United States, airport security is run by the Transportation Security Administration, a division of the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees border security as well as technological research, response to national disasters and terrorism, and intelligence analysis.

 

These tips reflect TSA policies as of November 2012. And for students enrolled in a homeland security program, knowing this information is vital and applicable to your future career.

 

More, HERE.

 

© 2013, Master of Homeland Security

COMMUNITY NEWS


La Naval
Insurgentes Sur 373,
Esquina con Michoacán
Col. Exhipódromo Condesa
Tel. 55 84 3500. Servicio a Domicilio: 5584-3144
e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
CATAS: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Panadería La Espiga


INSURGENTES SUR 455, HIPODROMO CONDESA, CUAUHTEMOC, C.P. 06170, DF. Tel: (55)5564-7763

Ir al metro Chilpancingo es una de mis aventuras favoritas porque puedo visitar la panadería La Espiga. Este lugar lleva más de veinte años en el mismo lugar y tiene cosas deliciosas que ofrecer. Su tamaño es enorme, y dentro puedes encontrar comida, refrescos y bebidas, postres, entre otras cosas. El primer pasillo tiene papas y comida chatarra que puedes consumir. El segundo pasillo tiene todos los refrescos y las aguas al tiempo, en el fondo podrás encontrar los refrigeradores que tienen los refrescos y aguas frías, así como hielo. Más, AQUI.

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Autos con 15 Años de Antiguedad Dejarán de Circular en el D. F. Dos Veces a la Semana

http://www.solucionpolitica.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/hoy-no-circula.jpg

CREDITO DE LA IMAGEN: SOLUCION POLITICA

 

Cars Older than 15 Years will not circulate twice a Week
Tanya Müller García
Tanya Muller García, Secretaria del Medio Ambiente del Distrito Federal

 

Mexico City's Environment Secretariat

HOY NO CIRCULA

New Program of (Your Car) Does not Circulate in Mexico City. More information, HERE by Wikipedia

S P E C I A L   A N N O U N C E M E N T
Olivier Tschumi
Olivier Tschumi, a Swiss citizen, relocated to Mexico 22 years ago. He was kidnapped while jogging with his two dogs in a park north of Cuernavaca in the morning of December 19, 2010. A ransom was paid to the kidnappers on December 21 of same year, but Olivier continues to be in captivity to this date. Authorities have no leads to the kidnappers.

Security Corner in Mexico has been requested by Mr. Tschumi's family in Switzerland to have this information available to our readers in the event you happen to know or hear of Olivier's whereabouts. The Mexican Federal Attorney General's Office (PGR) is offering $5 million pesos as a reward to anybody providing information that will lead to the whereabouts of Mr. Tschumi

If you have any information, please write to Olivier's sister ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). Olivier has a 12-year old waiting to hear from you too. More information, in Spanish HERE
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Olivier Tschumi, citoyen suisse, s'est installé au Mexique il y a 22 ans. Au matin du 19 décembre 2010,  Il a été enlevé  lors d'un jogging avec ses deux chiens dans une forêt au nord de Cuernavaca. Une rançon a été payée selon les exigences des ravisseurs le 21 décembre de la même année. Olivier n'a pas été libéré, il a disparu depuis ce jour. L'enquête, menée par les  autorités mexicaines piétine.  Désespérée, la famille Tschumi en Suisse implore l'aide de tout le monde pour retrouver Olivier. Toute information concernant les ravisseurs et  sa localisation sera utile et  bienvenue. La famille d'Olivier a grand besoin de votre aide et vous remercie.

Le Bureau du procureur général fédéral mexicain offre $ 5.000.000 pesos en récompense à qui fournira des informations conduisant à retrouver Monsieur Tschumi. Si vous avez des informations, s'il vous plaît écrivez à la sœur d'Olivier, Email:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Olivier a une fille de 12 ans qui espère retrouver son papa grâce à votre aide! Plus d'informations en espagnol ICI


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Culture of Safe Travel, Crime & Loss Prevention

 

VIDEOS

 

INTRODUCTION (English language) 

INTRODUCCION A ESQUINA DE LA SEGURIDAD


PREVENTING KIDNAPPING EXPRESS IN MEXICO CITY

MEXICO CITY SUBWAY SYSTEM, SAFE, EFFICIENT, INEXPENSIVE


WORDS OF ADVISE FROM SUBWAY SECURITY PERSONNEL

 

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Mexico City Hash House Harriers

 

INTERNATIONAL DRINKING Jarra CLUB WITH A RUNNING PROBLEM

www.mchhh.com

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www.mchhh.com

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SOCIAL SERVICES

 

Cuernavaca's Center for Happy Sr. Citizens, contributing to the enhancement of life quality. Monday to Friday: 8AM to 14:00 hrs. Among other courses specially designed for the elderly: literature, history, philosophy, IT, English, Spanish, artistic workshops: music, painting, cuisine, manual art; sports and entertainment: dancing, zumba, danzon, yoga, aqua-aerobics, reading. Emotions' handling, conferences, legal advise for inheritance, tanatology.

More information: Río Amacuzac 435, Col. Vistahermosa, tels. (01- 777) 221-6250(01- 777) 221-6250 (01- 777) 221-6250Contact person: Alejandra Morales Leija

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American Benevolent Society

 

American Benevolent Society Newsletter by American_Benevolent

Paseo de la Reforma 1870-201 Lomas de Chapultepec, Miguel Hidalgo. Mexico, D.F. 11000 Mexico

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New "HOY NO CIRCULA" rules go into effect Tuesday, July 1, 2014‏

 

Here's an explanation of how the new program "hoy no circula" works, starting TUESDAY, July 1st

 

If you have any information that is different from this PLEASE let us know right away so we can send it out. Brand new vehicles that have the hologram 00 are able to drive for two years, the car will have to update the hologram  at the expiration date and be inspected . You have two months after the expiration date to renew the hologram (have the car inspected).
Hologram 0, if your vehicle does not pass the 00 you will be given the hologram 0.  You can still drive everyday of the month, but instead of the two years permit, the expiration is set for six months, then you will have to renew the hologram. For information on the dates of the renewal, the link of the government will be posted at the end of the mail.
Hologram 1, this hologram is usually for vehicles between 9 and 15 years of usage. the vehicles with the hologram number 1 will not be able to circulate two Saturdays a month and one day on midweek. (the Saturday depends on the license plate of the car, see the government link for more details) and one day on midweek that also depends on the license plate of the car.

And there will be the new hologram 2.

According to the news of El Universal vehicles with the hologram number 2 that are over 15 years in circulation will not be able to circulate any Saturday of the month and also one day midweek.

 

It seems that the government is willing to change the hologram 2 for the hologram 1 if the vehicles pass the regulation test. This regulation will start on Tuesday July 1st. of 2014.  For more details here is the link of the news. And here is the link for the government program "Hoy no circula"

Talking history: The American Benevolent Society turns 140 by Catherine Dunn, Insidemex

History

CNN

 

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

Click on HERE to get CNN updated news

Defector: North Korea has 1,800 cyberwarriors

A defector who worked as a computer expert for Pyongyang says North Korea is running a network of hackers engaged in cyber warfare against its perceived enemies. FULL STORY

U.S. ready to blame N.Korea

Sony pulls 'Interview' release Sony pulls 'Interview' release

Celebrities slam movie decision

Obama: 'Go to the movies'

Analyst: We underestimated N. Korea

PUTIN'S RUSSIA

Putin: 'We're not warmongers'

Putin blames West for Russia's misery

What would you ask Putin? What would you ask Putin?

Bizarre promo of Putin released

The cult of Vladimir Putin The cult of Vladimir Putin

10 things to know about Russia

THE LATEST

Boko Haram kidnaps 185, kills 32

New dawn in U.S.-Cuba relations

Obama explains new Cuba policy Obama explains new Cuba policy

Carter: Cuba took 'political courage'

Mars has gas; a fuzzy sign of life?

Chinese sign petition to ban HIV+ boy

Police probe 'sex attacks' on boys

Militants: Attack to avenge strikes

Blood litters school floors Blood litters school floors

Uber to toughen background checks

FIFA investigator Garcia quits

Judge: No Jobs trial video release

Sporting world record falls again

FIVE STORIES NOT TO MISS

Selma protesters invoke Ferguson

'Heaven' actor: I did something terrible

Nut scandal exec. faces legal action

Cosby's daughter stands by father

25 random facts about 'The Simpsons'

OPINION AND ANALYSIS

Putin's woes are about to get worse

Why Russia's crisis matters

Bush & Clinton: Are they ready?

Pakistan must resist extremism

What do Pakistan Taliban want?

Defending 'The Interview' a farce

© 2014 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Oprima ESTE ENLACE electrónico para ver las noticias actualizadas de México de CNN en Español de esta fecha

¿Adiós a la policía municipal? 6 voces tocan el tema

Senadores, alcaldes y analistas dan argumentos en pro y en contra de la propuesta de Peña para crear 32 policías estatales de mando único Ir a la nota

El plan de Peña en seguridad se verá hasta febrero

11 claves del nuevo plan de seguridad federal

Las propiedades del gabinete

Malinalco y las otras 101 casas y terrenos

Un palco de 12 metros, pinturas de Dalí, Picasso...

La casa blanca deja ver 5 "huecos" sobre el conflicto de interés

Últimas noticias

El diputado secuestrado en Morelos fue liberado

Boko Haram secuestra a 185 mujeres y niños

Zonas montañosas de 19 estados registrarán heladas

5 predicciones económicas para México en 2015 CNNExpansión

El desbloqueo de Cuba amenaza la inversión en Cancún Obrasweb

Dos muertos, en ataque a militares en Tamaulipas

6 grandes víctimas de la crisis económica de Rusia CNNExpansión

"Pida perdón", protesta una mujer ante Peña Nieto

Las FARC declaran un cese al fuego unilateral

Un tiroteo entre grupos revive tensiones en Michoacán

OPINIÓN: La guerra llega a las escuelas de Pakistán

El plan magisterial contra la elección en Guerrero

Walmart México pierde la batalla del streaming

Hamas sale de lista europea de grupos terroristas

¿Qué hará Japón ante las acusaciones contra Aguirre?

Pacquiao vs Mayweather, ¿ahora sí habrá pelea?

Video

EU-Cuba, un interés mutuo Video

"El gesto de Obama es de valentía": Nicolás MaduroVideo

¿Quién es Alan Gross?Video

¿Por qué se dio el enfrentamiento en Michoacán?Video

Malala: "Fue un ataque atroz y cobarde"Video

Cubanos en Miami reaccionan por nuevas políticas Video

"Muchas gracias presidente Obama": Alan GrossVideo

EU y Cuba 'descongelan' relaciones diplomáticasVideo

"Vamos a crear más oportunidades entre EU y Cuba"Video

Nacional

Zonas montañosas de 19 estados registrarán heladas

Diputado local de Morelos es privado de su libertad

Tiroteo entre grupos revive tensiones en MichoacánVideo

El plan magisterial contra la elección en Guerrero

Ejército y PF no agredieron a los normalistas: PGRVideo

Tiroteo entre Hipólito y 'Americano' deja 11 muertos

Raúl Salinas, no culpable de enriquecimiento ilícito

Mundo

Cuba: en la mira de un mejor sistema de internet

Solo el 5% de la población tiene acceso sin filtros a internet, un internet que además contiene muchas restricciones Ir a la nota

Cubanos en Miami, molestos por el anuncio

Corea del Norte fue subestimada en cibernética

Varias pistas apuntan a que los norcoreanos han refinado su capacidad cibernética, lo que llevó a la intrusión masiva a Sony Pictures Ir a la nota

Cosas que fastidian a Corea del Norte: Navidad, telenovelas...

EU 'mira' hacia Pyongyang por ataque a Sony

Espías quedan libres por el acuerdo Cuba-EU

Las FARC declaran un cese al fuego unilateral

9 datos sobre el embargo de Estados Unidos a Cuba

Los cambios en la relación entre EU y CubaFotogalería

 

© 2006 Derechos Reservados Expansión, S.A. DE C.V.

El Universal has no official political affiilation and is the most read newspaper in Mexico

Oprima AQUI para ver noticias actualizadas del periódico El Universal

Estados

Reportan 10 detenidos por plagio de diputado

Uno de los aprehendidos resultó lesionado durante el tiroteo registrado, indican autoridades del gobierno de Morelos

Guerreros Unidos planeaban matar hoy a diputado

Según información del gobierno de Morelos, para el grupo criminal que secuestró al diputado era más redituable la ejecución, por el daño que causaría a la administración del gobernador Graco Ramírez

Liberan a diputado perredista plagiado en Morelos

Secuestran a diputado del PRD fuera de su casa

"Secuestro de diputado morelense, con móvil político"

El Mundo

EU y Cuba ponen fin a medio siglo de Guerra Fría

Cuba y Estados Unidos pusieron fin a la Guerra Fría en América, luego de que sus presidentes, Raúl Castro y Barack Obama, anunciaran ayer el restablecimiento de las relaciones diplomáticas tras más de medio siglo de ruptura y hostilidades

Cancillería mexicana saluda el acuerdo

Debate en el exilio, entre la rendición y la gratitud

El fin de las intolerancias

El Papa y Canadá, claves en las negociaciones bilaterales

Oportunidad para México

Quedamos fuera

Saldos negativos

Termina la Guerra Fría en América

Editorial EL UNIVERSAL México ignorado

Video Cuba y EU anuncian normalización de relaciones diplomáticas

Video Cuba libera a estadounidense Alan Gross tras 5 años en prisión

Galería Alan Gross regresa a EU tras aprehensión en Cuba

Sondeo ¿A qué país beneficiará más el restablecimiento de relaciones?

Nación

"México, listo para negociar con Cuba y EU": Sergio Alcocer

El subsecretario para América del Norte de la Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores, Sergio Alcocer, prevé que el próximo año se reactive la discusión de la frontera marítima no resuelta en el Golfo

Mario Melgar-Adalid Cuba vive, ¡viva Cuba!

León Krauze El deshielo de Obama

Salvador García Soto Cambia geopolítica en América

Cartera

Dólar a la venta permanece en 14.82 pesos en el DF

Grupo Financiero Ve Por Más explicó que el mercado de divisas abrió con un tono mixto, después de la resolución de la reunión de la Reserva Federal que se mostró paciente en cuanto al plazo para subir las tasas

Estados

Velan a hijo de Hipólito Mora en La Ruana

Familiares de Manuel Mora mencionaron que el cuerpo llegó a las 03:00 horas y fue entregado a su padre, quien lo llevó a su domicilio

Michoacán: todos dispararon

Fuerzas federales "blindan" La Ruana; llegan 400 elementos

Tardarán 48 horas investigaciones en La Ruana: Castillo

Metrópoli

Asesinan a vocalista de grupo musical en Culhuacán

Metrópoli

Choque deja un muerto y 17 lesionados en la México-Puebla

Metrópoli

Se contradice Valencia sobre accidente de auto

Jaime Serra | El día que engañó al Congreso

El recuento de la fuga de dólares en las reservas internacionales de México

De no existir previa autorización, queda expresamente prohibida la publicación, retransmisión, edición y cualquier otro uso de los contenidos de El Universal



Proceso is a weekly magazine, renowned for its left-wing journalism

Oprima AQUI para ver las noticias actualizadas de la revista Proceso de esta fecha

Arturo Montiel podría pisar prisión si no presenta a los hijos que tuvo con Versini

Rescatan a diputado secuestrado en Morelos

Con tinte político, secuestro de diputado perredista: gobierno de Morelos

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Mientras el gobernador Graco Ramírez reparte …

La ONU exige al gobierno mexicano tomar medidas para combatir desapariciones

Asesinan a músico en la delegación Coyoacán

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Hipólito Mora y José Luis Torres, Simón El Americano, cuyos grupos se enfrentaron el martes pasado en La Ruana, con un saldo de 11 muertos, deberán entregar sus armas, rendir declaración y someterse a las diligencias necesarias …

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Luego del enfrentamiento más reciente entre grupos de exautodefensas en Michoacán, con saldo de 11 muertos, la oposición en la Cámara de Diputados adelantó que pedirá la comparecencia del comisionado federal Alfredo Castillo para que explique “por …

LA RUANA, Mich. (apro).- Elementos del Ejército, la Policía Federal y la Gendarmería tomaron literalmente esta población, luego de los hechos de violencia registrados la víspera entre dos grupos antagónicos de la Fuerza Rural que dejó un saldo de 11 …

No eran ‘cuestión de percepción’ secuestros y asesinatos en el Ajusco; implementan operativo

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Tuvieron que registrarse tres hechos de violencia en cadena –el secuestro de ocho ciclistas, el hallazgo del cadáver de una estudiante de …

Se recupera peso frente al dólar; se cotiza en $14.43

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Luego de dos semanas a la baja, el peso recuperó este día terreno ante el dólar, al cotizarse en 14.43 unidades por …

Corte de EU pone a Zhenli Ye Gon al borde de la extradición a México

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- La Corte de Apelaciones del Cuarto Distrito con sede en Richmond, Virginia puso hoy al empresario Zhenli Ye Gon al borde de …

Obama confirma normalización de relaciones diplomáticas con Cuba

WASHINGTON (apro).- El presidente Barack Obama anunció hoy la restauración de las relaciones diplomáticas con Cuba y encomió al Congreso federal a levantar el embargo …

Nacional

Echan a socióloga de evento tras exigirle a Peña pedir perdón por Ayotzinapa

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- El fantasma de Ayotzinapa se le …

Dice Peña Nieto que 2014 fue de “claroscuros” para su gobierno

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- El presidente Enrique Peña Nieto celebró …

Descalifican senadoras del PAN a Mancera por reforma capitalina

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- La polémica por la abrupta cancelación …

Estados

Abogados de presuntos agresores buscan acuerdo con reporteras de Silao

SILAO, Gto. (apro).- En audiencia ante el juez de …

Grupos de autodefensa demandan salida del Ejército en municipio guerrerense

AYUTLA DE LOS LIBRES, Gro. (apro).- Habitantes y miembros …

Solicitan a Peña y a gobernador de Q. Roo liberación de periodista maya

CANCÚN, Q. Roo (proceso.com.mx).- El Comité para la Protección …

Se amparan ciudadanos contra el megaproyecto Monterrey VI

MONTERREY, N.L. (apro).- Organismos civiles interpusieron hoy un amparo …

“Ayotzinapa nos exhibió como victimarios”: líder del PRD-DF

Morena rebasa al PRD en intención de voto para la ALDF


17 de diciembre de 2014

Ediciòn 1989; 13 de Diciembre, 2014

Ayotzinapa

La historia no oficial

La noche del 26 de septiembre policías de Iguala y Cocula, obedeciendo órdenes del alcalde igualteco, atacaron a los normalistas de Ayotzinapa, mataron a tres y a otros 43 se los entregaron a Guerreros Unidos, grupo que presuntamente los …

Declaraciones a base de torturas

En torno al caso del ataque a los normalistas de Ayotzinapa, actas de la Procuraduría General de la República (PGR) prueban que al menos cinco de los supuestos integrantes de Guerreros Unidos detenidos y que declararon contra el exalcalde …

Intento de soborno de la Segob para “superar” la tragedia

Al gobierno de Enrique Peña Nieto, cuya imagen se desmorona ante los ojos del mundo, le urge dejar atrás el caso Ayotzinapa. Y ni siquiera cuando está más desacreditado por las sospechas de corrupción que lo envuelven, abandona prácticas …

Los narcomunicipios “modelo zeta”

Para el senador y exjefe del gobierno de la Ciudad de México Alejandro Encinas la crisis reciente del PRD tiene dos fechas clave: 2008, “cuando el gobierno de Felipe Calderón le entrega la dirigencia a Jesús Ortega” –su excontendiente …

Iguala-Cocula-Taxco: el corredor de las desapariciones

Dedicado desde 2007 a apoyar a familias de desaparecidos en Guerrero, el Taller de Desarrollo Comunitario (Tadeco) sostiene que la entidad está llena de fosas clandestinas. Los municipios de Iguala, Cocula y Taxco, asegura, son corredores mortales, y en …

Los diputados quieren quitarle la calle a la gente

El albazo de la dupla PRI-PAN en San Lázaro el martes 2 no sólo es inconstitucional, pues intenta suprimir el derecho a la manifestación, sino que complementa lo que hicieron en abril de 2013, cuando modificaron la Ley de …

El ciudadano ya se metió en la agenda política

El movimiento ciudadano que nació en solidaridad con los 43 normalistas desaparecidos y ocupa las calles de México desde hace más de dos meses está “en pañales”, además de que los intentos gubernamentales de reprimirlo no lo inhibirán, sino …

Corrupción

Angélica Rivera es, en sí misma, un conflicto de interés de Peña Nieto

Al margen de la increíble historia del financiamiento del Grupo Higa para la adquisición de la residencia de Sierra Gorda por parte de Angélica Rivera, el video en el cual ésta explica cómo adquirió sus inmuebles tiene un dato, …

La multiplicación de las casas

Las mansiones construidas y financiadas por el empresario Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantú para beneficiar al círculo íntimo del presidente Enrique Peña Nieto siguen apareciendo aquí y allá, pero hasta el momento ninguna de las instancias de auditoría gubernamental se …

Para Hinojosa Cantú, una tajada del acueducto Monterrey VI

Legisladores del PAN, así como activistas nuevoleoneses y medios locales, exigen al gobernador Rodrigo Medina de la Cruz cancelar el proyecto Acueducto VI por considerarlo innecesario y ostentoso. Llevan meses quejándose porque esa obra que, según los datos recabados, …

Pese al boicot priista, va adelante la Comisión Casa Blanca

La relación político-empresarial de Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantú, proveedor predilecto del gobierno federal, con Enrique Peña Nieto, su esposa Angélica Rivera y con uno de sus hombres más cercanos, Luis Videgaray, secretario de Hacienda, hizo que la Cámara de …

Fiscalía anticorrupción: a la búsqueda de un Eliot Ness independiente

“Queremos un Eliot Ness para México”, dijo el panista Roberto Gil Zuarth en el Senado, el mismo órgano legislativo que podría designar este domingo 14 al primer fiscal anticorrupción de la federación. Y Juan Miguel Alcántara Soria ya levantó …

Narcotráfico

Coahuila tuvo su Ayotzinapa

En 2011 un comando zeta atacó un municipio coahuilense: buscaba a dos supuestos traidores. Como no los halló, decidió secuestrar a unas 50 personas. Algunas fueron asesinadas, pero el destino de la mayoría aún se desconoce. El Ejército permitió …

El Cártel de Sinaloa hace negocios con el extremismo islamista

Un informe reciente de la DEA ubica al Cártel de Sinaloa –asociado con narcotraficantes colombianos– como una de las organizaciones criminales que surten de droga a grupos islamistas del occidente africano, quienes al revenderla obtienen ganancias que ponen al …

Washington desprestigia a “Proceso”… y rectifica

WASHINGTON.- En su lucha contra el narcotráfico mexicano y en especial contra el Cártel de Sinaloa, el gobierno de Estados Unidos se valió de una portada de Proceso supuestamente para ilustrar la red armada por Alfredo Vázquez Hernández, presunto …

Internacional

Diagnóstico desde Berlín: El Estado mexicano pierde el control

En Alemania las tensiones entre la oposición y el gobierno, a propósito de la próxima firma de un acuerdo de cooperación en seguridad con la administración mexicana, crecen y entorpecen las negociaciones, que Angela Merkel se empeña en llevar …

En el ataque a normalistas, fusiles prohibidos

BERLÍN.- “Fusil HK. Modelo G-36. Calibre 5.56 X 45 mm. SDN. Longitud cañón: 51 cm. Con mira (telescópica). Matrícula 83-012579. Con cargador. (Ubicación) Cuartel Regional de la Policía del Estado con sede en Iguala, Guerrero. Balística forense y Lunge.” …

…Y Suecia analiza un embargo de armas

BRUSELAS.- Luego de que la desaparición de los 43 normalistas de Ayotzinapa dejó al descubierto la complicidad entre el crimen organizado y los cuerpos de seguridad, el Parlamento sueco decidió incluir el caso de México en su agenda. …

Agustín Edwards, desclasificado

Uno de los hombres más poderosos de Chile es Agustín Edwards Eastman, dueño del diario El Mercurio. Promotor del golpe militar contra Salvador Allende en 1973, ha logrado que los gobiernos posdictatoriales le den cobijo. El periodista Víctor Herrero …

Más, AQUI.

PROCESO 1988

The Mexican government, welcomed as a partner of the Canadian and U.S. governments in continental economic development and security, also happens to partner in the slaughter of its own people. The murders and disappearances of the students from the Rural Normal “Raúl Isidro Burgos,” of Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, Mexico on September 26, 2014 in Iguala, was a crime of the state, as hundreds of thousands of Mexicans have claimed in their protests.
The governmental investigation that followed the September 2014 attack on these students has been deliberately incompetent and not aimed at getting to the roots of the crime that are, in fact, the tangled web of state-drug gang corruption and the state’s dirty war in defense of the neoliberal transformation of Mexico. The investigation has been staged, quite ineffectively, as a public relations operation to calm foreign investors and to cool protests, efforts that have completely failed within Mexico. By claiming that the blame was at the local level (the corrupt collusion of a local mayor and his avaricious wife with a brutal cartel) the national government seeks to present itself as the defender of justice.
But as Luis Hernández Navarro shows in his article “La matanza de Iguala y el Ejército” (The Iguala Massacre and the Army), there is—and has long been—a deep entanglement between the army, the local government of Iguala, and drug production. Guerrero  accounts for more than 60% of the Mexican production of poppies and opium gum for making heroin, and the cities of Iguala and Chilpancingo are key centers for its storage and transportation.
- See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa Was a Crime of the State

- See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Edición 1988; 6 de Diciembre, 2014

© 2013 Proceso

 

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 18 December 2014 11:28
 
MEXICO: Communities Up In Arms, By Prof. Lorena Ojeda, CLAS, Berkeley University; Mexican Judge Frees 2 Witnesses To Army Killings; Mexico Vows To Sell Dollars To Halt Peso's Slide; A Murky Mortgage: The Economist
Sunday, 23 November 2014 10:42

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The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners - Public Service

For a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper or news site through the use of its journalistic resources, including the use of stories, editorials, cartoons, photographs, graphics, videos, databases, multimedia or interactive presentations or other visual material, a gold medal. Awarded to The Washington Post for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security. and Awarded to The Guardian US for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, helping through aggressive reporting to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.

Finalists also nominated as a finalist in this category was Newsday, Long Island, N.Y., for its use of in-depth reporting and digital tools to expose shootings, beatings and other concealed misconduct by some Long Island police officers, leading to the formation of a grand jury and an official review of police accountability.

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INTERNATIONAL

Jeb Bush and associates hint at a 2016 run

The former Florida governor and his allies are sending increasingly strong signals that he’s gearing up for a campaign, asking others not to commit to potential rivals. Some are saying he could announce his intent within a month.

Fix: Public shows interest in Romney

Holder won’t compel reporter to reveal source

Ending a years-long debate, the Justice Department has ruled out calling the New York Times’ James Risen to testify about his source in reporting on a CIA plot, a source familiar with the case said.

Senate moves closer on spending bill, but acrimony still holds up process

Senate moves closer on spending bill, but acrimony still holds up process
The House quietly passed another funding extension, giving senators more time on the $1.1 trillion plan.

Congress approves defense bill

A win and a loss for big banks

LIFTOFF & LETDOWN

Why America’s middle class is lost

Why America’s middle class is lost
PART 1 | American workers took the U.S. to the moon. Then something went horribly wrong for them.

See how income has changed in your county

A space hub's takeoff and descent | VIDEO

2 U.S. troops, Afghan Supreme Court official among 15 killed by Taliban

2 U.S. troops, Afghan Supreme Court official among 15 killed by Taliban
The Taliban has warned that attacks will continue as most foreign troops prepare to leave Afghanistan.

After Ferguson and the Sony hack, ‘Selma’ lands with uncanny timeliness

After Ferguson and the Sony hack, ‘Selma’ lands with uncanny timeliness
CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK | The film about Martin Luther King Jr. resonates eerily after recent events.

Macadamias and silver spoons: Why ‘nut rage’ is a big deal in South Korea

Macadamias and silver spoons: Why ‘nut rage’ is a big deal in South Korea
WORLDVIEWS | The stink raised by the Korean Air chairman’s daughter highlighted her family’s power.

AirAsia jet diverted after attack on stewardess

Opinions

Will two world travelers suit each other’s tastes for adventure?

Will two world travelers suit <br />each other’s tastes for adventure?
DATE LAB | They both have a lot of mileage on their passports, but they say they’re ready to unpack.

‘I was surprised . . . that 2 hours had gone by’

@Work Advice: Betrayed by a potential employer

Why oil keeps getting cheaper

Why oil keeps getting cheaperChris Mooney

The International Energy Agency’s new report makes crystal clear why oil prices are tumbling.

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MEXICO NEWS

Image Credit

 

A federal judge dismissed criminal charges on Monday against two women who witnessed the June 30 army killing of suspected drug gang members in southern Mexico.
A selection of our best images of 2014 from Latin America and the Caribbean starts with the case of 43 missing - and apparently slain - students in Mexico that ignited indignation across the country and around the world. Officials acknowledged they disappeared at the hands of a corrupt local government and federal authorities took 10 days to intervene.
Mexico is ready to intervene in currency markets to fight the peso's fall against the dollar amid concerns over dropping oil prices and a possible increase in U.S. interest rates.

Mexicans’ search for students’ bodies reveals a history of hidden deaths


Guillermina Sotelo Castañeda holds a photo of her son. (J. Levinson for Post)

Joshua Partlow

Forty-three students went missing in September, but they were hardly the first. Their abduction by police has let loose a flood of new accusations.

In Mexico's forest of the disappeared

As violence in Mexico's drug-ravaged southern region continue, local vigilante form their own law enforcement to become judge and jury.
More than two months after they disappeared, concrete evidence is beginning to emerge on the fate of 43 college students whose case has caused a political crisis in Mexico. At least one of them has been identified among charred remains found several weeks ago near a garbage dump, family and government officials say.
Mexico's congress has passed legislation to ban the use of animals in circuses across the country.

The government announced on Thursday the start of bidding for oil exploration rights in 14 areas of the Gulf of Mexico being opened to domestic and international companies as Mexico ends a seven-decade state monopoly on the petroleum business.

Adán Cortés Salas jumped onstage when the Pakistani teenager was collecting her Nobel peace prize.

Mexico's president on Thursday announced measures to boost the economy in Guerrero, making his first visit to the tumultuous state since 43 students disappeared there more than two months ago and set off the biggest crisis of his administration.

President Barack Obama said Tuesday that the U.S. has offered to help Mexico figure out what happened to 43 college students who have been missing since September, but he stopped short of saying that aid to the U.S. ally and neighbor should be reconsidered on the basis of the country's human rights record.

Mexican president visits state of missing students

Mexico's president on Thursday announced measures to boost the economy in Guerrero, making his first visit to the tumultuous state since 43 students disappeared there more than two months ago and set off the biggest crisis of his administration.

IMF head warns of bumpy road for Latin America

Latin America faces a rocky road ahead despite social and economic achievements in recent years, the head of the International Monetary Fund said Friday.

Renowned Mexican author, playwright and journalist Vicente Lenero has died. He was 81.
Federal police and soldiers will take over policing duties in the resort of Acapulco to ensure the safety of tourists amid a wave of violence and protests that has scared away visitors, Mexican authorities said Wednesday.
Protesters marched in several cities in Mexico on Monday to mark the second anniversary of President Enrique Pena Nieto's administration and demand the government find 43 students who disappeared at the hands of police.

AIDS Day concert, teachers march for missing students in Mexico, ice storm in Hungary and more.
Mexico's most corruption-plagued municipal police forces would be replaced by state police within two years under a bill President Enrique Pena Nieto has submitted to Congress.
Olegario Vazquez Rana of Mexico has been re-elected as the international shooting federation president for a ninth four-year term.
The parents of an 11-year-old Mexican boy who recently had portions of a massive tumor removed will be allowed to stay in the U.S. while he receives treatment, New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez's office said Tuesday.

By Associated Press November 29, 2014

TIXTLA, Mexico — The men are holed up with their buses on the college’s soccer field, sleeping in the compartments that once held passenger luggage and hanging the clothes they’ve hand-washed from the windshields.

While attention has focused on the kidnapping and disappearance of 43 students from the Raul Isidro Burgos teachers college in Tixtla, few have paid much attention to the three dozen or more bus drivers who say they are being forced by activists from the school to live as captives and act as chauffeurs for the very people who commandeered their vehicles.

The drivers, some of whom have been at the southern Mexico school more than a month, say they cannot abandon the buses because their companies hold them financially responsible for the vehicles, some of which are worth well over a hundred thousand dollars. And with authorities unwilling to inflame tensions over the disappearance and presumed massacre of students from the school, no one is coming to their rescue.

“They say we aren’t kidnapped because we can get out and walk around, or swim in the (campus) pool,” said one driver who, like the others holed up at the school, refused to give his name for fear of angering the students. “But a prison inmate can also go out to the exercise yard or the gym, and that doesn’t mean they’re free.”

More, HERE.

Mexico's president announced a nationwide anti-crime plan Thursday that would allow Congress to dissolve local governments infiltrated by drug gangs and give state authorities control over often-corrupt municipal police.
Thousands of fans in Mexico City paid homage Sunday to Roberto Gomez Bolanos, the late Mexican comedian who played the boy television character "El Chavo del Ocho" that defined a generation for millions of Latin American children.

Garcia Marquez family explains archive decision

The family of Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez says the late Colombian novelist's archive was offered only to the University of Texas, which will be the materials' repository.

Juan Carlos Llorca, a veteran Associated Press journalist who covered immigration and the drug war along the U.S.-Mexico border, and whose reporting on illegal international adoptions helped prompt national reforms in Guatemala, has died at age 40.

A panic alert flashed across Alberto Herrera's computer screen. Men claiming to be with the notorious Gulf Cartel had stopped a convoy transporting chemicals through a lawless region of northeastern Mexico. They seized two drivers from an escort truck and demanded the valuable cargo in exchange for their release.
The earpiece is usually the giveaway. Or, maybe it's the dark suits, the big SUVs with tinted windows or the menacing Dodge Avengers in black, always black.
Mexico's left faces huge problems following the resignation of former presidential candidate Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, a pillar of progressive politics and son of the revered president who nationalized the oil industry.
Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, a pillar of leftist politics in Mexico and son of the revered president who nationalized the oil industry, resigned Tuesday from the political party he founded, citing disagreements with its leadership.

Bill Clinton's incorrect comparison between U.S. and Mexican engineering graduates

The former president says the U.S. and Mexico have about the same number of engineering graduates. That's wrong.
An 11-year-old Mexican boy with a massive tumor who drew international attention when U.S. officials helped him get treatment in New Mexico is still recovering after an 11-hour surgery to remove pieces of the growth.

Mexico summons Uruguay's ambassador over comment

Mexico summoned Uruguay's ambassador on Sunday after the South American country's president described Mexico as a kind of "failed state" in a magazine interview.

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from Latin America

Tens of thousands of demonstrators marched in Mexico City to demand that authorities find 43 missing college students. The march was held on a day traditionally reserved for the celebration of Mexico's 1910-1917 Revolution. Protests turned violent when demonstrators clashed with riot police near the capital's international airport and later when they tried to storm the national palace. Demonstrators were arrested and photojournalists attacked.

The Mexican navy confirmed on Saturday that a U.S. marshal was wounded in Mexico while working with naval personnel in the northwestern state of Sinaloa during the summer.

Angry Mexicans protest over 43 missing students

A largely peaceful march by tens of thousands demanding the return of 43 missing students ended in violence, as a small group of masked protesters battled police in Mexico City's main square.

Demonstrators clashed with riot police in Mexico City's Zocalo square after thousands marched Thursday demanding that authorities find 43 missing college students.

Winners and losers under Obama's immigration plan

President Barack Obama unveiled one of the most sweeping changes to the U.S. immigration system in decades, shielding millions from deportation.
What the nation's governors and governors-elect of states that border Mexico said following Obama's speech.

Mexico has its own immigration problem: American retirees

Americans are said to overstay their welcome in Mexico while the government turns a blind eye.
Brad Pitt and George Clooney are intercepted by Mexico's border patrol. Carlos Slim, the world's richest man, is ready to audition for a soap opera.
The U.S. Embassy in Mexico says the U.S. government will provide $68 million over five years to assist Mexico's effort to reform its court and justice system.
Demonstrators take to the streets to demand justice for 43 students who are missing and presumed dead.
The Colima volcano in western Mexico has erupted, sending a column of ash about 3 miles (5 kilometers) into the air.

Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies, Spring 2014

Why America Is to Blame for Mexico's Carnage and Corruption

BY John M. Ackerman, November 26, 2014

The crisis over 43 massacred students shows how dysfunctional and corrupt Peña Nieto's government is. And yet Obama keeps patting him on the back.

Le Monde

Soupçons sur un autre enlèvement massif au Mexique 6

France 24 affirme qu'une trentaine de lycéens ont été enlevés en juillet à Cocula, village voisin d'Iguala, et sont toujours portés disparus.

Etudiants disparus au Mexique : un leader historique de la gauche démissionne de son parti

Après la disparition de 43 étudiants, les dirigeants politiques du Mexique affrontent une crise historique.

Edito du Monde

Le retour des heures sombres au Mexique

Deux ans après son entrée en fonctions, le président mexicain, Enrique Peña Nieto, est confronté à la plus grave crise de son mandat.

Récit

Polémique sur la somptueuse villa de l’épouse du président mexicain

Les soupçons de conflit d’intérêts se multiplient, et ce alors que le président Peña Nieto affronte la plus grave crise de son mandat après la disparition de 43 étudiants.

Compte rendu

Révolte contre l’« Etat-mafia » au Mexique

Après la disparition de 43 étudiants, le président Peña Nieto affronte la plus grave crise de son mandat.

Mexique : heurts après un défilé pour les étudiants disparus Vidéo

Des heurts se sont produits entre des groupes de manifestants et la police anti-émeute face au Palais national, au centre de Mexico, jeudi.

Des heurts dans le centre de Mexico autour de la disparition des 43 étudiants

Policiers et manifestants se sont opposés devant le Palais national au centre de la capitale, jeudi soir.

Pourquoi le Mexique se révolte-t-il après l'enlèvement de 43 étudiants ? Vidéo

Les manifestations violentes se succèdent au Mexique depuis l'enlèvement de 43 étudiants, le 26 septembre. Comment cette crise est-elle devenue le symbole d'une colère profonde de la population?

Mexique : marche nationale des familles des disparus Vidéo

Les familles veulent dire « non » à la violence.

Plus de Mexique, ICI

© Le Monde.fr

The Wall Street Journal

New Ties by Mexico Builder Roil Nation

Opposition parties called for a probe into a loan and home purchase the Mexican finance minister secured from the same politically connected businessman who built and held the title to a mansion for Mexico’s first lady.

- See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.pt7agj56.dpuf

Mexico Digs Into Ties Between Leader, Builder

Little-Known Government Deals Won by a Contractor Seen Close to President Peña Nieto Emerge, as Opposition Calls for Probes

U.S. Marshals Service Personnel Dressed as Mexican Marines Pursue Cartel Bosses

Members of U.S. Marshals Service Join Military Operations in Mexico Against Drug Gangs

More, HERE.

Copyright ©2014 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

NPR

November 19, 2014

Eyder Peralta

Amid rumblings about conflict of interest and corruption, Mexico's first lady says she will sell a multimillion-dollar home in one of the most glamorous areas of Mexico City.

In a YouTube video released late Tuesday, Angélica Rivera defiantly proclaims that she has "nothing to hide."

"I have worked all my life, and because of that I am an independent woman capable of building a patrimony with honesty," she said.

Rivera and her husband, President Enrique Peña Nieto, have been under heavy scrutiny lately: first, because of the way the government has handled the case of 43 students who went missing after they were detained by police, and then after Aristegui Noticias revealed that an opulent modern structure dubbed "The White House" and valued at $7 million was owned by a construction company awarded millions in government contracts.

As Aristegui explained, the house, which Rivera showed off in a glitzy spread in the royal-centric magazine ¡Hola!, was just another symbol of the "close relationship between Peña Nieto and Grupo Higa."

According to the investigation, Grupo Higa is owned by Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantú, who in the past rented out airplanes for the Peña Nieto's 2012 presidential campaign. The company, Aristegui reports, received millions of dollars in contracts in the state of Mexico when Peña Nieto was governor.

Once Peña Nieto was in the presidential palace, a subsidiary of Hinojosa's company was awarded part of a huge contract to build a high-speed train from Mexico City to Querétaro.

Just days before the report was published, Peña Nieto canceled the $3.7 billion contract.

More, HERE.

© 2014 NPR

Al Jazeera America

VIDEO: Mexico's Nieto faces growing calls to resign

02 Dec 2014

President's second anniversary in office marred by protests as he and the government are accused of corruption.

With help from the Obama administration, Peña Nieto is brutally reshaping Mexican society

Through the story of one immigrant family, we explore the evolution of racism and migration in the US.

President Pena Nieto proposes changes to police force following uproar over presumed massacre of 43 students.

Ferguson: Lawmakers urge calm, offer few policy prescriptions

Analysis: Think riots have never caused change in America? Think again

Brown's parents vow to 'keep fighting' for justice

Protesters upset by Ferguson decision storm St. Louis City Hall

Confronting race and inequality in the US

Week before verdict, 12 killed by US law enforcement

Please click on HERE to get updated Al Jazeera, Mexico news

Drug trafficking organizations are rapidly splintering, but there€’s no end in sight to the violence

Topics:

Mexico

Drugs

Drug Cartels
The village warriors of Guerrero

Cocaine, heroin and avocados

Thousands march in Mexico over students

Tens of thousands of people angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students are marching in Mexico City as part of another day of nationwide protests.

Protesters on Thursday waved blackened flags of Mexico and many chanted for the resignation of President Enrique Pena Nieto. "He will fall, he will fall, Pena Nieto will fall," they chanted.

Some protesters clashed with riot police near the city's international airport at the start of the day's demonstrations, burning tyres, throwing firebombs and launching firecrackers at police.

Thursday’s protest was the latest protest over the government's handling of a crime that has infuriated Mexicans fed up with corruption, impunity and a drug war that has left more than 100,000 people dead or missing since 2006.

The case has turned into the biggest challenge of Pena Nieto's nearly two-year-old presidency, on top of another scandal over a mansion his wife bought from a government contractor.

'Mexico is hurting'

The crisis erupted after the mayor of the city of Iguala allegedly ordered police to confront students on September 26, sparking a night of violence that left six people dead and 43 missing, authorities say.

Protesters angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students take to the streets for another day of demonstrations.

More, HERE.

Police officer fires on Mexico City students, inflaming tensions

Students had been planning for a Nov. 20 national strike in solidarity with 43 missing students from Guerrero

INSIDE STORY

VIDEO: Missing Mexico students: Who is responsible.

Protesters demand justice for missing 43 trainee teachers who are feared murdered in Mexico. To watch video click on HERE.

Mexico president pushes trade ties in China while protests rage at home

Peña Nieto's Beijing trip amid massive political crisis at home shows heavy bet on China ties as economic boost

Mexico missing student protesters burn state buildings

Protest movement has hit Guerrero'€™s tourism industry with vacationers canceling trips during busiest time of year.

Photos: In Acapulco, an angry demonstration over missing students

Students, peasants and others attempt to block the airport and clash with police.

Mexico leader travels to Asia amid rising unrest over missing students

Peña Nieto faces increased calls to resign as another presidential scandal emerged over the weekend

Mexico protesters set fire to National Palace over missing students

Gang members have confessed to killing the 43 missing students and dumping their charred remains in a landfill.

Gang members confess to mass killing of Mexico students

Charred human remains found in a dumpster are likely the students who disappeared on Sept. 26, Mexican authorities say.

Mexican army accepts criticism of human rights commission in killings

The defense department says, however, it doesn't agree with all findings of human rights commission on the June slayings.

Why have the most recent kidnappings in Mexico sparked such outrage?

The disappearance of 43 students in Mexico has triggered nationwide demonstrations for government accountability.

Thousands protest missing Mexico students despite mayor arrest

Public anger over student disappearances brings Mexico City to a standstill; full-blown crisis for President Peña Nieto.

Photos: Protests over 43 Guerrero students target government buildings

A city congress and buildings tied to the ruling party are trashed and burned.

The food producer has developed more than 480 varieties of wheat, upping production by an estimated 200 million tonnes.
Mexican official: CIA 'manages' drug trade

Spokesman for Chihuahua state says US agencies don't want to end drug trade, a claim denied by other Mexican officials

24 Jul 2012, by Chris Arsenault

Juarez, Mexico - The US Central Intelligence Agency and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers", a spokesman for the Chihuahua state government in northern Mexico has told Al Jazeera, instead "they try to manage the drug trade".

Allegations about official complicity in the drug business are nothing new when they come from activists, professors, campaigners or even former officials. However, an official spokesman for the authorities in one of Mexico's most violent states - one which directly borders Texas - going on the record with such accusations is unique.

"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva, the Chihuahua spokesman, told Al Jazeera last month at his office in Juarez. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."

Accusations are 'baloney'

Villanueva is not a high ranking official and his views do not represent Mexico's foreign policy establishment. Other more senior officials in Chihuahua State, including the mayor of Juarez, dismissed the claims as "baloney".

"I think the CIA and DEA [US Drug Enforcement Agency] are on the same side as us in fighting drug gangs," Hector Murguia, the mayor of Juarez, told Al Jazeera during an interview inside his SUV. "We have excellent collaboration with the US."

Under the Merida Initiative, the US Congress has approved more than $1.4bn in drug war aid for Mexico, providing attack helicopters, weapons and training for police and judges.

More than 55,000 people have died in drug related violence in Mexico since December 2006. Privately, residents and officials across Mexico's political spectrum often blame the lethal cocktail of US drug consumption and the flow of high-powered weapons smuggled south of the border for causing much of the carnage.

"The war on drugs is an illusion," Hugo Almada Mireles, professor at the Autonomous University of Juarez and author of several books, told Al Jazeera. "It's a reason to intervene in Latin America."

"The CIA wants to control the population; they don't want to stop arms trafficking to Mexico, look at [Operation] Fast and Furious,” he said, referencing a botched US exercise where automatic weapons were sold to criminals in the hope that security forces could trace where the guns ended up.

The Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms lost track of 1,700 guns as part of the operation, including an AK-47 used in 2010 the murder of Brian Terry, a Customs and Border Protection Agent.

More, HERE.

© 2014 Al Jazeera America, LLC. All rights reserved.

InSight Crime

InSight Crime is a foundation dedicated to the study of the principal threat to national and citizen security in Latin America and the Caribbean: organized crime. We seek to deepen and inform the debate about organized crime in the Americas by providing the general public with regular reporting, analysis and investigation on the subject and on state efforts to combat it. More about Insight Crime HERE.

Iguala Massacre: Mexico's PR Message Goes Up in Flames

The stunning, dramatic blow-by-blow account of what most likely happened to the 43 missing students in Guerrero is an indication of just how desperately Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto and his team are trying to perform damage control on a terrifying story -- one that has not only unsettled his government, but has pushed them to admit that things are not as their public relations machine would have you believe.

In the hour-long November 7 press conference (see video below), Attorney General Jose Murillo Karam announced that the recent capture of alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos led to confessions that the students were taken by police while en route to the town of Iguala. The police handed the students over to the Guerreros Unidos, who then killed them and burned their remains.

Specifically, video testimonies from three recently captured “masterminds” of the attacks revealed that the students were carted like cattle to a landfill in Cocula. According to one suspect, approximately 15 students asphyxiated on the way to the dump site. The remaining students were interrogated by members of the Guerreros Unidos before being shot and killed. The bodies were then thrown into the landfill, arranged in a circle, covered in sticks, gasoline, and diesel, and burned. The fire reportedly lasted for 14 hours, from midnight on September 27, until mid-afternoon.

According to the testimonies, a leader of the criminal group known as “El Terco” ordered the burned human remains to be collected and placed into eight black plastic bags. Members of the Guerreros Unidos then took the bags to the San Juan River in Cocula, where they dumped the contents into the water, while two bags were thrown directly into the river.

Following the confessions, search teams found black bags, one of which was still closed. Mexican and Argentine forensic teams reportedly confirmed the bag contained human remains. However, due to the degree to which the bodies were burned, forensic experts have not yet determined when the remains will be able to be identified.

More, HERE.

Business Insider

Tens Of Thousands Of Mexicans Protest In The Streets Over 43 Missing Students

Carola Sole, AFP

Oct. 9, 2014

Mexico City (AFP) - Tens of thousands of people held protests in Mexico, joining tearful families of 43 missing students demanding their return amid fears a police-backed gang executed them.

Crowds on Wednesday gathered from Mexico City to the violence-wracked state of Guerrero, where the students disappeared, and as far south as Chiapas.

Parents of the victims traveled from Guerrero to head a march of thousands of people in Mexico City, tearfully holding up pictures of their sons, and signs reading "we want them back alive."

More, HERE.

----------------

Mexican Official Accuses CIA Of 'Managing' Not 'Fighting' The Drug Trade

Jul. 24, 2012, by

A Mexican state government spokesman told Al Jazeera that the CIA and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers" as much as "try to manage the drug trade," Chris Arsenault reports.

"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Chihuahua spokesman Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva told Al Jazeera. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."

More, HERE.

Copyright © 2014 Business Insider Inc. All rights reserved.

Infowars.com

Former CIA Officer Says ISIS and Mexican Drug Cartels Communicate

U.S. Gov. and CIA connected to drugs and terror

By Kurt Nimmo | Infowars.com | August 21, 2014

A former CIA officer, now a security consultant who regularly appears on Fox News, told the Laura Ingraham Show Thursday ISIS and Mexican drug cartels communicate with each other.

“We’ve had good intel over the years about al-Qaeda, about their efforts to coordinate with, as an example, Mexican cartels… in an effort to try to exploit our southern border,” Mike Baker told Ingraham.

The one-time CIA employee said there is “a lot of communication” between ISIS and drug cartels and “the cartels are a business… if there’s a revenue stream they can exploit, then they will, and the extremists understand that.”

It is not clear if this intel was passed on to Baker by his former colleagues.

In 2012 a spokesman for the Chihuahua state in Mexico, Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva told Aljazerra the CIA and other intelligence agencies manage the drug trade in Mexico.

More, HERE.

Contact:512-291-5750512-291-5750 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Infowars, P.O. Box 19549, Austin, TX 78760

The Daily Beast

Anatomy of a Mexican Student Massacre

10.08.14, by Jason McGahan

For almost a century a teacher’s college in rural Mexico has been training educators and activists. Last month, dozens were abducted and slaughtered—by the police.

MEXICO CITY — Twelve days ago, police and unidentified gunmen believed to be members of a drug cartel ambushed a caravan of college student activists in the state of Guerrero, about half way from Mexico City to Acapulco.

Near the central plaza in the town of Iguala, a total of six persons were shot to death. Three were student activists from the Raúl Isidro Burgos Rural Teachers College of Ayotzinapa. Three additional shooting victims were a semiprofessional soccer player riding in one of the three buses, a taxi driver, and his female passenger. But most likely they were unintended victims caught in the line of fire. There’s no question the students were the target.

One who survived the first fusillade, a 19-year-old named Julio César Mondragón, panicked and, over the objections of classmates who said they should stay together, ran away on his own. He was later found dead and horribly disfigured; a photo of his corpse has gone viral in Mexico: it shows the face stripped away to the bare skull underneath.

Survivors of the incident report that the police and thugs attacked the students three times. They sprayed one of the buses with machine gun fire. One eyewitness reported seeing the police force students out of another bus at gunpoint. In addition to the three students killed, 17 student activists were wounded. But they may have been the lucky ones. As many as 44 others were abducted. Some reports say they were taken away in police vehicles. None of them have been seen since September 26.

The precise motives for the killings are difficult to determine, but the students come from a school that has been training rural teachers—and activists—for the better part of a century. Their commitment to helping small farmers and farm workers in the rugged, semi-feudal countryside often has put them at odds with the local powers that be. And when you add to that the cozy relationship that exists today between some of those powers and narcotics traffickers, the situation is explosive.

More, HERE.

© 2014 The Daily Beast Company LLC

The New American

U.S. Government and Top Mexican Drug Cartel Exposed as Partners

14 January 2014, by 

For over a decade, under multiple administrations, the U.S. government had a secret agreement with the ruthless Mexican Sinaloa drug cartel that allowed it to operate with impunity, an in-depth investigation by a leading Mexican newspaper confirmed this week. In exchange for information and assistance in quashing competing criminal syndicates, the Bush and Obama administrations let the Sinaloa cartel import tons of drugs into the United States while wiping out Sinaloa competitors and ensuring that its leaders would not be prosecuted for their long list of major crimes. Other revelations also point strongly to massive but clandestine U.S. government involvement in drug trafficking.

Relying on over 100 interviews with current and former government functionaries on both sides of the border, as well as official documents from the U.S. and Mexican governments, Mexico’s El Universal concluded that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and the U.S. Justice Department had secretly worked with Mexican drug lords. The controversial conspiring led to increased violence across Mexico, where many tens of thousands have been murdered in recent years, the newspaper found after its year-long probe. The U.S. agents and their shady deals with Mexican drug lords even sparked what the paper called a “secret war” inside Mexico.

The newspaper’s investigation also confirmed long-held suspicions that U.S. authorities were signing secret agreements with Mexican drug cartels — especially Sinaloa, which CIA operatives have said was a favorite for use in achieving geo-political objectives. Supposedly without the knowledge or approval of officials in Mexico, ICE and DEA, with a green light from Washington, D.C., made deals with criminal bosses allowing them to avoid prosecution for a vast crime spree that has included mass murder, corruption, bribery, drug trafficking, extortion, and more. In exchange, cartel leaders simply had to help U.S. officials eliminate their competitors — certainly a win-win scenario for crime bosses who prefer to operate without competition or fear of prosecution.

More, HERE.

Alex Newman, a foreign correspondent for The New American, is normally based in Europe after growing up in Latin America, including seven years in Mexico. He can be reached at   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Related articles:

CIA “Manages” Drug Trade, Mexican Official Says

Reports: CIA Working with Mexican Drug Cartels

Trafficker: U.S. Feds Aided Mexican Drug Cartel

Mexican Drug Trafficker Says He Worked With Feds

Stratfor Sources: U.S. Troops in Mexico as Feds Aid Cartels

Congress Probes DEA Drug Money Laundering Scheme

Feds Let Mexican Cartel Hit Men Kill in U.S., Senior Lawman Told Stratfor

Fast and Furious: FBI Now Linked to Murder of U.S. Border Agent

U.S. Judge: Obama Homeland Security Aiding Criminal Conspiracies

Impeachment Support Soars as Voters Say Feds “Out of Control”

Copyright © 2014 The New American

GlobalPost – International News

Mexico accepts student demands in bid to avert spread of protests

Agencia EFE; October 4, 2014

Mexico City, Oct 4 (EFE).- Mexico's government has accepted all the demands of student protesters at the National Polytechnic Institute, or IPN, a public university in this capital, in a bid to prevent the movement from spreading to other higher education institutions.

On Sept. 22, students at the IPN's Superior School of Engineering and Architecture halted activities to protest new internal regulations that they said lowered the institution's academic and professional level.

More, HERE.

Copyright EFE, 2014.

Home

US Military’s Training of Mexican Security Forces Continues As Human-Rights Abuses Mount In Mexico

Posted by Bill Conroy - December 3, 2014

DoD Officials Claim Training is Part of the Solution, Not the Problem

The U.S. government has spent more than $62 million since fiscal year 2010 providing highly specialized training to Mexican security forces, including some $16.3 million in fiscal 2013, as part of an effort to help Mexico better prosecute its war on drugs, records made public under the U.S. Foreign Assistance Act show.

Local Opposition to Washington’s Legal Marijuana Businesses Is a Taxing Issue For the Fledgling Industry

Posted by Bill Conroy - November 14, 2014

Effort to Overcome City Moratoriums on Cannabis Shops Could Spark an Unlikely Alliance

The great experiment in the state of Washington to legalize the sale of marijuana through a regulated and taxed market has hit a hitch at the local level that threatens to slow progress to a snail’s pace, even as more and more marijuana businesses obtain the state licensing needed to open their doors.

Through early November, Washington’s cannabis market, state records show, included some 63 retailers, 239 producers and 197 processors — all issued the required state-level licenses to begin doing business in the state. But the battle ahead for many of them — and others in the pipeline — to actually open their doors for business is far from over.

More, HERE.

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Labor Unions Are Supporting Washington State Legal Marijuana Dispensaries that Create "More Workers to Organize"

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 22, 2014

The United Food and Commercial Workers and other Unions Seek to Strengthen Protections for Cannabis Workers

What’s going on in the state of Washington and beyond with the movement to legalize marijuana is, only in part, about business, taxes and government oversight — all to be amplified by the billions of dollars annually this new industry promises to throw off.

More, HERE.

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Community Police in Guerrero’s Costa Chica Region to Celebrate 19 Years of a Better Way to Combat Crime and Corruption

The Same Southern Mexican State Where 43 Students Were Disappeared Is also Home to a Grassroots Movement that Shows How People Can Police Themselves When the State Becomes Criminal.

By Greg Berger and Oscar Olivera

Special for The Narco News Bulletin

November 7, 2014

Publisher’s Note: In Mexico and throughout the world the state of Guerrero has become a vivid example of the horrors of the “war on drugs” and the pervasive corruption and violence it invites from all levels of government. On September 26, Mayor Jose Luis Abarca of the city of Iguala ordered police to detain a group of students from the local Ayotzinapa teachers’ college. The mayor’s ties to organized crime have been widely documented. It is believed that the mayor thought the students were planning to stage a protest at a public event held by his wife. Police then killed six students, and 43 more were disappeared. The police reportedly turned the 43 youths over to a local criminal gang. Multiple mass graves have been dug up in the area, each at first rumored to contain the bodies of the students, then have been revealed to be the tombs of previous nameless casualties of the US-imposed drug war.

The whereabouts of the missing students are still unknown.

More, HERE.

-------------------

Millions Missing From DEA Money-Laundering Operation

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 6, 2014

But No One With the Power to Investigate Seems to Care

At least $20 million went missing from money seizures by law enforcers, critical evidence was destroyed by a federal agency, a key informant was outed by a US prosecutor — contributing to her being kidnapped and nearly killed — and at the end of the day not a single narco-trafficker was prosecuted in this four-year-long DEA undercover operation gone awry.

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Charles Bowden has died, but his voice is louder than ever

Posted by Bill Conroy - September 2, 2014

As one of the original authentic journalists, he trailblazed a path for others to follow

When I heard that he had passed, my eyes welled with tears. I’m of stoic Irish stock, so I don’t shed tears easily, but the news of Charles Bowden’s death (1945-2014) was not an easy thing to bear. He had been a mentor and a friend to me for a decade, and his leaving hurts.

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Official US Cover-Up Still Obscures Motive for Juarez Consulate Murders

Posted by Bill Conroy - May 7, 2014
-------------------------------------------------

U.S. Military: More Counter-Narcotics Funding Will Help Stem Exodus of Children from Central America

By Bill Conroy - July 29, 2014

 

Critics Argue Drug-War Money is Part of the Problem, Not the Solution.

 

Some 58,000 migrant children, mostly Central Americans, have made the treacherous journey to the U.S. southern border alone over the past 10 months, but actions being considered by U.S. officials to combat the problem with more military and drug-war aid to their countries, critics warn, may worsen the violence that provokes this unprecedented exodus.

 

The number of unaccompanied children that have arrived at the U.S. border so far this fiscal year is up 106 percent from the same period a year earlier — with the total expected to reach 90,000 before Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year.


To put that latter number in perspective, it is nearly five times larger than the number of Border Patrol agents now stationed along the entire southern border.

More, HERE.
-----------------

MORE NARCO NEWS, HERE

25 Deadliest Mass Shootings in U.S. History Fast Facts

By CNN Library; September 2, 2014

(CNN) -- Here is a list of the 25 deadliest single day mass shootings in U.S. history from 1949 to the present. If the shooter was killed or committed suicide during the incident that death is not included in the total.

Timeline:

32 killed - April 16, 2007 - Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. A gunman, 23-year-old student Seung-Hui Cho, goes on a shooting spree killing 32 people in two locations and wounds an undetermined number of others on campus. The shooter, Seung-Hui Cho then committed suicide.

27 killed - December 14, 2012 - Sandy Hook Elementary School - Newtown, Connecticut. Adam Lanza, 20, guns down 20 children, ages 6 and 7, and six adults, school staff and faculty, before turning the gun on himself. Investigating police later find Nancy Lanza, Adam's mother, dead from a gunshot wound. The final count is 28 dead, including the shooter.

23 killed - October 16, 1991 - In Killeen, Texas, 35-year-old George Hennard crashes his pickup truck through the wall of a Lubys Cafeteria. After exiting the truck, Hennard shoots and kills 23 people. He then commits suicide.

21 killed - July 18, 1984 - In San Ysidro, California, 41-year-old James Huberty, armed with a long-barreled Uzi, a pump-action shotgun and a handgun shoots and kills 21 adults and children at a local McDonalds. A police sharpshooter kills Huberty one hour after the rampage begins.

18 killed - August 1, 1966 - In Austin, Texas, Charles Joseph Whitman, a former U.S. Marine, kills 16 and wounds at least 30 while shooting from a University of Texas tower. Police officers Ramiro Martinez and Houston McCoy shot and killed Whitman in the tower. Whitman had also killed his mother and wife earlier in the day.

14 killed - August 20, 1986 - Edmond, Oklahoma part-time mail carrier, Patrick Henry Sherrill, armed with three handguns kills 14 postal workers in ten minutes and then takes his own life with a bullet to the head.

13 killed - November 5, 2009 - Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan kills 13 people and injures 32 at Fort Hood, Texas, during a shooting rampage. He is convicted and sentenced to death.

13 killed - April 3, 2009 - In Binghamton, New York, Jiverly Wong kills 13 people and injures four during a shooting at an immigrant community center. He then kills himself.

13 killed - April 20, 1999 - Columbine High School - Littleton, Colorado. 18-year-old Eric Harris and

17-year-old Dylan Klebold kill 12 fellow students and one teacher before committing suicide in the school library.

13 killed - September 25, 1982 - In Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 40-year-old George Banks, a prison guard, kills 13 people including five of his own children. In September 2011, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturns his death sentence stating that Banks is mentally incompetent.

13 killed - September 5, 1949 - In Camden, New Jersey, 28-year-old Howard Unruh, a veteran of World War II, shoots and kills 13 people as he walks down Camden's 32nd Street. His weapon of choice is a German-crafted Luger pistol. He is found insane and is committed to a state mental institution. He dies at the age of 88.

12 killed - September 16, 2013 - Shots are fired inside the Washington Navy Yard killing 12. The shooter, identified as Aaron Alexis, 34, is also killed.

12 killed - July 20, 2012 - Twelve people are killed and 58 are wounded in a shooting at an Aurora, Colorado, movie theater screening of the new Batman film. James E. Holmes, 24, is taken into custody outside of the movie theater. The gunman is dressed head-to-toe in protective tactical gear, set off two devices of some kind before spraying the theater with bullets from an AR-15 rifle, a 12-gauge shotgun and at least one of two .40-caliber handguns police recovered at the scene.

12 killed - July 29, 1999 - In Atlanta, 44-year-old Mark Barton kills his wife and two children at his home. He then opens fire in two different brokerage houses killing nine people and wounding 12. He later kills himself.

10 killed - March 10, 2009 - In Alabama, Michael McLendon of Kinston, kills 10 and himself. The dead include his mother, grandparents, aunt and uncle.

9 killed - March 21, 2005 - Red Lake High School, Red Lake, Minnesota. 16-year-old Jeff Weise kills his grandfather and another adult, five students, a teacher and a security officer. He then kills himself.

9 killed - June 18, 1990 - In Jacksonville, Florida, 42-year-old James Pough, angry about his car being repossessed, opens fire at at a General Motors Acceptance Corp. office, killing nine people. Pough takes his own life.

8 killed - October 12, 2011 - Eight people are killed during a shooting at the Salon Meritage in Seal Beach, California. The suspect, Scott Evans Dekraai, 41, of Huntington Beach, is arrested without incident as he is trying to leave the scene. The eight dead include Dekraai's ex-wife, Michelle Fournier, 48. He was armed with three guns -- a 9 mm Springfield, a Smith & Wesson .44 Magnum, and a Heckler & Koch .45 -- and was wearing body armor during the shooting rampage.

8 killed - August 3, 2010 - Manchester, Connecticut - Omar Thornton kills eight co-workers at Hartford Distributors before turning the gun on himself. Thornton had been asked to resign for stealing and selling alcoholic beverages.

8 killed - January 19, 2010 - Christopher Speight, 39, kills eight people at a house in Appomattox, Virginia. He surrenders to police at the scene the next morning, and is charged with one count of murder with additional charges pending.

8 killed - March 29, 2009 - In Carthage, North Carolina, 45-year-old Robert Stewart kills a nurse and seven elderly patients at a nursing home. In May, the Moore County district attorney announces she will seek the death penalty. On September 3, 2011, a jury finds Stewart guilty of second-degree murder. Stewart is sentenced to 141 to 179 years in prison.

8 killed - December 5, 2007 - In Omaha, Nebraska, 19-year-old Robert Hawkins goes to an area mall and kills eight shoppers before killing himself.

8 killed - July 1, 1993 - In San Francisco, 55-year-old Gian Luigi Ferri kills eight people in a law office and then kills himself.

8 killed - September 14, 1989 - In Louisville, Kentucky, 47-year-old Joseph Wesbecker armed with a AK-47 semiautomatic assault rifle, two MAC-11 semiautomatic pistols, a .38 caliber handgun, a 9-millimeter semiautomatic pistol and a bayonet kills eight co-workers at Standard Gravure Corporation and then kills himself. He had been placed on disability leave from his job due to mental problems.

8 killed - August 20, 1982 - In Miami, 51-year-old history teacher Carl Robert Brown, angry about a repair bill and armed with a shotgun, kills eight people at a machine shop. He flees by bicycle, but is shot in the back by a witness who pursued him. He was on leave from school for psychological treatment.

List of rampage killers (school massacres), by Wikipedia

List of school shootings in the United States, by Wikipedia

Starting with Pontiac's Rebellion school massacre on July 26, 1764 to August 6, 2014in River Woods Elementary when an 11-year-old student at RWES in Des Moines, Iowa, brought a BB gun to the school accompanied by two former students aged 11 & 16. The student admitted to having the weapon and making threats against 4 students. Police recovered the gun and arrested the alleged students

More, HERE.

America's Wars: U.S. Casualties and Veterans

The table below has information about the total number of service members, battle deaths, and nonmortal woundings in wars from 1775 to 2012; such as the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War I and II, Vietnam, and more

Information Please® Database, © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

67% of all homicides in the U.S. were conducted using a firearm: UN

According to the FBI, in 2012, there were 8,855 total firearm-related homicides in the US, with 6,371 of those attributed to handguns. 61% of all gun-related deaths in the U.S. are suicides. More, HERE by Wikipedia.

Crime in the United States

Crime in the United States has been present since colonization

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GLOBAL RESEARCH

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa was a Crime of the State

By Richard Roman and Edur Velasco Arregui

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iraqichildren

“From the beginning of humankind there has been brutality, conflict, intrigue, the destructive obsession with a narrow self-interest”, said Blair in acceptance. Freudian slip or what. He praised “the magnificent American and British Military” with Save The Children and other NGOs for their work in Africa.

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ISIL invasion

The US led war against the Islamic State is a big lie. Going after ”Islamic terrorists” is used to justify a military agenda. The Islamic State is a creation of US intelligence. Washington’s “Counter-terrorism Agenda” in Iraq & Syria consists in Supporting the Terrorists.

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Disappeared Students in Mexico: Global Struggle for Ayotzinapa Captures World’s Attention

By Telesur Global Research, November 22, 2014
More than 200 actions were carried out Thursday, coinciding with Mexico’s Day of Revolution.

A student’s skin was peeled over his head in a gruesome and clear display of a narco-state murder. The photo of the murder, which took place in the drug war-torn state of Guerrero some seven weeks ago, quickly went viral on the Internet. On the same day, five other people were killed and some 43 more students went “missing” in the small town of Ayotzinapa. In a press conference addressing the abuses more than one month after the disappearance of the students, who hailed from a rural-based and selective teachers college in Guerrero, an Attorney General presumed them “dead” without presenting any evidence to substantiate his conclusion. The nation’s leading prosecutor said he was “tired” by the end of the press conference, much to the chagrin of those who sympathized with the plight of the parents of the disappeared students.

Those happenings have served as the sparks that have ignited the nation’s ire to a feverish boiling point in one of the largest countries and economies of Latin America. Mexico has witnessed near daily and nation-wide actions of resistance. Since the disappearance of the “normalistas” (students training to be teachers) on September 26, the country has been brimming with mass marches, candle-light vigils, university-campus and labor-union-led strikes, occupations of official and university buildings, riot police-led arrests of demonstrators, property destruction of official buildings, sit-ins, panels ruminating over the ills of narco-state violence and international bridge closings.

While the 43 students, who are technically still missing due to the lack of any corpses being forensically tied to the students, were what clearly catalyzed the movement’s inception, much of the country has long been weary of the systematic problem of disappearances and the eery official impunity which has often surrounded them. Nothing less than some 24,000 disappearances, over the course of the last three years alone, account for official estimates. Other analysts estimate the actual total as being far higher than that.

The Mayor of Iguala and his wife, dubbed as the “imperial couple,” were arrested several weeks ago, as teleSUR previously reported. At the time of their arrest, speculation was that their detention may produce valuable clues that could help solve the case of the disappeared students. However, no significant advances have been made in the case since the detention of the couple. At the time of their arrest, the on-the-run couple were fugitives from the law and in hiding when authorities busted them at a rented home in Itzapalapa, Mexico City.

More, HERE.

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Angry Protests Sweep Mexico after Government Says Missing Students are Dead


Global Research, November 11, 2014

Angry protests swept Mexico over the weekend in the wake of a press conference Friday in which Jesús Murillo Karam, the country’s attorney general, declared that 43 missing teaching students from the Ayotzinapa Normal School in the state of Guerrero are all dead. Murrillo based this evaluation on confessions by gang members that they had killed the students, who were handed over to them by the police, and then burned their bodies.

Demonstrations in both Mexico City and the Guerrero capital of Chilpancingo saw clashes with police and attacks on government buildings. In the capital, a small group of demonstrators launched an attack on the historic National Palace in the city’s main square (El Zócalo). They first used metal security barriers to ram the building’s wooden door and then doused it with gasoline and set it on fire.

Some demonstrators questioned why it took police so long to respond to these acts, suggesting that they could have been the work of provocateurs.

More, HERE.

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More than 100,000 March in Mexico City over Disappeared Students

By Rafael Azul; Global Research, November 07, 2014

A mass protest march of more than 100,000 students, teachers, education workers and ordinary citizens took place in Mexico City on Wednesday, November 5, in solidarity with the 43 missing teaching students, normalistas, of the Ayotzinapa Normal School, who have been missing for over 40 days.

This was the third mass demonstration and by far the largest and angriest. Many of the participants directed their anger at President Enrique Peña Nieto, demanding that he resign. One protest sign denounced him “for corruption, betraying the nation, ineptitude,” calling him a “repressor and assassin.”

Others carried signs that said, “It was the State.” Leading the march were students from Mexico City’s National Autonomous Metropolitan University (UNAM), the Polytechnic Institute, rural teaching colleges, and Iberian-American University, who all had joined a massive nationwide 72-hour student strike.

At Mexico City’s Constitution Square (the Zócalo), many thousands greeted the protesters as they arrived after the two-and-a-half-hour march from the president’s mansion (Los Pinos). At the mass rally, family members of the 43 disappeared students spoke to the demonstrators. None of the major political parties (the governing PRI, the PAN, the PRD, the Greens) were involved in the protest.

More, HERE.
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Mexico Disarms Local Police in Missing Students’ City

By Press TV,Global Research, October 07, 2014

Mexican federal forces have disarmed the entire police department in the southern city of Iguala after its officers were accused of collaborating with a gang behind the recent disappearance of 43 students.

On Monday, the government’s new federal police unit took over security in Iguala, located some 200 kilometers (125 miles) south of the capital, Mexico City.

The federal unit was tasked with holding order in the city and helping search for the students who went missing last month after a deadly police shooting.

The deployment in the southern violence-stricken state of Guerrero came after President Enrique Pena Nieto vowed to establish justice and bring an end to corruption in the country.

Pena Nieto said he had dispatched the federal forces to Iguala to “find out what happened and apply the full extent of the law to those responsible.”The decision to disarm Iguala’s police corps came just days after 28 charred bodies were found in a mass grave on the outskirts of the city.

State prosecutor Inaky Blanco has said the recovered bodies probably belonged to the missing students. State officials also say it will take up to two weeks to receive the results of DNA tests to identify the corpses.

The students, all trainee teachers, went missing following a police attack on September 26 against a protest over teachers’ rights.

According to Blanco, state investigators have obtained video footage showing local police arresting a number of students during the clashes and taking them away.

Prosecutors said the Guerreros Unidos drug gang also participated in the police shooting that left six people dead and 25 others wounded.

Mexican authorities have already arrested 22 officers and issued arrest warrants for Iguala mayor Jose Luis Albarca and his security chief over the deadly incident.

More, HERE.

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Militarization and Political Crisis in Mexico

Is Mexico a Narco-State?

By Michael Werbowski;Global Research, May 31, 2010

Mexico - In the wake of Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s recent state visit to the U.S and Canada, a burning question remains without any clear answer.

2010 is historically significant for Mexico. It is its bi-centennial year of independence ( in 1810 the country began to break free from Spanish imperial tutelage) and perhaps more significantly is is also the centenary year of the 1910 Mexican revolution. There is little to celebrate though. The country this year, is still reeling from the vortex of drug-trafficking crimes, the global economic down-turn and the fall-out from the histrionics and panic induced by the H1N1-Swine flu “pandemic” of 2009.

Mexico after a decade of the centre-right almost “corporatist” PAN ( National Action Party) party’s rule, ( as in 2000, the first PAN candidate won the presidency, Vincente Fox) has been practically “Balkanised”. And as a result, it is now faced with a crippling fragmentation of the federation itself, due mainly to territorial battles or “turf wars” going on between rival drug cartels, which operate almost with impunity in many Mexican states. Possibly, the most fascinating and insightful read on this phenomenal topic is: Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State? . While I was pondering over the question raised by the book’s title , I was somewhat astonished to read in (despite what I witnessed first hand in Mexico) the concluding chapter, a rather reassuring reply. That basically, Mexico is far from becoming another Somalia, Pakistan or Haiti.

More, HERE.

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Destabilizing Mexico

By Rev. Richard Skaff; Global Research, March 13, 2009

Attorney General Eric Holder stated on February 25, 2009 that Mexican drug cartels pose a national security threat, and issued a direct warning to these cartels that they will be destroyed.

The warning came as the attorney general and acting Drug Enforcement Administration chief Michele Leonhart announced the completion of the final phase of DEA’s “Operation Xcellerator,” which targeted the Sinaloa cartel, a major western Mexico drug operation that has been expanding its reach into the United States . [1].

Meanwhile, the blood shed in the Mexican cities continues to be extensive and has expanded its tentacles of violence to various cities in Mexico. Lawlessness, corruption, murders, decapitations, and kidnappings have taken the Mexican cities by a storm, giving rise to a new radical group calling itself the Juarez Citizens Command that is threatening to strike back against lawlessness that has gripped Mexico for a long time. The group stated that they are going to strike back by killing one criminal a day until order and peace is restored. Similar groups are popping up all across Mexico. [2].

In its last report, the US Department of justice disclosed that 17.2 billion dollars in cash entered Mexico in only the past two years as a result of money laundering operation in their country. The report advised that Mexico and Colombia are the principal destinations of narco resources that operate in the US and that “the laundering of drug money is a global industry” with transnational organizations present in various countries. [2].

According to a DEA undercover operative, the Mexican drug cartels have gained more and more of the American market. They have grown bolder in their attempts to expand their operations in Mexico and the United States . They now control the ruling party in Mexico and operate the biggest drug business on earth right here in the USA . [2].

Mexico’s drug and violence problem now engulfs the entire country, inundating cities along the U.S.-Mexico border. The robust drug cartel reduced its position in the western mountains, and lunged into the heart of national power in Mexico City. The capital that was once relatively immune to such contemptuous boldness of drug killings has become the scene of multiple assassinations of high-ranking federal police officials in about a week. More than 1,000 people have been killed in Mexico this year in drug-related violence and about 6,290 in 2008. [11].

More, HERE.

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MORE MEXICO ARTICLES, BY GLOBAL RESEARCH, HERE

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New Evidence Proves Israel Attacked USS Liberty With Orders to Kill 294 Americans

By Aaron Nelson;Global Research, November 14, 2014

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US Government Sanitizes Vietnam War History

By Marjorie Cohn, Global Research, October 30, 2014, Marjoriecohn.com

For many years after the Vietnam War, we enjoyed the “Vietnam syndrome,” in which US presidents hesitated to launch substantial military attacks on other countries. They feared intense opposition akin to the powerful movement that helped bring an end to the war in Vietnam. But in 1991, at the end of the Gulf War, George H.W. Bush declared,

“By God, we’ve kicked the Vietnam syndrome once and for all!”

With George W. Bush’s wars on Iraq and Afghanistan, and Barack Obama’s drone wars in seven Muslim-majority countries and his escalating wars in Iraq and Syria, we have apparently moved beyond the Vietnam syndrome. By planting disinformation in the public realm, the government has built support for its recent wars, as it did with Vietnam.

Now the Pentagon is planning to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War by launching a $30 million program to rewrite and sanitize its history. Replete with a fancy interactive website, the effort is aimed at teaching schoolchildren a revisionist history of the war. The program is focused on honoring our service members who fought in Vietnam. But conspicuously absent from the website is a description of the antiwar movement, at the heart of which was the GI movement.

Thousands of GIs participated in the antiwar movement.

More, HERE.

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Ottawa Lockdown (22 Oct 2014 - TD Photo)

Prime Minister Steven Harper is using the shooting rampage on Parliament Hill as a justification for imposing broad surveillance and detainment measures that were already being implemented.

Copyright © 2005-2014 GlobalResearch.ca

 

Scandal in Mexico: A murky mortgage

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa Was a Crime of the State - See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Questions surround the purchase of a house owned by the finance minister

Dec 12th 2014

Mexico’s growing crisis: Reforms and democracy, but no rule of law

Nov 13th 2014

To save a promising presidency, Enrique Peña Nieto must tackle crime and corruption

From the print edition

DURING two years in office Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has received sharply contrasting reviews at home and abroad. Foreigners, including The Economist, have praised his structural reforms of the economy, which include an historic measure to open up energy to private investment (see article). Yet polls show that most Mexicans dislike Mr Peña. Among other things, they blame his government for a squeeze on living standards and the interlinked problems of violent crime and corruption. Sadly, recent events have lent support to Mr Peña’s domestic critics.

On November 8th Mexico’s attorney-general announced what almost everyone had already concluded: that 43 students from a teacher-training college in the southern state of Guerrero, who disappeared in the town of Iguala in late September, had been murdered by drug-traffickers after being kidnapped by the local police on the orders of the town’s mayor. Guerrero has been Mexico’s most violent state for centuries. The federal government bears no direct responsibility for these events. But Mexicans see in them a symbol of the failure of Mr Peña’s administration to make security a priority.

Now comes a problem that is uncomfortably close to home. The government had already opted to cancel a contract for a high-speed train that it had hastily awarded to the sole bidder, a consortium of Chinese and Mexican companies including a construction firm from the president’s home state. A local journalist has revealed that the boss of the same firm owns a $7m mansion that is the Peña family’s private residence (see article). The president denies any wrongdoing, but a common thread runs through these events.

Mexico only became a democracy in 2000, when seven decades of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the political machine that raised Mr Peña, were ended by electoral defeat. Unfortunately, democracy did not bring the rule of law to Mexico. Too many in the PRI still see the job of the police and the courts as enforcing political control, rather than investigating mobsters. Corrupt politicians are protected rather than punished. Organised crime and graft both remain a part of everyday life, and neither has been helped by the drugs flowing north to the United States.

More, HERE.

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Victims of Mexico’s drug war

Tracing the missing

Many thousands disappeared in Mexico’s drug war. The government should do more to find them

Mexico’s economy

Jam mañana

A frustrating start to the year

 

May 24th 2014 | MEXICO CITY | From the print edition

SO FAR this year Mexico’s government has resembled one of the country’s many devotees of St Jude, patron saint of lost causes. It has doggedly stuck to a 3.9% 2014 growth forecast, even though its main export market, the United States, has been sluggish, and the twin pillars of its domestic economy—buying and building—have fared even worse.

On May 21st the central bank revised its growth prediction down to 2.3-3.3%, from 3-4% previously. The government was expected finally to follow suit on May 23rd, when first-quarter GDP figures were due to be released. Even so, officials are convinced that within months the benefits of its plans to modernise the economy will start to show up in the numbers.

Mexicans have good reason to be sceptical.

More, HERE.

 

Copyright © The Economist Newspaper Limited 2013. All rights reserved.

The Guardian

 

Snowden voted person of the year


Edward Snowden
In May Edward Snowden flew to Hong Kong where he gave journalists the material which blew the lid on the extent of US digital spying. Photograph: The Guardian/AFP/Getty Images

 

For the second year in a row, a young American whistleblower alarmed at the unfettered and at times cynical deployment of power by the world's foremost superpower has been voted the Guardian's person of the year.

Edward Snowden, who leaked an estimated 200,000 files that exposed the extensive and intrusive nature of phone and internet surveillance and intelligence gathering by the US and its western allies, was the overwhelming choice of more than 2,000 people who voted.

The NSA whistleblower garnered 1,445 votes. In a distant second, from a list of 10 candidates chosen by Guardian writers and editors, came Marco Weber and Sini Saarela, the Greenpeace activists who spearheaded the oil rig protest over Russian Arctic drilling. They received 314 votes. Pope Francis gained 153 votes, narrowly ahead of blogger and anti-poverty campaigner Jack Monroe, who received 144.
Snowden's victory was as decisive as Chelsea Manning's a year earlier.

More, HERE.

© 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.

latimes.com

Click on HERE to get the latest Los Angeles Times News

Company stores trap Mexican farmworkers in cycle of debt

General store

The mom-and-pop monopolies sell to a captive clientele, post no prices and track purchases in dog-eared ledgers. At the end of the harvest, many workers head home owing money.

On a Mexican mega-farm: 'They treated us like slaves'

Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

Tornado touches down in South L.A., damaging 5 homes

Estimate: California's 10-day rainfall totaled 10 trillion gallons

Forecasters: Storm cycle not over; next week will be wet

Chinese money drives growth in El Monte

Construction of a 133-room Hilton Garden Inn is part of an unprecedented wave of Chinese investment in the working-class, mostly Latino city.

U.S. wary of Islamic State fighters training in Libya

Portland police make arrest in school shooting

Taliban kill 12 workers clearing mines in Afghanistan

Spy satellite launched off California's coast

California Chabad group must pay nearly $850,000 for misusing grant

Trash dump discovery points to Mexico's missing students

One of 43 missing Mexican students identified among remains

By This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

December 6, 2014

Nearly 10 weeks after 43 college students in Mexico were kidnapped by police, forensic experts have identified a bone found among remains in a trash dump as belonging to one of the missing men, the school and federal officials said Saturday.

This would be a key clue in discovering the fate of the students, last seen Sept. 26 in the city of Iguala, in Guerrero state,  after a deadly confrontation with police acting on the orders of the mayor, according to the government.

A message on the college's Facebook page said Argentine forensic investigators, whom the families brought to inspect remains, had notified the father of Alexander Mora, one of the students, that a bone had been identified as the young man’s.

A spokesperson for the federal attorney general’s office also confirmed that an identification had been made but would not divulge the name until a news conference Sunday.

More, HERE.

Mexico & the Americas

Climate talks slowed by clashes of rich and poor nations

A Times Investigation

Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

A Times reporter and photographer find that thousands of laborers on Mexico's mega-farms endure harsh conditions and exploitation while supplying produce for American consumers.

SEE THE STORY

Accusations fly as State Bar of California leader fights ouster

More rain, colder weather on tap for Southland

Cooler weather may boost crowds at South L.A.'s first CicLAvia

Obama calls for persistence, patience amid 'deeply rooted' racism

Dianne Feinstein leaving intelligence job amid clash on tactics report

Brian Bennett

Feinstein's tenure as head of the Senate Intelligence Committee is closing amid an acrimonious fight over a project that pits her against the CIA.

For thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the boom in agricultural exports is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship. On Sunday, read the first story in our four-part series "Product of Mexico."

Teenagers plead not guilty in beating death of homeless man in Santee

Six teenagers pleaded not guilty Wednesday to murder and assault charges in an incident in Santee that left one homeless man dead and another severely beaten.

CALIFORNIA

Silicon Valley homeless camp no longer welcome

LAPD seeks help identifying hit-and-run driver who injured child

Beck faults LAPD officers in killing of unarmed man

The three officers violated department rules for using deadly force after a high-speed chase Dec. 13, the chief says. He rejects the officers' claims that they feared for their lives.

Clearing of officer in N.Y. chokehold death sparks protests

Cleveland officer who killed boy, 12, previously deemed unfit for duty

Mandatory DNA collection during arrest is unconstitutional, court says

How L.A. Unified got its iPad contract

11 dead, scores wounded in Grozny terrorist attack

Japanese space explorer to blow crater in asteroid

Barack Obama and Mitch McConnell: Why can't they be friends?

Self-employed find it's not easy to get a mortgage

Tim Logan

Many self-employed borrowers earn more than their salaried peers but have a harder time getting a mortgage. As the ranks of the self-employed grow, that hinders the housing recovery.

Stylists doing time offer fellow inmates a touch-up

Cindy Chang

Women in jail can't ditch their uniforms, but they can change their hair, and they say looking their best does wonders for their self-esteem. But no scissors are allowed.

Obama may lose chief justice with executive act

David G. Savage

By claiming the power to forge ahead based on his executive authority, the president may well lose the one conservative he still really needs.

I5 briefly closed to airlift child, 4, critically hurt in crash

Islamic State militants kill 15 Iraqi police near Syrian border

Supreme Court to debate whether Facebook threats are free speech

Prop. 65's warning signs of chemical hazards may require more detail

Mudslide that closed PCH may only be the beginning

Forecasters warn that rains that have already closed the coastal highway in Ventura County could wash loose mud and rocks in burn areas above Azusa and Glendora.

Mexican activist who fed train-hopping immigrants is slain

A Mexican good Samaritan who dedicated his scarce resources to feeding Central American migrants passing by on La Bestia train was slain this week along with a friend who assisted him, fellow activists said Wednesday.

LAPD arrests about 130 Ferguson protesters in downtown L.A.

The number surpasses arrests in other major U.S. cities on the third night of protests over the grand jury decision in the killing of Michael Brown by a white police officer.

Business

Marijuana legalization backers anxious as costs mount, donors waver

Prop. 47 floods courts with inmate pleas; hundreds already freed

Ferguson grand jury witnesses often cited fear in testifying

Tina Susman

One describes being called a snitch. Some fear upsetting their neighbors. Another says, 'I've seen the Ferguson police do some really awful things.'

Lewis Baltz dies at 69; photographer of stark, postmodern isolation

Israel says it foiled Hamas plot for large-scale attacks

5 killed in suicide attack on British Embassy vehicle in Afghanistan

Cricketer Phillip Hughes dies after being struck by cricket ball

Ferguson staggered by night of violence; scores arrested

The small St. Louis suburb is reeling after hours of fiery looting in the wake of a grand jury decision not to charge a white police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man last summer.SEE THE STORY

Ferguson live updates: Over 80 arrests in area, at least a dozen burned buildings

Dozens have been arrested in the violent aftermath of the grand jury's decision. Bottles and rocks are thrown at police and dozens of buildings burned.

Protests in Los Angeles, Oakland result in arrests

Multiple people were arrested as protesters took to the streets in Los Angeles and Oakland to vent their rage after the grand jury decision in Missouri.

Darren Wilson, recalling shooting, said Michael Brown looked like a demon

Chief Beck warns anybody considering violence in L.A., 'We will make arrests'

Justice Department likely to impose reforms on Ferguson police

Home Depot faces dozens of breach-related lawsuits

Tall freeway spans will be relatively safe in quakes, Caltrans says

Rallies across UC system protest tuition hikes

Winter storm may bring chaos to Thanksgiving travel plans

Hong Kong police arrest dozens, disperse pro-democracy activists

Among those arrested were city legislator Leung Kwok-hung and a junior high school student leader.

Michael Hanline, wrongly convicted in 1978 killing, is freed

Exit sign on 710 Freeway misspells Olympic Boulevard as 'Olimpic'

Huge abuse-case settlement has LAUSD rethinking reforms

Howard Blume, Stephen Ceasar

The $139-million tab in the Mark Berndt case has the superintendent and others considering how the district can better protect students from sexual misconduct by adults.

Pentagon operation name for Islamic State fight inspires criticism

Man shot to death by Long Beach police officer is identified

University of Virginia suspends fraternities after rape allegations

Escaped bighorn sheep that was struck by car near L.A. Zoo dies

Possible far-left comeback sends ripples through German politics

Woman ruled innocent in 1997 slaying; payment for prison time expected

Ninety-eight years later, LAPD takes time to remember one of its own

Copyright 2014

MICHAEL MOORE

 

You Tube

Nixon before resignation and full speech, August 8, 1974

Protests in response to Israel’s assault on Gaza have drawn hundreds — and in some cases thousands — around the world.

 

Megyn Kelly To Dick Cheney: 'History Has Proven' You Were Wrong on Iraq Dick Cheney Kelly File.

 

You Tube

'Citizen Koch' ... the movie they didn't want you to see

Meet Governor(s) Pay-to Pay

 

Charles Baker, GOP nominee for governor in Massachusetts, gave $10,000 to New Jersey's Republican State Committee and hosted a fundraiser for Chris Christie – which happens to be flagrantly illegal, since Baker worked for a venture capital firm that shortly thereafter got a contract to manage New Jersey public pension funds

SPIEGEL ONLINE

Inside TAO: Documents Reveal Top NSA Hacking Unit

By SPIEGEL Staff

 

The article you are reading originally appeared in German in issue 1/2014 (December 30, 2013) of DER SPIEGEL.

 

Targeting Mexico

 

Mexico's Secretariat of Public Security, which was folded into the new National Security Commission at the beginning of 2013, was responsible at the time for the country's police, counterterrorism, prison system and border police. Most of the agency's nearly 20,000 employees worked at its headquarters on Avenida Constituyentes, an important traffic artery in Mexico City. A large share of the Mexican security authorities under the auspices of the Secretariat are supervised from the offices there, making Avenida Constituyentes a one-stop shop for anyone seeking to learn more about the country's security apparatus.

 

More, HERE.

Fresh Leak on US Spying: NSA Accessed Mexican President's Email

By Jens Glüsing, Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

'Royal Concierge': GCHQ Monitors Diplomats' Hotel Bookings

By Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

Quantum Spying: GCHQ Used Fake LinkedIn Pages to Target Engineers

Oil Espionage: How the NSA and GCHQ Spied on OPEC

Belgacom Attack: Britain's GCHQ Hacked Belgian Telecoms Firm

Cyber Attack: Belgians Angered by British Spying

By Gregor Peter Schmitz in Brussels

 

© SPIEGEL ONLINE 2013, All Rights Reserved

Fox News

US intelligence assets in Mexico reportedly tied to murdered DEA agent

SCM's Travel Advisory:


September 11 attacks on World Trade Center by Wikipedia

 

Mexicans are advised to exercise MAXIMUM CAUTION, monitor developments that might affect your safety in the United States because of Hate Crimes. The FBI reports that hate crimes against Latinos rose almost 40 percent between 2003 and 2006, and Hispanic activists say they are being targeted with threats and intimidation.

This is just a recent incident: STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- A rash of recent assaults on Mexican immigrants has heightened tensions in Port Richmond, already on edge following the savage beating of a 25-year-old baker earlier this (April 2010) month.

 

In addition, no matter what your nationality the US in under permanent risk of terrorism. Visitors could be caught up in attacks targeted at American, British, Canadian, Australian citizens, others. Terrorists may attack official or civilian targets. Crime rates are higher in the larger cities, such as New York, Los Angeles and Chicago.

 

Many parts of the United States are subject to different natural hazards, including earthquakes, fires or wildfires, floods, extreme heat, hurricanes, landslides and debris flow (mudslides), thunderstorms and lightning, tornadoes, tsunamis, volcanoes (Hawaii, Alaska and Pacific Northwest), winter storms (freezing rain, heavy snow and blizzards) and extreme cold.

 

Tourists are often targeted for petty crimes such as pick-pocketing and theft, particularly on public transport. It is recommended that before visiting your destination point, Google it and write NAME OF CITY TO BE VISITED, then "crime, areas to be avoided & gang activities" to determine your level of threat.  

Come Back Alive, a site dedicated to Dangerous Countries writes on quote: 

"There are more than 200 million guns in the possession of Americans. Most violent acts in the States are the result of robberies, domestic disputes and drug-related violence.

 

Terrorist acts, ranging from the killing of abortionist doctors to the bombing of the World Trade Center, are highly publicized but not considered a real threat to travelers. The threat of robbery or violent crime in inner cities and some tourist areas is real and should be taken seriously. Travel in America is considered safe (by .. Americans), and danger is confined to random violence and inner cities.

 

Those seeking adventure can find it in a New Orleans bar at five in the morning or strolling through South Central L.A. after midnight." .. 

TRAVEL ADVISORY: The Southern Poverty Law Center counted 932 active hate groups in the United States in 2009. Only organizations and their chapters known to be active during 2009 are included. More, HERE.

Oct. 29, 2009 Washington Post: Obama signs hate crimes law

You Tube

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HATE CRIMES

RACISM AND ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION, by ABC News

MEXICAN HATE RALLY

The New Sport: Latino Hate Crime, ABC News

Mexican beaten by 3 racist Blacks on Staten Island, New York

US Border Patrol Agent Shoots Dead Mexican Teen on Mexican Soil

Border agent details immigrant abuse

Discrimination Against Latinos

American Heritage- KKK Lynching

 

Redneck Attacks Mexican flag

 

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TERRORISM, DRUGS

New report exposes CIA torture & rendition by Nick Harper

MUST-READ Book: Cocaine Politics by Peter Dale Scott

Drugs and the Economy - Peter Dale Scott

Gary Webb on C.I.A. Trafficking of Cocaine

CIA Torture Jet crashed with 4 Tons of COCAINE

Former LA Police Officer Mike Ruppert Confronts CIA Director

'I don't think drug trafficking will ever be stopped': Inside the world of the U.S. agent who went undercover with the cartels:

Mail Online, UK

Celerino Castillo, by Wikipedia

Powderburns

Marijuana legalization wins majority support in poll: Los Angeles Times

Marijuana, Officially Legal in Colorado

In 2006, former Mexican president Felipe Calderón launched a massive crackdown against drug trafficking organizations, in conjunction with the United States. Since then, more than 40,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence: Council On

Foreign Relations

Washington State Gears Up for Marijuana Industry: Voice of America

Marijuana Legalization Canada: Liberal Party Lays Out Detailed Economic Plan For Pot: The Huffington Post, Canada

England Wants To Legalize Marijuana Through Cannabis Drug Reform: Inquisitr. Ltd.

More HERE.

A change of scenery by Washington Post

U.S. citizens traveling internationally in 2012, by destination

A change of scenery
Source: Office of Travel and Tourism Industries, Commerce Department. The Washington Post. Published on May 24, 2013

Image Credit

Mexico Travel Warning

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling to certain places in Mexico due to threats to safety and security posed by organized criminal groups in the country.

U.S. citizens have been the target of violent crimes, such as kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery by organized criminal groups in various Mexican states.  For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, which can vary, travelers should reference the state-by-state assessments further below.  This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

General Conditions: 

Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year for study, tourism, and business, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day.  The Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations, and there is no evidence that organized criminal groups have targeted U.S. visitors or residents based on their nationality.  Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that are reported in the border region or in areas along major trafficking routes. 

Nevertheless, U.S. travelers should be aware that the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter organized criminal groups that engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico.  The groups themselves are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity.  Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur anywhere.  U.S. citizens have fallen victim to criminal activity, including homicide, gun battles, kidnapping, carjacking, and highway robbery.  While many of those killed in organized crime-related violence have themselves been involved in criminal activity, innocent persons have also been killed.  The number of U.S. citizens reported to the Department of State as murdered in Mexico was 71 in 2012 and 81 in 2013. 

Gun battles between rival criminal organizations or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico.  Gun battles have occurred in broad daylight on streets and in other public venues, such as restaurants and clubs.  During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily prevented from leaving the area. Criminal organizations have used stolen cars, buses, and trucks to create roadblocks on major thoroughfares, preventing the military and police from responding to criminal activity. The location and timing of future armed engagements is unpredictable.  We recommend that you defer travel to the areas specifically identified in this Travel Warning and exercise extreme caution when traveling throughout the other areas for which advisories are in effect.

The number of kidnappings throughout Mexico is of particular concern and appears to be on the rise.  According to statistics published by the Mexican Secretaria de Gobernacion (SEGOB), in 2013 kidnappings nationwide increased 20 percent over the previous year.  While kidnappings can occur anywhere, according to SEGOB, during this timeframe, the states with the highest numbers of kidnappings were Tamaulipas, Guerrero, Michoacán, Estado de Mexico, and Morelos.

Additionally, according to a widely publicized study by the agency responsible for national statistics (INEGI, the National Institute of Statistics and Geography), Mexico suffered an estimated 105,682 kidnappings in 2012; only 1,317 were reported to the police.  Police have been implicated in some of these incidents.  Both local and expatriate communities have been victimized.  Nearly 70 kidnappings of U.S. citizens were reported to the U.S. Embassy and consulates in Mexico between January and June of 2014.

U.S. citizens are encouraged to lower their personal profiles and to avoid displaying indicators of wealth such as expensive or expensive-looking jewelry, watches, or cameras.  U.S. citizens are encouraged to maintain awareness of their surroundings and avoid situations in which they may be isolated or stand out as potential victims.

Kidnappings in Mexico have included traditional, "express," and "virtual" kidnappings. Victims of traditional kidnappings are physically abducted and held captive until a ransom is paid for release.  "Express" kidnappings are those in which a victim is abducted for a short time and forced to withdraw money, usually from an ATM, then released.  A "virtual" kidnapping is an extortion-by-deception scheme wherein a victim is contacted by phone and convinced to isolate themselves from family and friends until a ransom is paid.  The victim is coerced (by threat of violence) to remain isolated and to provide phone numbers for the victim's family or loved ones.  The victim's family is then contacted and a ransom for the "kidnapped" extracted.  Recently, some travelers to Mexico staying at hotels as guests have been targets of such "virtual" kidnapping schemes.

Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments.  U.S. government personnel are specifically prohibited from patronizing these establishments in the states of Coahuila, Durango, Zacatecas, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosi, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas.

Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the border region, and U.S. citizens have been murdered in such incidents.  Most victims who complied with carjackers' demands have reported that they were not physically harmed.

Carjackers have shot at vehicles that have attempted to flee.  Incidents have occurred during the day and at night, and carjackers have used a variety of techniques, including roadblocks, bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop, and running vehicles off the road at high speeds.  There are indications that criminals target newer and larger vehicles, especially dark-colored SUVs.  However, even drivers of old sedans and buses coming from the United States have been targeted.  While violent incidents can occur anywhere and at any time, they most frequently occur at night and on isolated roads.  To reduce risk when traveling by road, we strongly urge you to travel between cities throughout Mexico only during daylight hours, to avoid isolated roads, and to use toll roads ("cuotas") whenever possible. 

The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat organized criminal groups.  U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways by car or bus may encounter government checkpoints, staffed by military or law enforcement personnel.  In some places, criminal organizations have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and have killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them.  You should cooperate at all checkpoints. 

The Department imposes restrictions on U.S. government employees' travel in Mexico.  Since July 2010, USG employees are prohibited from driving on non-official travel from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior of Mexico or Central America.  One exception is that personal travel by motor vehicle is permitted on Highway 15 toll road between Hermosillo and Nogales during daylight hours.

U.S. government personnel and their families are prohibited from personal travel to all areas to which it is advised to "defer non-essential travel".  When travel for official purposes is essential, it is conducted with extensive security precautions.  U.S. government personnel and their families are allowed to travel for personal reasons to the areas where no advisory is in effect or where the advisory is to exercise caution.  While the general public is not forbidden from visiting places categorized under "defer non-essential travel," U.S. government personnel will not be able to respond quickly to an emergency situation in those areas due to security precautions that must be taken by U.S. government personnel to travel to those areas. 

For more information on road safety and crime along Mexico's roadways, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information

State-by-State Assessment: 

Below is a state-by-state assessment of security conditions throughout Mexico.  Travelers should be mindful that even if no advisories are in effect for a given state, crime and violence can still occur.  For general information about travel and other conditions in Mexico, see our Country Specific Information.

More, HERE

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The New York Times

From Frommer's

Introduction to Mexico
The Best Cultural Experiences
The Best Beach Vacations
The Best Active Vacations
The Best Places to Get Away from It All
Getting There
Getting Around
Fast Facts
In One Week
In Two Weeks

MEXICO POPULAR DESTINATIONS 

See All 37 Destinations

Acapulco

Baja California

Cabo San Lucas

Campeche

Cancun

Chichen Itza

Colima

Mexico City

Yucatan Peninsula

MORE MEXICO TRAVEL, HERE.

© 2013 The New York Times Company

The Naturalization Process and Current Trends in Immigration in the United States: By Gender, By Age and By Marital Status

In 2011, the total number of persons naturalizing was 694,193. The leading countries of birth of new citizens were Mexico (94,783), India (45,985), the Philippines (42,520), the People's Republic of China (32,864), and Colombia (22,693). The largest number of persons naturalizing lived in California (151,183), Florida (87,309), and New York (76,603).

Historical trends have shown that the average number of persons that are naturalized annually has increased from less than 120,000 during the 1950s and 1960s to 210,000 during the 1980s, to 500,000 during the 1990s, and to 680,000 between 2000 and 2009. Naturalizations rose sharply during the mid-1990s because of various factors that include: 1) the 2.7 million undocumented immigrants legalized under the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 making them eligible for citizenship; 2) legislative efforts to restrict public benefits for non-citizens; and 3) the implementation of a mandatory program requiring replacement of permanent resident cards issued before 1977.

More, HERE.

 

Information submitted by Cooper Brimm, American Immigration Center

16 Ways to Get Through the Airport Faster

With airports that seem busier than ever, airline staffing reductions creating longer lines at check-in and airport security wait times that can be entirely unpredictable, these days the old airport "two-hour" rule often leaves just minutes to spare to buy a magazine, grab a snack or hustle your kids into the bathroom. Saving a few extra minutes here and there along the way can add up in your favor; here are 16 tips to get you from your front door to your seat on the plane as quickly and painlessly as possible -- as well as some ideas to keep you moving no matter what is going on with your flight.

More, HERE

© 2013 The Independent Traveler, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

15 Travel Tips to Get Through TSA Security


The savviest of travelers understand the security requirements and plan ahead. In the United States, airport security is run by the Transportation Security Administration, a division of the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees border security as well as technological research, response to national disasters and terrorism, and intelligence analysis.

 

These tips reflect TSA policies as of November 2012. And for students enrolled in a homeland security program, knowing this information is vital and applicable to your future career.

 

More, HERE.

 

© 2013, Master of Homeland Security

COMMUNITY NEWS


La Naval
Insurgentes Sur 373,
Esquina con Michoacán
Col. Exhipódromo Condesa
Tel. 55 84 3500. Servicio a Domicilio: 5584-3144
e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
CATAS: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Panadería La Espiga


INSURGENTES SUR 455, HIPODROMO CONDESA, CUAUHTEMOC, C.P. 06170, DF. Tel: (55)5564-7763

Ir al metro Chilpancingo es una de mis aventuras favoritas porque puedo visitar la panadería La Espiga. Este lugar lleva más de veinte años en el mismo lugar y tiene cosas deliciosas que ofrecer. Su tamaño es enorme, y dentro puedes encontrar comida, refrescos y bebidas, postres, entre otras cosas. El primer pasillo tiene papas y comida chatarra que puedes consumir. El segundo pasillo tiene todos los refrescos y las aguas al tiempo, en el fondo podrás encontrar los refrigeradores que tienen los refrescos y aguas frías, así como hielo. Más, AQUI.

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Autos con 15 Años de Antiguedad Dejarán de Circular en el D. F. Dos Veces a la Semana

http://www.solucionpolitica.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/hoy-no-circula.jpg

CREDITO DE LA IMAGEN: SOLUCION POLITICA

 

Cars Older than 15 Years will not circulate twice a Week
Tanya Müller García
Tanya Muller García, Secretaria del Medio Ambiente del Distrito Federal

 

Mexico City's Environment Secretariat

HOY NO CIRCULA

New Program of (Your Car) Does not Circulate in Mexico City. More information, HERE by Wikipedia

S P E C I A L   A N N O U N C E M E N T
Olivier Tschumi
Olivier Tschumi, a Swiss citizen, relocated to Mexico 22 years ago. He was kidnapped while jogging with his two dogs in a park north of Cuernavaca in the morning of December 19, 2010. A ransom was paid to the kidnappers on December 21 of same year, but Olivier continues to be in captivity to this date. Authorities have no leads to the kidnappers.

Security Corner in Mexico has been requested by Mr. Tschumi's family in Switzerland to have this information available to our readers in the event you happen to know or hear of Olivier's whereabouts. The Mexican Federal Attorney General's Office (PGR) is offering $5 million pesos as a reward to anybody providing information that will lead to the whereabouts of Mr. Tschumi

If you have any information, please write to Olivier's sister ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). Olivier has a 12-year old waiting to hear from you too. More information, in Spanish HERE
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Olivier Tschumi, citoyen suisse, s'est installé au Mexique il y a 22 ans. Au matin du 19 décembre 2010,  Il a été enlevé  lors d'un jogging avec ses deux chiens dans une forêt au nord de Cuernavaca. Une rançon a été payée selon les exigences des ravisseurs le 21 décembre de la même année. Olivier n'a pas été libéré, il a disparu depuis ce jour. L'enquête, menée par les  autorités mexicaines piétine.  Désespérée, la famille Tschumi en Suisse implore l'aide de tout le monde pour retrouver Olivier. Toute information concernant les ravisseurs et  sa localisation sera utile et  bienvenue. La famille d'Olivier a grand besoin de votre aide et vous remercie.

Le Bureau du procureur général fédéral mexicain offre $ 5.000.000 pesos en récompense à qui fournira des informations conduisant à retrouver Monsieur Tschumi. Si vous avez des informations, s'il vous plaît écrivez à la sœur d'Olivier, Email:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Olivier a une fille de 12 ans qui espère retrouver son papa grâce à votre aide! Plus d'informations en espagnol ICI


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Culture of Safe Travel, Crime & Loss Prevention

 

VIDEOS

 

INTRODUCTION (English language) 

INTRODUCCION A ESQUINA DE LA SEGURIDAD


PREVENTING KIDNAPPING EXPRESS IN MEXICO CITY

MEXICO CITY SUBWAY SYSTEM, SAFE, EFFICIENT, INEXPENSIVE


WORDS OF ADVISE FROM SUBWAY SECURITY PERSONNEL

 

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Mexico City Hash House Harriers

 

INTERNATIONAL DRINKING Jarra CLUB WITH A RUNNING PROBLEM

www.mchhh.com

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www.mchhh.com

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SOCIAL SERVICES

 

Cuernavaca's Center for Happy Sr. Citizens, contributing to the enhancement of life quality. Monday to Friday: 8AM to 14:00 hrs. Among other courses specially designed for the elderly: literature, history, philosophy, IT, English, Spanish, artistic workshops: music, painting, cuisine, manual art; sports and entertainment: dancing, zumba, danzon, yoga, aqua-aerobics, reading. Emotions' handling, conferences, legal advise for inheritance, tanatology.

More information: Río Amacuzac 435, Col. Vistahermosa, tels. (01- 777) 221-6250(01- 777) 221-6250 (01- 777) 221-6250Contact person: Alejandra Morales Leija

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American Benevolent Society

 

American Benevolent Society Newsletter by American_Benevolent

Paseo de la Reforma 1870-201 Lomas de Chapultepec, Miguel Hidalgo. Mexico, D.F. 11000 Mexico

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New "HOY NO CIRCULA" rules go into effect Tuesday, July 1, 2014‏

 

Here's an explanation of how the new program "hoy no circula" works, starting TUESDAY, July 1st

 

If you have any information that is different from this PLEASE let us know right away so we can send it out. Brand new vehicles that have the hologram 00 are able to drive for two years, the car will have to update the hologram  at the expiration date and be inspected . You have two months after the expiration date to renew the hologram (have the car inspected).
Hologram 0, if your vehicle does not pass the 00 you will be given the hologram 0.  You can still drive everyday of the month, but instead of the two years permit, the expiration is set for six months, then you will have to renew the hologram. For information on the dates of the renewal, the link of the government will be posted at the end of the mail.
Hologram 1, this hologram is usually for vehicles between 9 and 15 years of usage. the vehicles with the hologram number 1 will not be able to circulate two Saturdays a month and one day on midweek. (the Saturday depends on the license plate of the car, see the government link for more details) and one day on midweek that also depends on the license plate of the car.

And there will be the new hologram 2.

According to the news of El Universal vehicles with the hologram number 2 that are over 15 years in circulation will not be able to circulate any Saturday of the month and also one day midweek.

 

It seems that the government is willing to change the hologram 2 for the hologram 1 if the vehicles pass the regulation test. This regulation will start on Tuesday July 1st. of 2014.  For more details here is the link of the news. And here is the link for the government program "Hoy no circula"

Talking history: The American Benevolent Society turns 140 by Catherine Dunn, Insidemex

History

CNN

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

© 2014 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Oprima ESTE ENLACE electrónico para ver las noticias actualizadas de México de CNN en Español de esta fecha

IPN regresa a clases: Alumnos entregan instalaciones

Cuatro planteles aún quedan pendientes y el plazo para devolverlos es este lunes, mismo día en que tres escuelas volverán a clases Ir a la nota

En el IPN hay acuerdos pero aún no regreso a clases

Director propone clases en el IPN para el 7 de enero

Los 43 normalistas

Bloqueo a Autopista del Sol por caso Ayotzinapa 2011

El plan de seguridad de Peña compite contra el reloj

'Nobel eran oportunidad para hablar de Ayotzinapa' video

Artistas lanzan "#YaMeCansé, por eso propongo"

Videgaray y su casa en Malinalco generan polémica

El secretario de Hacienda adquirió el inmueble a través de H&G SA, propiedad de Juan Armando Hinojosa, constructor de la casa de Las Lomas Ir a la nota

Explicación de la casa de Rivera deja dudas: Dresser

OPINIÓN: La 'colina del perro y la 'casa blanca'

Últimas noticias

¿Los animales van al cielo? La pregunta al Vaticano

Jolie se reune con ejecutiva de Sony tras 'hackeo'

Cuatro heridos deja tiroteo cerca de una escuela en EU

Aerolíneas darán descuentos de hasta 60% para ir a Guerrero CNNExpansión

Noruega se 'topa' con una película perdida de Disney

El Dow Jones tiene su peor semana en tres años CNNExpansión

Hillary Clinton recibe premio de la 'app' Grindr

OPINIÓN: ¿Por quién votar en la elecciones de 2015?

Brasileño confiesa haber matado a 39 mujeres, sin remordimiento

El ébola 'cancela' la Navidad en Sierra Leona

Prepárate para la última lluvia de estrellas de 2014

Facebook dice no al botón de 'no me gusta'

¿Por qué el ataque cibernético a Sony fue tan fácil?

Ejecutivos de Sony hacen comentarios raciales sobre Obama

Manifestantes alistan una gran protesta racial en EU

Video

Éxodo: entre la Biblia y la realidadVideo

Google cerrará su sitio de noticias en EspañaVideo

Tres heridos deja tiroteo en Portland, Oregon Video

2014, el año de la 'selfie'Video

Robo informático en Sony Video

El día de la Virgen de GuadalupeVideo

Un tributo a la Virgen de GuadalupeVideo

¿Será este el remedio contra la sequía?Video

En México recogen firmas por AyotzinapaVideo

El verdadero poder de ISISVideo

Nacional

IPN regresa a clases: Alumnos entregan instalaciones

Bloqueo de 3 horas por el caso Aytozinapa de 2011

Peña se reunirá con Obama el 6 de enero en EU

Radiografía de los católicos mexicanos en 7 claves

Videgaray también compra casa a dueño de Grupo Higa

Meteorológico pronostica nieve para norte de México

SRE pide a Venezuela reporte de aeronaves derribadas

'SCJN responderá a llamado de justicia': Silva Meza

198 escuelas cerradas en Acapulco por la inseguridad

El alcoholímetro hará 'Guadalupe-Reyes' las 24 horas

Mundo

ISIS justifica el sexo con niñas cautivas

Los miembros de ISIS pueden tener sexo con las mujeres cautivas, incluso con niñas prepúberes, según detalla un documento del grupo  Ir a la nota

¿En verdad detuvieron a la esposa del líder de ISIS?

Irán planea combatir a ISIS en Iraq: Pentágono

ISIS justifica el sexo con mujeres y niñas cautivas

Un tiroteo en Portland deja cuatro heridosVideo

Homicidio, muerte del niño que jugaba con arma falsa

Defensores del porno protestan en Londres

Un palestino ataca con ácido a una familia judía

Boston desentierra un 'secreto' de hace dos siglos

Manifestantes alistan una gran protesta racial en EU

Londres registra un cierre en su espacio aéreo

Un brasileño confiesa haber matado a 39 mujeres

Ejecutiva renuncia por el 'escándalo de las nueces'

© 2006 Derechos Reservados Expansión, S.A. DE C.V.

El Universal has no official political affiilation and is the most read newspaper in Mexico

Oprima AQUI para ver noticias actualizadas del periódico El Universal

Videgaray | Levanta polémica entre partidos

Exigen PAN, PRD y MC aclarar compra de casa a Grupo Higa, empresa que vendió 'la casa blanca'

Nación | "Iguala, una alerta para América"

Necesario fortalecer Estado de derecho: José Miguel Insulza, secretario general de la OEA

Nación

"Iguala, una alerta para América"

México enfrenta un recrudecimiento de la criminalidad y los hechos de Guerrero son "una llamada de atención" a todo el continente para enfrentar a las redes del crimen organizado, reconoce el secretario general de la OEA

Actúa INE con cautela en Guerrero: Córdova

Pleno respeto a derechos, ofrece jefe del Ejecutivo

El presidente Enrique Peña Nieto anunció una batería de acciones, con apoyo de expertos y de la sociedad civil, para garantizar y fortalecer la defensa y protección de los derechos humanos de los mexicanos

Vivía México engañosa realidad: ómbudsman

Editorial EL UNIVERSAL El arma de los débiles

Nación

Desata casa de Videgaray polémica en partidos

Legisladores del PAN, PRD y Movimiento Ciudadano en el Congreso criticaron la residencia de 7.5 mdp que compró el secretario de Hacienda, al Grupo Higa, constructor de la "casa blanca", y exigieron se investigue "a fondo"

Reformas afectaron intereses, acusa Videgaray

Transparencia Mexicana: se duda de la clase política

Salvador García Soto El secretario tocado

Mario Melgar-Adalid La casa de Malinalco

Entérate También Videgaray compró casa a Higa: WSJ

"Somos una Normal masacrada"

Al menos 3 mil estudiantes de la Escuela Normal Rural de Ayotzinapa e integrantes de la CETEG marcharon en memoria de los normalistas caídos hace tres años durante el desalojo en la Autopista del Sol

También buscan en Iguala a Los Otros Desaparecidos

Fotogalería Marchan a tres años de desalojo en Autopista del Sol

Video Flores por Ayotzinapa

Video Nueva marcha en Guerrero por Ayotzinapa

De no existir previa autorización, queda expresamente prohibida la publicación, retransmisión, edición y cualquier otro uso de los contenidos de El Universal



Proceso is a weekly magazine, renowned for its left-wing journalism

Oprima AQUI para ver las noticias actualizadas de la revista Proceso de esta fecha

Casa de Videgaray fortalece posible conflicto de intereses de Peña: The Economist

Ola de burlas en redes sociales sobre mansión de Videgaray

MÉXICO, D.F., (proceso.com.mx).- Usuarios de redes sociales ironizaron sobre la mansión que el secretario de Hacienda, Luis Videgaray, compró a Grupo Higa, contratista del gobierno …

“Este gobierno ha afectado intereses”, responde Videgaray frente a nuevo escándalo

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- El secretario de Hacienda, Luis Videgaray Caso, dijo que está dispuesto a que se realice una investigación independiente del gobierno sobre la …

Las casas de Angélica Rivera y Luis Videgaray “son moches”: AMLO

“¡Vivos se los llevaron, vivos los queremos!”, claman feligreses en misa guadalupana

Instalan ofrenda por desaparecidos en Palacio Nacional

Joven que protestó por Ayotzinapa en entrega del Nobel será encarcelado de manera preventiva

México D.F., (apro).- Adán Cortés Salas, el estudiante mexicano que irrumpió en la ceremonia de entrega del Premio Nobel de la Paz con la bandera …

Nacional

Gobierno de EU confisca más de un millón de dólares a funcionario de Tamaulipas

WASHINGTON (proceso.com.mx).- El gobierno de Estados Unidos anunció la …

Anuncia la Casa Blanca, visita de Peña Nieto a Obama

WASHINGTON (proceso.com.mx).- La Casa Blanca anunció que el próximo …

Anuncian descuentos en vuelos y autopistas para reactivar economía de Guerrero

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- El gobierno de Enrique Peña Nieto …

Estados

Conflicto en San Miguel Canoa: “si agreden, vamos a defendernos”, advierten pobladores

PUEBLA, Pue. (apro).- Decenas de granaderos irrumpieron hoy en …

Penalizarán en Chihuahua difusión de imágenes violentas o sexuales

CHIHUAHUA, Chih. (apro).- El Congreso local reformó el artículo …

Amagan con bloquear pozos para que se destituya a Romero Deschamps

MONTERREY, N.L. (apro).- Petroleros disidentes anunciaron que emprenderán medidas …

CHILPANCINGO, Gro. (apro).- Normalistas de Ayotzinapa, padres de los 42 estudiantes desaparecidos y miembros del magisterio disidente desafiaron al gobierno de Enrique Peña Nieto y bloquearon durante más de cuatro horas la Autopista del Sol para seguir exigiendo justicia. Al respecto, …

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- 74 días después, dividida la comunidad estudiantil en el balance de lo conseguido, en el Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN) terminó oficialmente el paro de labores con la entrega de 37 de los 41 planteles que desde el …

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- El precio de la mezcla mexicana sigue tocando fondo: Este viernes se cotizó en 51.62 dólares por barril, el nivel más bajo desde mayo del 2009, año de la crisis económica mundial. Dicho costo también está lejos de …

Omisiones y corrupción desde el Estado, provocaron Tlatlaya y Ayotzinapa: CNDH

MÉXICO, D.F. (proceso.com.mx).- En prácticamente su estreno como ombudsman nacional, Luis Raúl González reclamó las omisiones y la corrupción que desde el Estado provocaron las …

“Mamá Rosa” abrió un nuevo albergue, denuncia Estrada Juárez

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Rosa Verduzco, Mamá Rosa, la fundadora del albergue La Gran Familia, está de regreso. En esta ocasión, habilitó su casa como posada …

Empresas perdieron 110 mil mdp por la inseguridad en 2013: Inegi

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).— La inseguridad en el país no sólo afecta al tejido social, también a la economía. Sólo en el 2013, las empresas que …

PROCESO 1988
The Mexican government, welcomed as a partner of the Canadian and U.S. governments in continental economic development and security, also happens to partner in the slaughter of its own people. The murders and disappearances of the students from the Rural Normal “Raúl Isidro Burgos,” of Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, Mexico on September 26, 2014 in Iguala, was a crime of the state, as hundreds of thousands of Mexicans have claimed in their protests.
The governmental investigation that followed the September 2014 attack on these students has been deliberately incompetent and not aimed at getting to the roots of the crime that are, in fact, the tangled web of state-drug gang corruption and the state’s dirty war in defense of the neoliberal transformation of Mexico. The investigation has been staged, quite ineffectively, as a public relations operation to calm foreign investors and to cool protests, efforts that have completely failed within Mexico. By claiming that the blame was at the local level (the corrupt collusion of a local mayor and his avaricious wife with a brutal cartel) the national government seeks to present itself as the defender of justice.
But as Luis Hernández Navarro shows in his article “La matanza de Iguala y el Ejército” (The Iguala Massacre and the Army), there is—and has long been—a deep entanglement between the army, the local government of Iguala, and drug production. Guerrero  accounts for more than 60% of the Mexican production of poppies and opium gum for making heroin, and the cities of Iguala and Chilpancingo are key centers for its storage and transportation.
- See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa Was a Crime of the State

- See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Edición 1988; 6 de Diciembre, 2014

Reporte Especial

REPORTE ESPECIAL


6 de diciembre de 2014
Hacia afuera, el dolor desgarra. En lo íntimo, el dolor es retrospección, reflexión, evocación creativa. Hoy Proceso vive el dolor de la pérdida que no tiene vuelta. Con la muerte de Vicente Leñero perdemos en Proceso –como la parte …

Vicente, Vicente


6 de diciembre de 2014
Como director de Excélsior, Julio Scherer García invitó en 1972 a Vicente Leñero a colaborar con él y le encargó la conducción de Revista de Revistas. Desde ese momento establecieron una estrecha relación profesional y amistosa. Pieza clave en …

La amistad*


6 de diciembre de 2014
Años después del 8 de julio de 1976, con Los periodistas en las librerías, Vicente Leñero me contó de su ánimo en la asamblea. Pensaba que me había adelantado a los acontecimientos al ponerme de pie y anunciar el …

El atentado contra “Excélsior” Relación de los hechos


6 de diciembre de 2014
(Esta es una crónica colectiva, no sólo un testimonio personal) El golpe contra el Excélsior de Julio Scherer García, orquestado desde las más altas esferas del poder, era silenciado por unos medios nacionales que más bien se unían a …

La dignidad*


6 de diciembre de 2014
Al abandonar el edificio de Excélsior, en Reforma 18, me sentí perro sin dueño. Sin saber qué hacer con mi cuerpo, no había más mundo que el mundo interior. Algo me decía que mi comportamiento en la asamblea que …

El periodismo no está para resolver las crisis; está para decirlas*


6 de diciembre de 2014
Hace 20 años Vicente Leñero recibió el Premio Manuel Buendía a la Trayectoria Periodística 1994, en una ceremonia efectuada el 30 de mayo en el Paraninfo de la Universidad de Guadalajara. Como maestro que era, el subdirector de Proceso …

La invitación Un relato sin ficción


6 de diciembre de 2014
En esta crónica, publicada el 9 de mayo de 1988 y de la cual presentamos extractos fundamentales, Vicente Leñero cuenta cómo a principios de ese año electoral los tentáculos del poder priista lo alcanzaron y lo subieron al carro …

¿Cómo “trascender” a Julio Scherer?*


6 de diciembre de 2014
En el libro Periodismo de emergencia publicado por la editorial Debate, Vicente Leñero reconstruye el día en el que Carlos Salinas de Gortari, entonces candidato a la Presidencia de la República, le pregunta: “¿Cómo podría Proceso trascender a Julio …

Vicente Leñero, mi amigo


6 de diciembre de 2014
Para las dos Estelas, Eugenia, Isabel y Mariana, por todo lo que lo amamos. El siguiente texto del poeta y colaborador de Proceso Javier Sicilia ahonda en una relación tan entrañable como enriquecedora: la que mantuvieron él y Vicente …

Religión

La Iglesia y Slim recuperan la Plaza Mariana


6 de diciembre de 2014
En un tramposo vaivén legal, la Plaza Mariana –el mall religioso-comercial aledaño a la Basílica– vuelve a las manos de quienes aparentemente habían perdido ese multimillonario negocio. Con donaciones, recuperaciones y nuevas donaciones, el enorme terreno donde se edificó …

Diplomacia

La doplomacia mexicana con dos patrias


6 de diciembre de 2014
Érica Cervantes Albarrán tiene un cargo clave en la diplomacia mexicana: Dirige la oficina jurídica de la PGR en Europa. Sin embargo –y contra la ley–, tiene dos nacionalidades: la española y la mexicana, lo cual podría significar un …

Internacional

Ayotzinapa muestra la derrota del Estado


6 de diciembre de 2014
El colombiano Gustavo Duncan terminó de escribir su libro sobre el dominio político del narcotráfico antes de que ocurriera la tragedia de Ayotzinapa. Aun así en su texto se explica lo ocurrido: Se habla de la colusión del crimen …

“Matar al mensajero”


6 de diciembre de 2014
En agosto de 1996 Gary Webb, entonces reportero del San José Mercury News, reveló la complicidad de la CIA en la inundación de crack que una década antes padeció la costa oeste de Estados Unidos y cuyas ganancias sirvieron …

Cuando prensa y poder caminan de la mano


6 de diciembre de 2014
NUEVA YORK.- La guerra contra las drogas en Estados Unidos y en México ha fracasado porque el crimen organizado y el poder oficial “no pueden separarse”. Por ello en ambos países el narcotráfico se ha convertido en una compleja …

Más, AQUI.
PROCESO 1987

Edición 1987; 29 de Noviembre, 2014

PROCESO-1986
Edición 1986; 22 de Noviembre, 2014

PROCESO 1985

Edición 1985; 15 de Noviembre, 2014

© 2013 Proceso

 

 

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 17 December 2014 11:56
 
Your Complete Guide To Obama's Immigration Executive Action; Woman With Gun Arrested Outside White House; Tens Of Thousands March In Mexico Over Students; Clashes Erupt Over Mexico's Missing; Anatomy Of A Mexican Student Massacre: J. McGahan
Sunday, 02 November 2014 07:57

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The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners - Public Service

For a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper or news site through the use of its journalistic resources, including the use of stories, editorials, cartoons, photographs, graphics, videos, databases, multimedia or interactive presentations or other visual material, a gold medal. Awarded to The Washington Post for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security. and Awarded to The Guardian US for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, helping through aggressive reporting to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.

Finalists also nominated as a finalist in this category was Newsday, Long Island, N.Y., for its use of in-depth reporting and digital tools to expose shootings, beatings and other concealed misconduct by some Long Island police officers, leading to the formation of a grand jury and an official review of police accountability.

-------------------------------

INTERNATIONAL

Key questions and answers about Obama's executive action.

Overhaul shields 4 million from deportation
David Nakamura

The president sought to convince Americans that his plans to change immigration laws were well within the precedent set by other administrations and did not amount to amnesty.

The Fix: Obama channels 2008 self

Obama’s evolution on issue

Why networks didn’t air speech
Illegal crossings along the Rio Grande have slowed dramatically since an overwhelming surge of immigrants had state and federal agents scrambling to secure the border earlier this year. Texas leaders still don't want their ground troops to leave just yet.
The total number of immigrants living in the United States illegally hasn't changed much since 2009, but where they are choosing to settle, according to a new report from the nonprofit Pew Research Center.

Woman with gun arrested outside White House
By Carol Leonnig November 20, 2014

A Michigan woman was arrested by Secret Service officers after she was seen walking along the White House’s north fence with a handgun at about 8 p.m. Thursday, authorities said.

Secret Service plainclothes officers noticed a woman with a holster near Pennsylvania Avenue around the perimeter of the fence and notified uniform division officers, who then arrested her for having an unregistered 9 mm handgun in her holster, said Ed Donovan, the spokesman for the Secret Service.

More, HERE.

Robert Costa

Bickering could threaten the GOP’s mission to appeal to a broader electorate and maintain stable governance

Immigration plan’s winners and losers

Hours before the speech, millions of illegal immigrants waited to see how the president’s plan would affect their personal lives.

In one Mexican town, divided families look north

Morning Mix

Stories from all over

How a Russian Web site peers into your home, even your baby's room

People who don’t create passwords for Web cams and baby monitors are easy prey for these hackers.

Conservatives rebel against donor Sheldon Adelson’s gambling agenda

Conservatives rebel against donor Sheldon Adelson’s gambling agenda

The casino magnate wants to ban Internet gambling, but some in the GOP say that violates states’ rights.

As Ferguson decision nears, St. Louis area teens fear eruption of civil unrest

As Ferguson decision nears, St. Louis area teens fear eruption of civil unrest

Some schools gave out homework packets in case of closings in the aftermath of the announcement.

Officer Darren Wilson unlikely to return to job

More women are freezing their eggs, hoping to buy time before having kids

More women are freezing their eggs, hoping to buy time before having kids

Among urban women in their 30s, egg freezing is trending. But the choice is hardly a perfect one.

Why are China and Thailand scared of the new ‘Hunger Games’ movie?

Why are China and Thailand scared <br />of the new ‘Hunger Games’ movie?

WORLDVIEWS | The blockbuster’s overtly political narrative may have fallen afoul of government censors.

Bill Cosby’s interview with AP shows power and privilege in operation

Bill Cosby’s interview with AP shows power and privilege in operation

CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK | Cosby had suggested that questions about rape allegations were irresponsible.

Cosby questions AP’s ‘integrity’ in interview

Fla. woman latest to accuse Cosby of forced sex

When a nearly $1 billion divorce settlement award isn’t enough

When a nearly $1 billion divorce settlement award isn’t enough

COLUMN | Shouldn’t the spouses divide their enormous household net worth more equally?

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MEXICO NEWS

Image Credit

Protesters marched in the capital Thursday to demand authorities find 43 missing college students, seeking to pressure the government on a day traditionally reserved for the celebration of Mexico's 1910-17 Revolution.

Package labels on fresh cuts of meat that identify where animals were born, raised and slaughtered face an uncertain future after successful trade challenges from Canada and Mexico.

Mexico's president must respond to conflicts if he wants a chance at progress.

Relatives of 43 Mexican students who went missing in September are giving blood to build a DNA bank in hopes that it will help find their loved ones.

The music director of the southern Mexico state of Yucatan has been found strangled to death, three days after he disappeared.

Mexico's first lady said late Tuesday that she will sell her interest in a personal home built and still owned by a company that has gained millions in contracts under President Enrique Pena Nieto, an apparent effort to quell a conflict-of-interest scandal that has surrounded the couple.
Protesters hurled fire-bombs at the headquarters of Mexico's governing party in Oaxaca on Monday, demanding justice over the disappearance of 43 students in the state of Guerrero.

The case of the 43 who went missing in Iguala is bad for the president and the opposition alike.

An accused leader of a Mexican drug-trafficking cartel pleaded not guilty in federal court Monday after being extradited to the United States.

Outrage in Mexico over missing students broadens into fury at corruption, inequality

Rage over the fate of 43 students has grown into fury against corrupt politicians and their druf-trafficking cronies.

In Mexico, protests over missing students light ‘flame of insurgency’

Rage over the disappearance of 43 students has grown into a broader fury against corrupt politicians.

Anger mounts over missing students

Families of 43 students who have gone missing in Mexico organized rallies demanding the government work harder to bring back their children alive.

A federal judge has opened a court proceeding against the former mayor of a southern Mexico city in crimes that preceded the case of 43 missing students from a teachers' college.

Gallery
Protesters take to the streets - blocking highways, seizing town squares and vandalizing property - to demand accountability.
More than a month after 43 college students disappeared following an attack by police in southern Mexico, many of their parents are refusing to accept the government's view that the youths were slain. Mexicans angry over the case kept up their protests during the past week, blockading highways and setting fire to government buildings.
In a show of military muscle amid tensions with the West, Russia will send long-range strategic bombers on regular patrol missions across the globe, from the Arctic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico, a top official said Wednesday.

Kidnapped Ugandan priest's remains ID'd in Mexico

The remains of a Ugandan priest kidnapped more than six months ago have been found in a mass grave in southern Mexico, Roman Catholic authorities said Friday.
Two survivors of a mass slaying by Mexican soldiers who have been jailed for weapons possession are innocent and should be released immediately, the outgoing president of the National Commission on Human Rights says.
Local business owners say violent protests spurred by anger over the apparent massacre of 43 Mexican students by corrupt police and gang members have turned tourists away from Acapulco.

Protesters in Mexico set fire to the Guerrero State Congress building and the education department's audit office in Chilpancingo, Guerrero, on Thursday, as anger over the 43 missing students teachers grows.

Veterans remembered, Acapulco protesters clash with police over missing students, pole dance championship and more.

Parents of missing Mexican students cling to hope

Maria Telumbre knows fire. She spends her days making tortillas over hot coals, and experience tells her a small goat takes at least four hours to cook. So she refuses to believe the government's explanation that gang thugs incinerated her son and 42 other missing college students in a giant pyre in less than a day, leaving almost nothing to identify the dead.

A son of alleged Sinaloa drug cartel boss Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada has been captured in northwestern Mexico, a federal official said Thursday.
The U.S. government now patrols nearly half the Mexican border by drones alone in a largely unheralded shift to control desolate stretches where there are no agents, camera towers, ground sensors or fences, and it plans to expand the strategy to the Canadian border.

Mexico's president has tried to keep the issue of violence issue separate from his focus on the economy, but the two are converging as violent protests over 43 disappeared students squelch tourism in Acapulco just before a major holiday weekend.

President Enrique Pena Nieto's government, which had seen smooth sailing through its first year and a half in office, is suddenly listing in the face of multiple crises.

An off-the-cuff comment by the attorney general to cut off a news conference about the apparent killing of 43 missing college students has been taken up by protesters as a rallying cry against Mexico's corruption and drug trade-fueled violence.
"Enough, I'm tired" is used as a hashtag by protesters.
An offhand remark by the attorney general has become a rallying slogan for Mexicans outraged by the disappearance of dozens of students.
A home paid for by the country's first lady, Angelica Rivera, sparks questions about conflict of interest.

The private home of President Enrique Pena Nieto was built and is registered under the name of a company connected to a controversial high-speed rail contract that he abruptly canceled last week, according to a report by a leading Mexican journalist.

The victims were found shot, burned, wrapped in plastic bags and dumped in a river, Mexican authorities said.

Mexico: Burned remains probably are 43 missing

Hundreds of charred fragments of bone and teeth were fished from a river and its banks, authorities said.

The Mexican government said Wednesday it has agreed on protective measures for a witness who told The Associated Press and Esquire magazine that soldiers killed 21 suspected gang members after they surrendered at a warehouse in southern Mexico in late June.

Protesters demand Mexico find 43 missing students

Tens of thousands of people marched down Mexico City's main boulevard Wednesday evening to protest the disappearance of 43 young people in the south of the country and demand the government find them.
Students in Mexico City by the thousands demand answers for missing Guerrero students.
Recent discoveries at Mexico's Teotihuacan ruin site suggest that water features may have been a key part of the complex.
In stories that ran Nov. 1 and Oct. 31 about the release of US Marine veteran Andrew Tahmooressi, The Associated Press reported erroneously Tahmooressi's status with the Marines. He was honorably discharged after serving his four-year enlistment, not retired.

 

Mexican mayor, wife detained in case of 43 missing

Federal police early Tuesday detained the former mayor of the southern Mexican city of Iguala and his wife, who are accused of ordering the Sept. 26 attacks on teachers' college students that left six dead and 43 still missing.
Mexican human rights investigators on Tuesday interviewed employees at an import car lot where the parents of three young Americans shot to death in Mexico say they found their vehicles.
Seven Mexican soldiers have been formally charged with crimes ranging from homicide to improper conduct in connection with the shooting deaths of suspected gang members at a rural warehouse on June 30, officials said Sunday.
Chinese firm wins Mexican rail contract
A consortium headed by China Railway Construction Corp. Ltd. won the contract to build a high-speed inter-city rail line in central Mexico Monday after submitting the only bid on the Project.
Mexican football got a boost in September when former Brazil and Barcelona star Ronaldinho - a two-time FIFA player of the year - joined modest local club Queretaro.
An 11-year-old Mexican boy suffering from a massive tumor, who drew international attention after U.S. Homeland Security Investigations helped him get treatment in New Mexico, is scheduled to have a series of surgeries in Albuquerque to remove the large growth on his shoulder.

Seven cyclists and an assistant who were kidnapped while on a training ride in the mountainous outskirts of the Mexican capital were released hours later after a ransom was paid, authorities said Friday.

Hundreds of men and women came together in Mexico City Saturday to set a world record for the largest gathering of "skeleton ladies" -- a traditional symbol of the Day of the Dead.
Authorities were investigating on Friday a possible police connection to the killing of three U.S. citizens visiting their father in Mexico who were found shot to death along with a Mexican friend more than two weeks after going missing.
A Mexican judge has ordered the immediate release of a jailed U.S. Marine veteran who spent eight months behind bars for crossing the border with loaded guns.

Mexico judge orders immediate release of Marine

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto met with parents of 43 missing teachers college students for the first time since they disappeared, apparently handed over to a drug gang by city police more than a month ago.
Mexico's Supreme Court on Thursday rejected a bid to hold a national referendum on a major energy overhaul that opened the sector to widespread private investment for the first time in 76 years.
Three U.S. citizens missing for more than two weeks have been found dead in Mexico near the border city of Matamoros, and authorities are questioning a local police unit about possible involvement, the attorney general in northern Tamaulipas state said Thursday.

A yearslong exploration of a tunnel sealed almost 2,000 years ago at the ancient city of Teotihuacan yielded thousands of relics and the discovery of three chambers that could hold more important finds, Mexican archaeologists said Wednesday.

Mexico investigators comb gully for missing 43

Forensic experts combed a gully in southern Mexico on Tuesday for the remains of 43 missing students, as frustration mounted among relatives of both the disappeared and the detained over the lack of answers more than a month into the investigation.

Guerrero gets new gov. after Mexico disappearances

A sociologist and former university administrator has been named governor of Guerrero, a state in southern Mexico that has been rocked by protests over the disappearance of 43 college students who were last seen in police custody.

© 1996-2010 The Washington Post Company

NPR

November 19, 2014

Eyder Peralta

Amid rumblings about conflict of interest and corruption, Mexico's first lady says she will sell a multimillion-dollar home in one of the most glamorous areas of Mexico City.

In a YouTube video released late Tuesday, Angélica Rivera defiantly proclaims that she has "nothing to hide."

"I have worked all my life, and because of that I am an independent woman capable of building a patrimony with honesty," she said.

Rivera and her husband, President Enrique Peña Nieto, have been under heavy scrutiny lately: first, because of the way the government has handled the case of 43 students who went missing after they were detained by police, and then after Aristegui Noticias revealed that an opulent modern structure dubbed "The White House" and valued at $7 million was owned by a construction company awarded millions in government contracts.

As Aristegui explained, the house, which Rivera showed off in a glitzy spread in the royal-centric magazine ¡Hola!, was just another symbol of the "close relationship between Peña Nieto and Grupo Higa."

According to the investigation, Grupo Higa is owned by Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantú, who in the past rented out airplanes for the Peña Nieto's 2012 presidential campaign. The company, Aristegui reports, received millions of dollars in contracts in the state of Mexico when Peña Nieto was governor.

Once Peña Nieto was in the presidential palace, a subsidiary of Hinojosa's company was awarded part of a huge contract to build a high-speed train from Mexico City to Querétaro.

Just days before the report was published, Peña Nieto canceled the $3.7 billion contract.

More, HERE.

© 2014 NPR

Al Jazeera America

Please click on HERE to get updated Al Jazeera, Mexico news

Thousands march in Mexico over students

Tens of thousands of people angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students are marching in Mexico City as part of another day of nationwide protests.

Protesters on Thursday waved blackened flags of Mexico and many chanted for the resignation of President Enrique Pena Nieto. "He will fall, he will fall, Pena Nieto will fall," they chanted.

Some protesters clashed with riot police near the city's international airport at the start of the day's demonstrations, burning tyres, throwing firebombs and launching firecrackers at police.

Thursday’s protest was the latest protest over the government's handling of a crime that has infuriated Mexicans fed up with corruption, impunity and a drug war that has left more than 100,000 people dead or missing since 2006.

The case has turned into the biggest challenge of Pena Nieto's nearly two-year-old presidency, on top of another scandal over a mansion his wife bought from a government contractor.

'Mexico is hurting'

The crisis erupted after the mayor of the city of Iguala allegedly ordered police to confront students on September 26, sparking a night of violence that left six people dead and 43 missing, authorities say.

Protesters angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students take to the streets for another day of demonstrations.

More, HERE.

Police officer fires on Mexico City students, inflaming tensions

Students had been planning for a Nov. 20 national strike in solidarity with 43 missing students from Guerrero

INSIDE STORY

VIDEO: Missing Mexico students: Who is responsible.

Protesters demand justice for missing 43 trainee teachers who are feared murdered in Mexico. To watch video click on HERE.

Mexico president pushes trade ties in China while protests rage at home

Peña Nieto's Beijing trip amid massive political crisis at home shows heavy bet on China ties as economic boost

Mexico missing student protesters burn state buildings

Protest movement has hit Guerrero'€™s tourism industry with vacationers canceling trips during busiest time of year.

Photos: In Acapulco, an angry demonstration over missing students

Students, peasants and others attempt to block the airport and clash with police.

Mexico leader travels to Asia amid rising unrest over missing students

Peña Nieto faces increased calls to resign as another presidential scandal emerged over the weekend

Mexico protesters set fire to National Palace over missing students

Gang members have confessed to killing the 43 missing students and dumping their charred remains in a landfill.

Gang members confess to mass killing of Mexico students

Charred human remains found in a dumpster are likely the students who disappeared on Sept. 26, Mexican authorities say.

Mexican army accepts criticism of human rights commission in killings

The defense department says, however, it doesn't agree with all findings of human rights commission on the June slayings.

Why have the most recent kidnappings in Mexico sparked such outrage?

The disappearance of 43 students in Mexico has triggered nationwide demonstrations for government accountability.

Thousands protest missing Mexico students despite mayor arrest

Public anger over student disappearances brings Mexico City to a standstill; full-blown crisis for President Peña Nieto.

Photos: Protests over 43 Guerrero students target government buildings

A city congress and buildings tied to the ruling party are trashed and burned.

The food producer has developed more than 480 varieties of wheat, upping production by an estimated 200 million tonnes.

Mexican official: CIA 'manages' drug trade

Spokesman for Chihuahua state says US agencies don't want to end drug trade, a claim denied by other Mexican officials

24 Jul 2012, by Chris Arsenault

Juarez, Mexico - The US Central Intelligence Agency and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers", a spokesman for the Chihuahua state government in northern Mexico has told Al Jazeera, instead "they try to manage the drug trade".

Allegations about official complicity in the drug business are nothing new when they come from activists, professors, campaigners or even former officials. However, an official spokesman for the authorities in one of Mexico's most violent states - one which directly borders Texas - going on the record with such accusations is unique.

"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva, the Chihuahua spokesman, told Al Jazeera last month at his office in Juarez. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."

Accusations are 'baloney'

Villanueva is not a high ranking official and his views do not represent Mexico's foreign policy establishment. Other more senior officials in Chihuahua State, including the mayor of Juarez, dismissed the claims as "baloney".

"I think the CIA and DEA [US Drug Enforcement Agency] are on the same side as us in fighting drug gangs," Hector Murguia, the mayor of Juarez, told Al Jazeera during an interview inside his SUV. "We have excellent collaboration with the US."

Under the Merida Initiative, the US Congress has approved more than $1.4bn in drug war aid for Mexico, providing attack helicopters, weapons and training for police and judges.

More than 55,000 people have died in drug related violence in Mexico since December 2006. Privately, residents and officials across Mexico's political spectrum often blame the lethal cocktail of US drug consumption and the flow of high-powered weapons smuggled south of the border for causing much of the carnage.

"The war on drugs is an illusion," Hugo Almada Mireles, professor at the Autonomous University of Juarez and author of several books, told Al Jazeera. "It's a reason to intervene in Latin America."

"The CIA wants to control the population; they don't want to stop arms trafficking to Mexico, look at [Operation] Fast and Furious,” he said, referencing a botched US exercise where automatic weapons were sold to criminals in the hope that security forces could trace where the guns ended up.

The Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms lost track of 1,700 guns as part of the operation, including an AK-47 used in 2010 the murder of Brian Terry, a Customs and Border Protection Agent.

More, HERE.

© 2014 Al Jazeera America, LLC. All rights reserved.

InSight Crime

InSight Crime is a foundation dedicated to the study of the principal threat to national and citizen security in Latin America and the Caribbean: organized crime. We seek to deepen and inform the debate about organized crime in the Americas by providing the general public with regular reporting, analysis and investigation on the subject and on state efforts to combat it. More about Insight Crime HERE.

Iguala Massacre: Mexico's PR Message Goes Up in Flames

The stunning, dramatic blow-by-blow account of what most likely happened to the 43 missing students in Guerrero is an indication of just how desperately Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto and his team are trying to perform damage control on a terrifying story -- one that has not only unsettled his government, but has pushed them to admit that things are not as their public relations machine would have you believe.

In the hour-long November 7 press conference (see video below), Attorney General Jose Murillo Karam announced that the recent capture of alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos led to confessions that the students were taken by police while en route to the town of Iguala. The police handed the students over to the Guerreros Unidos, who then killed them and burned their remains.

Specifically, video testimonies from three recently captured “masterminds” of the attacks revealed that the students were carted like cattle to a landfill in Cocula. According to one suspect, approximately 15 students asphyxiated on the way to the dump site. The remaining students were interrogated by members of the Guerreros Unidos before being shot and killed. The bodies were then thrown into the landfill, arranged in a circle, covered in sticks, gasoline, and diesel, and burned. The fire reportedly lasted for 14 hours, from midnight on September 27, until mid-afternoon.

According to the testimonies, a leader of the criminal group known as “El Terco” ordered the burned human remains to be collected and placed into eight black plastic bags. Members of the Guerreros Unidos then took the bags to the San Juan River in Cocula, where they dumped the contents into the water, while two bags were thrown directly into the river.

Following the confessions, search teams found black bags, one of which was still closed. Mexican and Argentine forensic teams reportedly confirmed the bag contained human remains. However, due to the degree to which the bodies were burned, forensic experts have not yet determined when the remains will be able to be identified.

More, HERE.

Business Insider

Tens Of Thousands Of Mexicans Protest In The Streets Over 43 Missing Students

Carola Sole, AFP

Oct. 9, 2014

Mexico City (AFP) - Tens of thousands of people held protests in Mexico, joining tearful families of 43 missing students demanding their return amid fears a police-backed gang executed them.

Crowds on Wednesday gathered from Mexico City to the violence-wracked state of Guerrero, where the students disappeared, and as far south as Chiapas.

Parents of the victims traveled from Guerrero to head a march of thousands of people in Mexico City, tearfully holding up pictures of their sons, and signs reading "we want them back alive."

More, HERE.

Mexican Official Accuses CIA Of 'Managing' Not 'Fighting' The Drug Trade

Jul. 24, 2012, by

A Mexican state government spokesman told Al Jazeera that the CIA and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers" as much as "try to manage the drug trade," Chris Arsenault reports.

"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Chihuahua spokesman Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva told Al Jazeera. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."

More, HERE.

Copyright © 2014 Business Insider Inc. All rights reserved.

Infowars.com

Former CIA Officer Says ISIS and Mexican Drug Cartels Communicate

U.S. Gov. and CIA connected to drugs and terror

By Kurt Nimmo | Infowars.com | August 21, 2014

A former CIA officer, now a security consultant who regularly appears on Fox News, told the Laura Ingraham Show Thursday ISIS and Mexican drug cartels communicate with each other.

“We’ve had good intel over the years about al-Qaeda, about their efforts to coordinate with, as an example, Mexican cartels… in an effort to try to exploit our southern border,” Mike Baker told Ingraham.

The one-time CIA employee said there is “a lot of communication” between ISIS and drug cartels and “the cartels are a business… if there’s a revenue stream they can exploit, then they will, and the extremists understand that.”

It is not clear if this intel was passed on to Baker by his former colleagues.

In 2012 a spokesman for the Chihuahua state in Mexico, Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva told Aljazerra the CIA and other intelligence agencies manage the drug trade in Mexico.

More, HERE.

Contact:512-291-5750512-291-5750 512-291-5750512-291-5750 512-291-5750512-291-5750 512-291-5750512-291-5750 , This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Infowars, P.O. Box 19549, Austin, TX 78760

The Daily Beast

Anatomy of a Mexican Student Massacre

10.08.14, by Jason McGahan

For almost a century a teacher’s college in rural Mexico has been training educators and activists. Last month, dozens were abducted and slaughtered—by the police.

MEXICO CITY — Twelve days ago, police and unidentified gunmen believed to be members of a drug cartel ambushed a caravan of college student activists in the state of Guerrero, about half way from Mexico City to Acapulco.

Near the central plaza in the town of Iguala, a total of six persons were shot to death. Three were student activists from the Raúl Isidro Burgos Rural Teachers College of Ayotzinapa. Three additional shooting victims were a semiprofessional soccer player riding in one of the three buses, a taxi driver, and his female passenger. But most likely they were unintended victims caught in the line of fire. There’s no question the students were the target.

One who survived the first fusillade, a 19-year-old named Julio César Mondragón, panicked and, over the objections of classmates who said they should stay together, ran away on his own. He was later found dead and horribly disfigured; a photo of his corpse has gone viral in Mexico: it shows the face stripped away to the bare skull underneath.

Survivors of the incident report that the police and thugs attacked the students three times. They sprayed one of the buses with machine gun fire. One eyewitness reported seeing the police force students out of another bus at gunpoint. In addition to the three students killed, 17 student activists were wounded. But they may have been the lucky ones. As many as 44 others were abducted. Some reports say they were taken away in police vehicles. None of them have been seen since September 26.

The precise motives for the killings are difficult to determine, but the students come from a school that has been training rural teachers—and activists—for the better part of a century. Their commitment to helping small farmers and farm workers in the rugged, semi-feudal countryside often has put them at odds with the local powers that be. And when you add to that the cozy relationship that exists today between some of those powers and narcotics traffickers, the situation is explosive.

More, HERE.

© 2014 The Daily Beast Company LLC

The New American

U.S. Government and Top Mexican Drug Cartel Exposed as Partners

14 January 2014, by 

For over a decade, under multiple administrations, the U.S. government had a secret agreement with the ruthless Mexican Sinaloa drug cartel that allowed it to operate with impunity, an in-depth investigation by a leading Mexican newspaper confirmed this week. In exchange for information and assistance in quashing competing criminal syndicates, the Bush and Obama administrations let the Sinaloa cartel import tons of drugs into the United States while wiping out Sinaloa competitors and ensuring that its leaders would not be prosecuted for their long list of major crimes. Other revelations also point strongly to massive but clandestine U.S. government involvement in drug trafficking.

Relying on over 100 interviews with current and former government functionaries on both sides of the border, as well as official documents from the U.S. and Mexican governments, Mexico’s El Universal concluded that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and the U.S. Justice Department had secretly worked with Mexican drug lords. The controversial conspiring led to increased violence across Mexico, where many tens of thousands have been murdered in recent years, the newspaper found after its year-long probe. The U.S. agents and their shady deals with Mexican drug lords even sparked what the paper called a “secret war” inside Mexico.

The newspaper’s investigation also confirmed long-held suspicions that U.S. authorities were signing secret agreements with Mexican drug cartels — especially Sinaloa, which CIA operatives have said was a favorite for use in achieving geo-political objectives. Supposedly without the knowledge or approval of officials in Mexico, ICE and DEA, with a green light from Washington, D.C., made deals with criminal bosses allowing them to avoid prosecution for a vast crime spree that has included mass murder, corruption, bribery, drug trafficking, extortion, and more. In exchange, cartel leaders simply had to help U.S. officials eliminate their competitors — certainly a win-win scenario for crime bosses who prefer to operate without competition or fear of prosecution.

More, HERE.

Alex Newman, a foreign correspondent for The New American, is normally based in Europe after growing up in Latin America, including seven years in Mexico. He can be reached at   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Related articles:

CIA “Manages” Drug Trade, Mexican Official Says

Reports: CIA Working with Mexican Drug Cartels

Trafficker: U.S. Feds Aided Mexican Drug Cartel

Mexican Drug Trafficker Says He Worked With Feds

Stratfor Sources: U.S. Troops in Mexico as Feds Aid Cartels

Congress Probes DEA Drug Money Laundering Scheme

Feds Let Mexican Cartel Hit Men Kill in U.S., Senior Lawman Told Stratfor

Fast and Furious: FBI Now Linked to Murder of U.S. Border Agent

U.S. Judge: Obama Homeland Security Aiding Criminal Conspiracies

Impeachment Support Soars as Voters Say Feds “Out of Control”

Copyright © 2014 The New American

GlobalPost – International News

Mexico accepts student demands in bid to avert spread of protests

Agencia EFE; October 4, 2014

Mexico City, Oct 4 (EFE).- Mexico's government has accepted all the demands of student protesters at the National Polytechnic Institute, or IPN, a public university in this capital, in a bid to prevent the movement from spreading to other higher education institutions.

On Sept. 22, students at the IPN's Superior School of Engineering and Architecture halted activities to protest new internal regulations that they said lowered the institution's academic and professional level.

More, HERE.

Copyright EFE, 2014.

Home

Local Opposition to Washington’s Legal Marijuana Businesses Is a Taxing Issue For the Fledgling Industry

Posted by Bill Conroy - November 14, 2014

Effort to Overcome City Moratoriums on Cannabis Shops Could Spark an Unlikely Alliance

The great experiment in the state of Washington to legalize the sale of marijuana through a regulated and taxed market has hit a hitch at the local level that threatens to slow progress to a snail’s pace, even as more and more marijuana businesses obtain the state licensing needed to open their doors.

Through early November, Washington’s cannabis market, state records show, included some 63 retailers, 239 producers and 197 processors — all issued the required state-level licenses to begin doing business in the state. But the battle ahead for many of them — and others in the pipeline — to actually open their doors for business is far from over.

More, HERE.

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Labor Unions Are Supporting Washington State Legal Marijuana Dispensaries that Create "More Workers to Organize"

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 22, 2014

The United Food and Commercial Workers and other Unions Seek to Strengthen Protections for Cannabis Workers

What’s going on in the state of Washington and beyond with the movement to legalize marijuana is, only in part, about business, taxes and government oversight — all to be amplified by the billions of dollars annually this new industry promises to throw off.

More, HERE.

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Community Police in Guerrero’s Costa Chica Region to Celebrate 19 Years of a Better Way to Combat Crime and Corruption

The Same Southern Mexican State Where 43 Students Were Disappeared Is also Home to a Grassroots Movement that Shows How People Can Police Themselves When the State Becomes Criminal.

By Greg Berger and Oscar Olivera
Special for The Narco News Bulletin

November 7, 2014

Publisher’s Note: In Mexico and throughout the world the state of Guerrero has become a vivid example of the horrors of the “war on drugs” and the pervasive corruption and violence it invites from all levels of government. On September 26, Mayor Jose Luis Abarca of the city of Iguala ordered police to detain a group of students from the local Ayotzinapa teachers’ college. The mayor’s ties to organized crime have been widely documented. It is believed that the mayor thought the students were planning to stage a protest at a public event held by his wife. Police then killed six students, and 43 more were disappeared. The police reportedly turned the 43 youths over to a local criminal gang. Multiple mass graves have been dug up in the area, each at first rumored to contain the bodies of the students, then have been revealed to be the tombs of previous nameless casualties of the US-imposed drug war. The whereabouts of the missing students are still unknown.

More, HERE.

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Millions Missing From DEA Money-Laundering Operation

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 6, 2014

But No One With the Power to Investigate Seems to Care

At least $20 million went missing from money seizures by law enforcers, critical evidence was destroyed by a federal agency, a key informant was outed by a US prosecutor — contributing to her being kidnapped and nearly killed — and at the end of the day not a single narco-trafficker was prosecuted in this four-year-long DEA undercover operation gone awry.

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Charles Bowden has died, but his voice is louder than ever

Posted by Bill Conroy - September 2, 2014

As one of the original authentic journalists, he trailblazed a path for others to follow

When I heard that he had passed, my eyes welled with tears. I’m of stoic Irish stock, so I don’t shed tears easily, but the news of Charles Bowden’s death (1945-2014) was not an easy thing to bear. He had been a mentor and a friend to me for a decade, and his leaving hurts.

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Official US Cover-Up Still Obscures Motive for Juarez Consulate Murders

Posted by Bill Conroy - May 7, 2014
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U.S. Military: More Counter-Narcotics Funding Will Help Stem Exodus of Children from Central America

 

By Bill Conroy - July 29, 2014

 

Critics Argue Drug-War Money is Part of the Problem, Not the Solution.

 

Some 58,000 migrant children, mostly Central Americans, have made the treacherous journey to the U.S. southern border alone over the past 10 months, but actions being considered by U.S. officials to combat the problem with more military and drug-war aid to their countries, critics warn, may worsen the violence that provokes this unprecedented exodus.

 

The number of unaccompanied children that have arrived at the U.S. border so far this fiscal year is up 106 percent from the same period a year earlier — with the total expected to reach 90,000 before Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year.


To put that latter number in perspective, it is nearly five times larger than the number of Border Patrol agents now stationed along the entire southern border.

More, HERE.
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MORE NARCO NEWS, HERE

25 Deadliest Mass Shootings in U.S. History Fast Facts

By CNN Library; September 2, 2014

(CNN) -- Here is a list of the 25 deadliest single day mass shootings in U.S. history from 1949 to the present. If the shooter was killed or committed suicide during the incident that death is not included in the total.

Timeline:

32 killed - April 16, 2007 - Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. A gunman, 23-year-old student Seung-Hui Cho, goes on a shooting spree killing 32 people in two locations and wounds an undetermined number of others on campus. The shooter, Seung-Hui Cho then committed suicide.

27 killed - December 14, 2012 - Sandy Hook Elementary School - Newtown, Connecticut. Adam Lanza, 20, guns down 20 children, ages 6 and 7, and six adults, school staff and faculty, before turning the gun on himself. Investigating police later find Nancy Lanza, Adam's mother, dead from a gunshot wound. The final count is 28 dead, including the shooter.

23 killed - October 16, 1991 - In Killeen, Texas, 35-year-old George Hennard crashes his pickup truck through the wall of a Lubys Cafeteria. After exiting the truck, Hennard shoots and kills 23 people. He then commits suicide.

21 killed - July 18, 1984 - In San Ysidro, California, 41-year-old James Huberty, armed with a long-barreled Uzi, a pump-action shotgun and a handgun shoots and kills 21 adults and children at a local McDonalds. A police sharpshooter kills Huberty one hour after the rampage begins.

18 killed - August 1, 1966 - In Austin, Texas, Charles Joseph Whitman, a former U.S. Marine, kills 16 and wounds at least 30 while shooting from a University of Texas tower. Police officers Ramiro Martinez and Houston McCoy shot and killed Whitman in the tower. Whitman had also killed his mother and wife earlier in the day.

14 killed - August 20, 1986 - Edmond, Oklahoma part-time mail carrier, Patrick Henry Sherrill, armed with three handguns kills 14 postal workers in ten minutes and then takes his own life with a bullet to the head.

13 killed - November 5, 2009 - Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan kills 13 people and injures 32 at Fort Hood, Texas, during a shooting rampage. He is convicted and sentenced to death.

13 killed - April 3, 2009 - In Binghamton, New York, Jiverly Wong kills 13 people and injures four during a shooting at an immigrant community center. He then kills himself.

13 killed - April 20, 1999 - Columbine High School - Littleton, Colorado. 18-year-old Eric Harris and

17-year-old Dylan Klebold kill 12 fellow students and one teacher before committing suicide in the school library.

13 killed - September 25, 1982 - In Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 40-year-old George Banks, a prison guard, kills 13 people including five of his own children. In September 2011, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturns his death sentence stating that Banks is mentally incompetent.

13 killed - September 5, 1949 - In Camden, New Jersey, 28-year-old Howard Unruh, a veteran of World War II, shoots and kills 13 people as he walks down Camden's 32nd Street. His weapon of choice is a German-crafted Luger pistol. He is found insane and is committed to a state mental institution. He dies at the age of 88.

12 killed - September 16, 2013 - Shots are fired inside the Washington Navy Yard killing 12. The shooter, identified as Aaron Alexis, 34, is also killed.

12 killed - July 20, 2012 - Twelve people are killed and 58 are wounded in a shooting at an Aurora, Colorado, movie theater screening of the new Batman film. James E. Holmes, 24, is taken into custody outside of the movie theater. The gunman is dressed head-to-toe in protective tactical gear, set off two devices of some kind before spraying the theater with bullets from an AR-15 rifle, a 12-gauge shotgun and at least one of two .40-caliber handguns police recovered at the scene.

12 killed - July 29, 1999 - In Atlanta, 44-year-old Mark Barton kills his wife and two children at his home. He then opens fire in two different brokerage houses killing nine people and wounding 12. He later kills himself.

10 killed - March 10, 2009 - In Alabama, Michael McLendon of Kinston, kills 10 and himself. The dead include his mother, grandparents, aunt and uncle.

9 killed - March 21, 2005 - Red Lake High School, Red Lake, Minnesota. 16-year-old Jeff Weise kills his grandfather and another adult, five students, a teacher and a security officer. He then kills himself.

9 killed - June 18, 1990 - In Jacksonville, Florida, 42-year-old James Pough, angry about his car being repossessed, opens fire at at a General Motors Acceptance Corp. office, killing nine people. Pough takes his own life.

8 killed - October 12, 2011 - Eight people are killed during a shooting at the Salon Meritage in Seal Beach, California. The suspect, Scott Evans Dekraai, 41, of Huntington Beach, is arrested without incident as he is trying to leave the scene. The eight dead include Dekraai's ex-wife, Michelle Fournier, 48. He was armed with three guns -- a 9 mm Springfield, a Smith & Wesson .44 Magnum, and a Heckler & Koch .45 -- and was wearing body armor during the shooting rampage.

8 killed - August 3, 2010 - Manchester, Connecticut - Omar Thornton kills eight co-workers at Hartford Distributors before turning the gun on himself. Thornton had been asked to resign for stealing and selling alcoholic beverages.

8 killed - January 19, 2010 - Christopher Speight, 39, kills eight people at a house in Appomattox, Virginia. He surrenders to police at the scene the next morning, and is charged with one count of murder with additional charges pending.

8 killed - March 29, 2009 - In Carthage, North Carolina, 45-year-old Robert Stewart kills a nurse and seven elderly patients at a nursing home. In May, the Moore County district attorney announces she will seek the death penalty. On September 3, 2011, a jury finds Stewart guilty of second-degree murder. Stewart is sentenced to 141 to 179 years in prison.

8 killed - December 5, 2007 - In Omaha, Nebraska, 19-year-old Robert Hawkins goes to an area mall and kills eight shoppers before killing himself.

8 killed - July 1, 1993 - In San Francisco, 55-year-old Gian Luigi Ferri kills eight people in a law office and then kills himself.

8 killed - September 14, 1989 - In Louisville, Kentucky, 47-year-old Joseph Wesbecker armed with a AK-47 semiautomatic assault rifle, two MAC-11 semiautomatic pistols, a .38 caliber handgun, a 9-millimeter semiautomatic pistol and a bayonet kills eight co-workers at Standard Gravure Corporation and then kills himself. He had been placed on disability leave from his job due to mental problems.

8 killed - August 20, 1982 - In Miami, 51-year-old history teacher Carl Robert Brown, angry about a repair bill and armed with a shotgun, kills eight people at a machine shop. He flees by bicycle, but is shot in the back by a witness who pursued him. He was on leave from school for psychological treatment.

List of rampage killers (school massacres), by Wikipedia

List of school shootings in the United States, by Wikipedia

Starting with Pontiac's Rebellion school massacre on July 26, 1764 to August 6, 2014in River Woods Elementary when an 11-year-old student at RWES in Des Moines, Iowa, brought a BB gun to the school accompanied by two former students aged 11 & 16. The student admitted to having the weapon and making threats against 4 students. Police recovered the gun and arrested the alleged students

More, HERE.

America's Wars: U.S. Casualties and Veterans

The table below has information about the total number of service members, battle deaths, and nonmortal woundings in wars from 1775 to 2012; such as the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War I and II, Vietnam, and more

Information Please® Database, © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

67% of all homicides in the U.S. were conducted using a firearm: UN

According to the FBI, in 2012, there were 8,855 total firearm-related homicides in the US, with 6,371 of those attributed to handguns. 61% of all gun-related deaths in the U.S. are suicides. More, HERE by Wikipedia.

Crime in the United States

Crime in the United States has been present since colonization

Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

© 2014 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved

GLOBAL RESEARCH

ISIL invasion

The US led war against the Islamic State is a big lie. Going after ”Islamic terrorists” is used to justify a military agenda. The Islamic State is a creation of US intelligence. Washington’s “Counter-terrorism Agenda” in Iraq & Syria consists in Supporting the Terrorists.

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Angry Protests Sweep Mexico after Government Says Missing Students are Dead

Global Research, November 11, 2014

Angry protests swept Mexico over the weekend in the wake of a press conference Friday in which Jesús Murillo Karam, the country’s attorney general, declared that 43 missing teaching students from the Ayotzinapa Normal School in the state of Guerrero are all dead. Murrillo based this evaluation on confessions by gang members that they had killed the students, who were handed over to them by the police, and then burned their bodies.

Demonstrations in both Mexico City and the Guerrero capital of Chilpancingo saw clashes with police and attacks on government buildings. In the capital, a small group of demonstrators launched an attack on the historic National Palace in the city’s main square (El Zócalo). They first used metal security barriers to ram the building’s wooden door and then doused it with gasoline and set it on fire.

Some demonstrators questioned why it took police so long to respond to these acts, suggesting that they could have been the work of provocateurs.

More, HERE.

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More than 100,000 March in Mexico City over Disappeared Students

By Rafael Azul; Global Research, November 07, 2014

A mass protest march of more than 100,000 students, teachers, education workers and ordinary citizens took place in Mexico City on Wednesday, November 5, in solidarity with the 43 missing teaching students, normalistas, of the Ayotzinapa Normal School, who have been missing for over 40 days.

This was the third mass demonstration and by far the largest and angriest. Many of the participants directed their anger at President Enrique Peña Nieto, demanding that he resign. One protest sign denounced him “for corruption, betraying the nation, ineptitude,” calling him a “repressor and assassin.”

Others carried signs that said, “It was the State.” Leading the march were students from Mexico City’s National Autonomous Metropolitan University (UNAM), the Polytechnic Institute, rural teaching colleges, and Iberian-American University, who all had joined a massive nationwide 72-hour student strike.

At Mexico City’s Constitution Square (the Zócalo), many thousands greeted the protesters as they arrived after the two-and-a-half-hour march from the president’s mansion (Los Pinos). At the mass rally, family members of the 43 disappeared students spoke to the demonstrators. None of the major political parties (the governing PRI, the PAN, the PRD, the Greens) were involved in the protest.

More, HERE.
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Mexico Disarms Local Police in Missing Students’ City

By Press TV,Global Research, October 07, 2014

Mexican federal forces have disarmed the entire police department in the southern city of Iguala after its officers were accused of collaborating with a gang behind the recent disappearance of 43 students.

On Monday, the government’s new federal police unit took over security in Iguala, located some 200 kilometers (125 miles) south of the capital, Mexico City.

The federal unit was tasked with holding order in the city and helping search for the students who went missing last month after a deadly police shooting.

The deployment in the southern violence-stricken state of Guerrero came after President Enrique Pena Nieto vowed to establish justice and bring an end to corruption in the country.

Pena Nieto said he had dispatched the federal forces to Iguala to “find out what happened and apply the full extent of the law to those responsible.”The decision to disarm Iguala’s police corps came just days after 28 charred bodies were found in a mass grave on the outskirts of the city.

State prosecutor Inaky Blanco has said the recovered bodies probably belonged to the missing students. State officials also say it will take up to two weeks to receive the results of DNA tests to identify the corpses.

The students, all trainee teachers, went missing following a police attack on September 26 against a protest over teachers’ rights.

According to Blanco, state investigators have obtained video footage showing local police arresting a number of students during the clashes and taking them away.

Prosecutors said the Guerreros Unidos drug gang also participated in the police shooting that left six people dead and 25 others wounded.

Mexican authorities have already arrested 22 officers and issued arrest warrants for Iguala mayor Jose Luis Albarca and his security chief over the deadly incident.

More, HERE.

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Militarization and Political Crisis in Mexico

Is Mexico a Narco-State?

By Michael Werbowski;Global Research, May 31, 2010

Mexico - In the wake of Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s recent state visit to the U.S and Canada, a burning question remains without any clear answer.

2010 is historically significant for Mexico. It is its bi-centennial year of independence ( in 1810 the country began to break free from Spanish imperial tutelage) and perhaps more significantly is is also the centenary year of the 1910 Mexican revolution. There is little to celebrate though. The country this year, is still reeling from the vortex of drug-trafficking crimes, the global economic down-turn and the fall-out from the histrionics and panic induced by the H1N1-Swine flu “pandemic” of 2009.

Mexico after a decade of the centre-right almost “corporatist” PAN ( National Action Party) party’s rule, ( as in 2000, the first PAN candidate won the presidency, Vincente Fox) has been practically “Balkanised”. And as a result, it is now faced with a crippling fragmentation of the federation itself, due mainly to territorial battles or “turf wars” going on between rival drug cartels, which operate almost with impunity in many Mexican states. Possibly, the most fascinating and insightful read on this phenomenal topic is: Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State? . While I was pondering over the question raised by the book’s title , I was somewhat astonished to read in (despite what I witnessed first hand in Mexico) the concluding chapter, a rather reassuring reply. That basically, Mexico is far from becoming another Somalia, Pakistan or Haiti.

More, HERE.

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Destabilizing Mexico

By Rev. Richard Skaff; Global Research, March 13, 2009

Attorney General Eric Holder stated on February 25, 2009 that Mexican drug cartels pose a national security threat, and issued a direct warning to these cartels that they will be destroyed.

The warning came as the attorney general and acting Drug Enforcement Administration chief Michele Leonhart announced the completion of the final phase of DEA’s “Operation Xcellerator,” which targeted the Sinaloa cartel, a major western Mexico drug operation that has been expanding its reach into the United States . [1].

Meanwhile, the blood shed in the Mexican cities continues to be extensive and has expanded its tentacles of violence to various cities in Mexico. Lawlessness, corruption, murders, decapitations, and kidnappings have taken the Mexican cities by a storm, giving rise to a new radical group calling itself the Juarez Citizens Command that is threatening to strike back against lawlessness that has gripped Mexico for a long time. The group stated that they are going to strike back by killing one criminal a day until order and peace is restored. Similar groups are popping up all across Mexico. [2].

In its last report, the US Department of justice disclosed that 17.2 billion dollars in cash entered Mexico in only the past two years as a result of money laundering operation in their country. The report advised that Mexico and Colombia are the principal destinations of narco resources that operate in the US and that “the laundering of drug money is a global industry” with transnational organizations present in various countries. [2].

According to a DEA undercover operative, the Mexican drug cartels have gained more and more of the American market. They have grown bolder in their attempts to expand their operations in Mexico and the United States . They now control the ruling party in Mexico and operate the biggest drug business on earth right here in the USA . [2].

Mexico’s drug and violence problem now engulfs the entire country, inundating cities along the U.S.-Mexico border. The robust drug cartel reduced its position in the western mountains, and lunged into the heart of national power in Mexico City. The capital that was once relatively immune to such contemptuous boldness of drug killings has become the scene of multiple assassinations of high-ranking federal police officials in about a week. More than 1,000 people have been killed in Mexico this year in drug-related violence and about 6,290 in 2008. [11].

More, HERE.

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MORE MEXICO ARTICLES, BY GLOBAL RESEARCH, HERE

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New Evidence Proves Israel Attacked USS Liberty With Orders to Kill 294 Americans

By Aaron Nelson;Global Research, November 14, 2014

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US Government Sanitizes Vietnam War History

By Marjorie Cohn, Global Research, October 30, 2014, Marjoriecohn.com

For many years after the Vietnam War, we enjoyed the “Vietnam syndrome,” in which US presidents hesitated to launch substantial military attacks on other countries. They feared intense opposition akin to the powerful movement that helped bring an end to the war in Vietnam. But in 1991, at the end of the Gulf War, George H.W. Bush declared, “By God, we’ve kicked the Vietnam syndrome once and for all!”

With George W. Bush’s wars on Iraq and Afghanistan, and Barack Obama’s drone wars in seven Muslim-majority countries and his escalating wars in Iraq and Syria, we have apparently moved beyond the Vietnam syndrome. By planting disinformation in the public realm, the government has built support for its recent wars, as it did with Vietnam.

Now the Pentagon is planning to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War by launching a $30 million program to rewrite and sanitize its history. Replete with a fancy interactive website, the effort is aimed at teaching schoolchildren a revisionist history of the war. The program is focused on honoring our service members who fought in Vietnam. But conspicuously absent from the website is a description of the antiwar movement, at the heart of which was the GI movement.

Thousands of GIs participated in the antiwar movement.

More, HERE.

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Ottawa Lockdown (22 Oct 2014 - TD Photo)

Prime Minister Steven Harper is using the shooting rampage on Parliament Hill as a justification for imposing broad surveillance and detainment measures that were already being implemented.

Copyright © 2005-2014 GlobalResearch.ca

Mexico’s growing crisis: Reforms and democracy, but no rule of law

Nov 13th 2014

To save a promising presidency, Enrique Peña Nieto must tackle crime and corruption

From the print edition

DURING two years in office Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has received sharply contrasting reviews at home and abroad. Foreigners, including The Economist, have praised his structural reforms of the economy, which include an historic measure to open up energy to private investment (see article). Yet polls show that most Mexicans dislike Mr Peña. Among other things, they blame his government for a squeeze on living standards and the interlinked problems of violent crime and corruption. Sadly, recent events have lent support to Mr Peña’s domestic critics.

On November 8th Mexico’s attorney-general announced what almost everyone had already concluded: that 43 students from a teacher-training college in the southern state of Guerrero, who disappeared in the town of Iguala in late September, had been murdered by drug-traffickers after being kidnapped by the local police on the orders of the town’s mayor. Guerrero has been Mexico’s most violent state for centuries. The federal government bears no direct responsibility for these events. But Mexicans see in them a symbol of the failure of Mr Peña’s administration to make security a priority.

Now comes a problem that is uncomfortably close to home. The government had already opted to cancel a contract for a high-speed train that it had hastily awarded to the sole bidder, a consortium of Chinese and Mexican companies including a construction firm from the president’s home state. A local journalist has revealed that the boss of the same firm owns a $7m mansion that is the Peña family’s private residence (see article). The president denies any wrongdoing, but a common thread runs through these events.

Mexico only became a democracy in 2000, when seven decades of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the political machine that raised Mr Peña, were ended by electoral defeat. Unfortunately, democracy did not bring the rule of law to Mexico. Too many in the PRI still see the job of the police and the courts as enforcing political control, rather than investigating mobsters. Corrupt politicians are protected rather than punished. Organised crime and graft both remain a part of everyday life, and neither has been helped by the drugs flowing north to the United States.

More, HERE.

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Victims of Mexico’s drug war

Tracing the missing

Many thousands disappeared in Mexico’s drug war. The government should do more to find them

Mexico’s economy

Jam mañana

A frustrating start to the year

May 24th 2014 | MEXICO CITY | From the print edition

SO FAR this year Mexico’s government has resembled one of the country’s many devotees of St Jude, patron saint of lost causes. It has doggedly stuck to a 3.9% 2014 growth forecast, even though its main export market, the United States, has been sluggish, and the twin pillars of its domestic economy—buying and building—have fared even worse.

On May 21st the central bank revised its growth prediction down to 2.3-3.3%, from 3-4% previously. The government was expected finally to follow suit on May 23rd, when first-quarter GDP figures were due to be released. Even so, officials are convinced that within months the benefits of its plans to modernise the economy will start to show up in the numbers.

Mexicans have good reason to be sceptical.

More, HERE.

Copyright © The Economist Newspaper Limited 2013. All rights reserved.

The Guardian

Snowden voted person of the year
Edward Snowden
In May Edward Snowden flew to Hong Kong where he gave journalists the material which blew the lid on the extent of US digital spying. Photograph: The Guardian/AFP/Getty Images

 

For the second year in a row, a young American whistleblower alarmed at the unfettered and at times cynical deployment of power by the world's foremost superpower has been voted the Guardian's person of the year.

Edward Snowden, who leaked an estimated 200,000 files that exposed the extensive and intrusive nature of phone and internet surveillance and intelligence gathering by the US and its western allies, was the overwhelming choice of more than 2,000 people who voted.

The NSA whistleblower garnered 1,445 votes. In a distant second, from a list of 10 candidates chosen by Guardian writers and editors, came Marco Weber and Sini Saarela, the Greenpeace activists who spearheaded the oil rig protest over Russian Arctic drilling. They received 314 votes. Pope Francis gained 153 votes, narrowly ahead of blogger and anti-poverty campaigner Jack Monroe, who received 144.
Snowden's victory was as decisive as Chelsea Manning's a year earlier.

More, HERE.

© 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.

latimes.com

Click on HERE to get the latest Los Angeles Times News

The Subway Gangs of Mexico City: VIDEO

Crime Reports in the Streets of Los Angeles

Missing Mexico students: 'We want them alive,' L.A. activists chant

Thousands protest in Mexico against corruption, missing students

Democrats applaud Obama's move; Republicans don't

In L.A., relief and joy greet Obama's immigration plan

Esmeralda Bermudez, Anh Do, Brittny Mejia

"Finally," says Martha Alvarado, 27, a student from El Salvador. Like her, many who gathered downtown sighed with relief. Others seeking broader reform protested.

In Denver church, one immigrant resists deportation order

David Kelly

Arturo Hernandez has spent the last month in a church basement not far from the state Capitol here, doing puzzles, reading and fretting over his future.

On immigration policy, the law and facts are on Obama's side

Erwin Chemerinsky and Samuel Kleiner

Editorial: For many living under threat of deportation, Obama offers relief

Obama plan offers deportation relief for up to 5 million

More charges filed against suspect in San Fernando Valley shootings

Home fire kills 2 children while their pregnant mom is in hospital

Silicon Valley lukewarm to Obama's immigration reform moves

President's move could derail GOP agenda

Suit filed against Torrance rehab center in fatal drunk driving case

Immigration decree could shield hundreds of thousands in California illegally

Gunman killed after shootings on Florida State campus

Man wrongfully convicted of Ventura County killing to be released

Redlands firefighter arrested in death of love interest's husband

O.C. prostitution fight focuses on shaming of johns

Cosby in role of outcast after sex allegations

Obama's immigration plans hard to block, legal experts say
David G. Savage

The president is poised to announce what is likely to be his most ambitious and controversial plan to address the immigration issue, offering temporary reprieve from deportation to as many as 5 million additional immigrants.

In Russia, early African American migrants found the good life

Missing Honduras beauty queen, sister found dead

Japan's 2011 earthquake and nuclear disaster still fracturing families

Kentucky 'dark-money' group grew rapidly in 2014 election cycle

State can't make sex offenders give authorities their Internet IDs

Netflix postpones Bill Cosby special as rape allegations escalate

The announcement by Netflix came just hours after model and TV host Janice Dickinson accused Cosby of sexually assaulting her in 1982.

Restaurants are feeling the heat in crackdown on wage theft

Wall of snow slams Buffalo, N.Y., as cold strikes much of U.S.
Javier Panzar, Lauren Raab

New York police detain man in subway shoving death

Missouri executes man for 1994 gas station killing

Masked men set off clashes with police in Hong Kong

Using a metal barricade as a battering ram, masked men smashed through a window at Hong Kong's Legislative Council headquarters early Wednesday, setting off clashes with police.

American tourist accused of trying to ship Thai body parts

Slain Bell Gardens mayor battled public injustices, personal demons

LAPD study focused on small part of discipline system

Small town with several detention centers debates if it needs another

California students in high-poverty schools lose learning time, study says

As Iran nuclear talks near deadline, surprise deal is still possible

Elderly couple escapes injury when small jet crashes into home near Midway

Japanese prime minister to call snap election, put off sales tax hike

Ebola patient who died received ZMapp late in his treatment

Four worshipers killed in attack on Jerusalem synagogue
Batsheva Sobelman, Laura King

In the most serious attack in Jerusalem in years, two men armed with axes, knives and firearms stormed a synagogue Tuesday, killing at least four worshipers and injuring others before a police officer shot and killed the assailants, authorities said.

Police killing, beating of civilians raise issue of reasonable force

Deputies fatally shoot two suspects in East L.A.

Armed motorist at large after being shot at by Pasadena police

Pasadena police shot at a motorist who pulled out a gun during a routine traffic stop early Sunday morning before fleeing, authorities said.

No other suspects sought in East L.A. shooting that left two dead

Man shoots, kills brother during brawl, deputies say

Pope Francis confirms he'll visit Philadelphia next year

Halliburton to purchase oilfield competitor Baker Hughes

Brown seeks campaign donations despite apparent surplus

CIA intelligence gap hinders counter-terrorism efforts in Syria, Iraq

Martin Salia, doctor treated for Ebola in Nebraska, dies

Dr. Martin Salia, who contracted Ebola in Sierra Leone and was being treated at a Nebraska hospital, has died, a hospital spokesman confirmed Monday.

Japan enters unexpected recession as sales tax hike takes toll

Obama's Asia tour relaunches his efforts on 'legacy' issues
Christi Parsons

But awaiting Obama in Washington are Republican leaders already preparing to curb his ambitions on climate, immigration and other issues the president has said he'll act on without lawmakers.

Police killing, beating of civilians raise issue of reasonable force

Islamic State claims it has beheaded U.S. aid worker
Patrick J. McDonnell

In a nearly 16-minute video uploaded to social networks on Sunday, a black-clad militant stands before a severed head that he claims is that of American Peter Kassig.

Australia left to cringe once again at a leader's awkward moment

With high winds expected, more firefighters to be sent to wildfire-prone areas

Alaska volcanic eruption intensifies; lava advances in Hawaii

Flour products tainted by salmonella are recalled

As Ebola scare dies down in U.S., infectious disease preparations wane
Matt Hansen

As nationwide alarm over Ebola begins to fade, hospital officials and public health professionals are trying to ensure that lessons learned don't disappear along with it.

L.A. Unified fires lawyer who said girl could consent to sex with teacher

LAPD 'most wanted' fugitive found through Facebook

Google search for long missing dad leads to Homicide Report

Large manhunt underway for armed robbery suspect in South LA

A large manhunt was underway Friday night for an armed robbery suspect in the area of 70th Street and Figueroa Street in South Los Angeles.

Husband who poisoned his wife with nicotine gets life in prison

Off-duty San Diego officer fatally shoots attacking brother, cops say

At long last, a victor in Alaska governor's race: incumbent loses

Man found stabbed to death inside Garden Grove tea house

Obama tells Australian audience that U.S. is committed to Asia-Pacific

Women sentenced to 6-year terms in fatal Santa Ana nightclub beating

Federal judges order California to expand prison releases

Saying officials failed to comply with an order to grant many two-time felons early parole, federal judges on Friday said the state must quickly launch hearings that could free those inmates

Venice Boulevard exit of 10 Freeway closed after body found

Top U.S. general in Iraq amid Islamic State airstrike campaign

Associated Press

The unannounced visit from Army Gen. Martin Dempsey comes two days after he tells Congress the U.S. will consider sending ground troops to fight with Iraqi troops

L.A. Unified says girl, 14, could consent to sex with teacher

Secret Service agent took personal call while intruder jumped White House fence

A Homeland Security report cites several failures by the Secret Service that contributed to the man's intrusion into the executive mansion.

Back Story: What happened in Michael Brown shooting in Ferguson, Mo.?

Swamped with dependency cases, law center may refuse young clients

Colombia peace negotiator warns FARC rebels

Ex-cop in killing rampage last year stalked LAPD chief's father

23 labor protesters arrested outside Wal-Mart in Pico Rivera

Dorner report finds concerns over bias within LAPD
Joel Rubin, Jack Leonard

An LAPD review of its discipline system, prompted by the Dorner killings, finds widespread concerns from officers and civilians that the agency discriminates based on gender, ethnicity and rank.

Rain barely made a dent in California drought

Boy, 14, on scooter killed during police pursuit in Northern California

November 12, 2014

Authorities are looking for a driver who they say struck and killed a 14-year-old Northern California boy on a scooter during a police pursuit.

The boy, identified as Ivan Cruz, was with friends about 6:20 p.m. Tuesday crossing the street on his scooter when the driver, who was being chased by deputies, hit him and continued driving, said Sgt. Ray Kelly of the Alameda County Sheriff's Department.

Deputies stopped to help the San Leandro boy while other law enforcement officers followed the driver, who eventually got away.

"This whole thing has really impacted the community," Kelly said. "We are just trying to keep things together."

Deputies were attempting to stop the driver for reckless driving, but he sped up for several blocks, Kelly said.

Ivan was in a crosswalk at East 14th Street and Ashland Avenue when the driver hit him at an unknown speed, according to the California Highway Patrol.

He was taken to Eden Hospital in Castro Valley, where he was pronounced dead.

Grief counselors were sent to San Lorenzo High School, where Ivan was a freshman.

The Sheriff's Department, he said, is devastated by Ivan's death.

"He comes from a nice family," Kelly said. "He has a lot of friends."

More, HERE.

California can't challenge ruling on concealed guns, court says

One person killed in Paramount crash, street racing suspected

South L.A. frustrated by police secrecy in 2 deaths

India doctor arrested, denies role in sterilization deaths

U.N. human rights investigators denied entry to Israel for Gaza inquiry

Israel says it will deny entry to representatives of the U.N. Human Rights Council who are investigating potential war crimes committed during the summer's 50-day war between Israel and Hamas.

U.S.-China climate deal already under fire

Student borrowing is down as tuition rises more slowly, study finds

Mexico & the Americas

Report says Mexico leader was given mansion by train entrepreneur

Obama urges net neutrality; Ted Cruz calls it 'Obamacare for the Internet'
Jim Puzzanghera

The president's recommendation includes a call for the controversial step of changing the way the law treats broadband providers so they're subject to stricter utility-like regulation.

Obamacare sign-up projections

GM appeared to place hurried ignition switch order before recall

Missing hikers found, appear unharmed after spotted by helicopter crew

Man found dead at UC Berkeley frat house; police investigating

Science

Heat, drought worsen smog, stalling decades of progress

Young father slain at Altadena burger stand 'not some street thug'

CALIFORNIAL.A. Archdiocese is steps ahead of Catholic debate over homosexuality

A man suffered life-threatening injuries Sunday after running back into his fiery Van Nuys apartment to rescue his beloved cat, officials said.

L.A. County's unclaimed dead: How we reported the story

Earthquake: 4.1 quake strikes near Avalon, Calif.

Pedestrian struck on PCH

The Pentagon says the overnight U.S. aerial assault struck Al Qaeda-linked extremists that U.S. authorities call the Khorasan Group.

Civil War hero awarded Medal of Honor in White House ceremony

Former MLB pitcher Brad Halsey, 33, dies in fall from cliff

Average 30-year mortgage rate rises above 4%

Man gets prison term for pimping teen girl across Southern California

Fox exec's killers believed to have been acting under orders

Family dog destroyed after ripping off toddler's ear

Halloween crash victim was Irvine lawyer, devoted father

The GOP grabs the six seats it needed to put Minority Leader Mitch McConnell in charge of the chamber and give the party complete control of Congress.

SEE THE STORY

Analysis: GOP triumph is tempered by sobering realities

Top Republican strategists warn that the barriers to a GOP victory in a presidential election remain formidable.

Brown coasts to historic fourth term

Palestinian rams van into crowd at Jerusalem train station

Nail salon owner in O.C. pleads guilty to attempted pimping

California voters decisively elected Gov. Jerry Brown to a historic fourth term Tuesday, a rare bright spot for Democrats on a night when Republicans celebrated huge

victories in the rest of the nation.

Several arrested in fatal Halloween hit-and-run in Santa Ana
Louis Sahagun

Twin sisters Lexia and Lexandra Perez, 13, and their friend Andrea Gonzalez, also 13, were struck on Friday by a driver 'going at a high rate of speed.'

On Halloween night, four pedestrian deaths in Orange County

Eyewitnesses to Halloween hit-and-run describe violent collision

Memorial set up for teens killed on Halloween night in Santa AnaAl Qaeda-linked group drives back U.S.-supported fighters in Syria

Smuggling boat sinks off of Turkey, killing at least 24 migrants

British banker charged with killing two women in Hong Kong

'Pilot error' may have contributed to SpaceShipTwo's crash, NTSB says

Officials deny Ferguson no-fly zone was designed to keep out media

Man fatally shoots wife, then himself during child-custody exchange

A 50-year-old Mission Viejo man shot and killed his wife before taking his own life Friday night during a child-custody exchange, Orange County sheriff’s officials said.

Long Beach police shoot, kill suspect in home invasion

Earthquake: 3.4 quake strikes near El Centro

Nationwide blackout in Bangladesh ends

Rocket likely focus of Virgin Galactic crash probe; pilots identified

Lieutenant governor's race a painfully familiar story to Calif. GOP

Crash, pilot's death hit home for commercial space industry

Scientists sound the alarm in climate change report

The U.N. report says the effects of global warming are already being felt in rising sea levels, ocean acidification and more extreme weather events, especially heat waves and droughts.

Copyright 2014

MICHAEL MOORE

 

You Tube

Nixon before resignation and full speech, August 8, 1974

Protests in response to Israel’s assault on Gaza have drawn hundreds — and in some cases thousands — around the world.

 

Megyn Kelly To Dick Cheney: 'History Has Proven' You Were Wrong on Iraq Dick Cheney Kelly File.

 

You Tube

'Citizen Koch' ... the movie they didn't want you to see

Meet Governor(s) Pay-to Pay

 

Charles Baker, GOP nominee for governor in Massachusetts, gave $10,000 to New Jersey's Republican State Committee and hosted a fundraiser for Chris Christie – which happens to be flagrantly illegal, since Baker worked for a venture capital firm that shortly thereafter got a contract to manage New Jersey public pension funds

SPIEGEL ONLINE

Inside TAO: Documents Reveal Top NSA Hacking Unit

By SPIEGEL Staff

 

The article you are reading originally appeared in German in issue 1/2014 (December 30, 2013) of DER SPIEGEL.

 

Targeting Mexico

 

Mexico's Secretariat of Public Security, which was folded into the new National Security Commission at the beginning of 2013, was responsible at the time for the country's police, counterterrorism, prison system and border police. Most of the agency's nearly 20,000 employees worked at its headquarters on Avenida Constituyentes, an important traffic artery in Mexico City. A large share of the Mexican security authorities under the auspices of the Secretariat are supervised from the offices there, making Avenida Constituyentes a one-stop shop for anyone seeking to learn more about the country's security apparatus.

 

More, HERE.

Fresh Leak on US Spying: NSA Accessed Mexican President's Email

By Jens Glüsing, Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

 

'Royal Concierge': GCHQ Monitors Diplomats' Hotel Bookings

 

By Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

Quantum Spying: GCHQ Used Fake LinkedIn Pages to Target Engineers

Oil Espionage: How the NSA and GCHQ Spied on OPEC

Belgacom Attack: Britain's GCHQ Hacked Belgian Telecoms Firm

Cyber Attack: Belgians Angered by British Spying

By Gregor Peter Schmitz in Brussels

 

© SPIEGEL ONLINE 2013, All Rights Reserved

Fox News

US intelligence assets in Mexico reportedly tied to murdered DEA agent

SCM's Travel Advisory:


September 11 attacks on World Trade Center by Wikipedia

 

Mexicans are advised to exercise MAXIMUM CAUTION, monitor developments that might affect your safety in the United States because of Hate Crimes. The FBI reports that hate crimes against Latinos rose almost 40 percent between 2003 and 2006, and Hispanic activists say they are being targeted with threats and intimidation.

This is just a recent incident: STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- A rash of recent assaults on Mexican immigrants has heightened tensions in Port Richmond, already on edge following the savage beating of a 25-year-old baker earlier this (April 2010) month.

 

In addition, no matter what your nationality the US in under permanent risk of terrorism. Visitors could be caught up in attacks targeted at American, British, Canadian, Australian citizens, others. Terrorists may attack official or civilian targets. Crime rates are higher in the larger cities, such as New York, Los Angeles and Chicago.

 

Many parts of the United States are subject to different natural hazards, including earthquakes, fires or wildfires, floods, extreme heat, hurricanes, landslides and debris flow (mudslides), thunderstorms and lightning, tornadoes, tsunamis, volcanoes (Hawaii, Alaska and Pacific Northwest), winter storms (freezing rain, heavy snow and blizzards) and extreme cold.

 

Tourists are often targeted for petty crimes such as pick-pocketing and theft, particularly on public transport. It is recommended that before visiting your destination point, Google it and write NAME OF CITY TO BE VISITED, then "crime, areas to be avoided & gang activities" to determine your level of threat.  

Come Back Alive, a site dedicated to Dangerous Countries writes on quote: 

"There are more than 200 million guns in the possession of Americans. Most violent acts in the States are the result of robberies, domestic disputes and drug-related violence.

 

Terrorist acts, ranging from the killing of abortionist doctors to the bombing of the World Trade Center, are highly publicized but not considered a real threat to travelers. The threat of robbery or violent crime in inner cities and some tourist areas is real and should be taken seriously. Travel in America is considered safe (by .. Americans), and danger is confined to random violence and inner cities.

 

Those seeking adventure can find it in a New Orleans bar at five in the morning or strolling through South Central L.A. after midnight." .. 

TRAVEL ADVISORY: The Southern Poverty Law Center counted 932 active hate groups in the United States in 2009. Only organizations and their chapters known to be active during 2009 are included. More, HERE.

Oct. 29, 2009 Washington Post: Obama signs hate crimes law

You Tube

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HATE CRIMES

RACISM AND ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION, by ABC News

MEXICAN HATE RALLY

The New Sport: Latino Hate Crime, ABC News

Mexican beaten by 3 racist Blacks on Staten Island, New York

US Border Patrol Agent Shoots Dead Mexican Teen on Mexican Soil

Border agent details immigrant abuse

Discrimination Against Latinos

American Heritage- KKK Lynching

 

Redneck Attacks Mexican flag

 

-------------------------------------------

TERRORISM, DRUGS

New report exposes CIA torture & rendition by Nick Harper

MUST-READ Book: Cocaine Politics by Peter Dale Scott

Drugs and the Economy - Peter Dale Scott

Gary Webb on C.I.A. Trafficking of Cocaine

CIA Torture Jet crashed with 4 Tons of COCAINE

Former LA Police Officer Mike Ruppert Confronts CIA Director

'I don't think drug trafficking will ever be stopped': Inside the world of the U.S. agent who went undercover with the cartels:

Mail Online, UK

Celerino Castillo, by Wikipedia

Powderburns

Marijuana legalization wins majority support in poll: Los Angeles Times

Marijuana, Officially Legal in Colorado

In 2006, former Mexican president Felipe Calderón launched a massive crackdown against drug trafficking organizations, in conjunction with the United States. Since then, more than 40,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence: Council On

Foreign Relations

Washington State Gears Up for Marijuana Industry: Voice of America

Marijuana Legalization Canada: Liberal Party Lays Out Detailed Economic Plan For Pot: The Huffington Post, Canada

England Wants To Legalize Marijuana Through Cannabis Drug Reform: Inquisitr. Ltd.

More HERE.

A change of scenery by Washington Post

U.S. citizens traveling internationally in 2012, by destination

A change of scenery
Source: Office of Travel and Tourism Industries, Commerce Department. The Washington Post. Published on May 24, 2013

Image Credit

 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF STATE

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling to certain places in Mexico due to threats to safety and security posed by organized criminal groups in the country.  U.S. citizens have been the target of violent crimes, such as kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery by organized criminal groups in various Mexican states.  For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, which can vary, travelers should reference the state-by-state assessments further below.  This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

General Conditions: 

Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year for study, tourism, and business, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day.  The Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations, and there is no evidence that organized criminal groups have targeted U.S. visitors or residents based on their nationality.  Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that are reported in the border region or in areas along major trafficking routes. 

Nevertheless, U.S. travelers should be aware that the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter organized criminal groups that engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico.  The groups themselves are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity.  Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur anywhere.

More, HERE.

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The New York Times

From Frommer's

Introduction to Mexico
The Best Cultural Experiences
The Best Beach Vacations
The Best Active Vacations
The Best Places to Get Away from It All
Getting There
Getting Around
Fast Facts
In One Week
In Two Weeks

MEXICO POPULAR DESTINATIONS 

See All 37 Destinations

Acapulco

Baja California

Cabo San Lucas

Campeche

Cancun

Chichen Itza

Colima

Mexico City

Yucatan Peninsula

MORE MEXICO TRAVEL, HERE.

© 2013 The New York Times Company

The Naturalization Process and Current Trends in Immigration in the United States: By Gender, By Age and By Marital Status

In 2011, the total number of persons naturalizing was 694,193. The leading countries of birth of new citizens were Mexico (94,783), India (45,985), the Philippines (42,520), the People's Republic of China (32,864), and Colombia (22,693). The largest number of persons naturalizing lived in California (151,183), Florida (87,309), and New York (76,603).

Historical trends have shown that the average number of persons that are naturalized annually has increased from less than 120,000 during the 1950s and 1960s to 210,000 during the 1980s, to 500,000 during the 1990s, and to 680,000 between 2000 and 2009. Naturalizations rose sharply during the mid-1990s because of various factors that include: 1) the 2.7 million undocumented immigrants legalized under the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 making them eligible for citizenship; 2) legislative efforts to restrict public benefits for non-citizens; and 3) the implementation of a mandatory program requiring replacement of permanent resident cards issued before 1977.

More, HERE.

 

Information submitted by Cooper Brimm, American Immigration Center

16 Ways to Get Through the Airport Faster

With airports that seem busier than ever, airline staffing reductions creating longer lines at check-in and airport security wait times that can be entirely unpredictable, these days the old airport "two-hour" rule often leaves just minutes to spare to buy a magazine, grab a snack or hustle your kids into the bathroom. Saving a few extra minutes here and there along the way can add up in your favor; here are 16 tips to get you from your front door to your seat on the plane as quickly and painlessly as possible -- as well as some ideas to keep you moving no matter what is going on with your flight.

More, HERE

© 2013 The Independent Traveler, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

15 Travel Tips to Get Through TSA Security


The savviest of travelers understand the security requirements and plan ahead. In the United States, airport security is run by the Transportation Security Administration, a division of the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees border security as well as technological research, response to national disasters and terrorism, and intelligence analysis.

 

These tips reflect TSA policies as of November 2012. And for students enrolled in a homeland security program, knowing this information is vital and applicable to your future career.

 

More, HERE.

 

© 2013, Master of Homeland Security

COMMUNITY NEWS

Autos con 15 Años de Antiguedad Dejarán de Circular en el D. F. Dos Veces a la Semana

http://www.solucionpolitica.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/hoy-no-circula.jpg

CREDITO DE LA IMAGEN: SOLUCION POLITICA

 

Cars Older than 15 Years will not circulate twice a Week
Tanya Müller García
Tanya Muller García, Secretaria del Medio Ambiente del Distrito Federal

 

Mexico City's Environment Secretariat

HOY NO CIRCULA

New Program of (Your Car) Does not Circulate in Mexico City. More information, HERE by Wikipedia

S P E C I A L   A N N O U N C E M E N T
Olivier Tschumi
Olivier Tschumi, a Swiss citizen, relocated to Mexico 22 years ago. He was kidnapped while jogging with his two dogs in a park north of Cuernavaca in the morning of December 19, 2010. A ransom was paid to the kidnappers on December 21 of same year, but Olivier continues to be in captivity to this date. Authorities have no leads to the kidnappers.

Security Corner in Mexico has been requested by Mr. Tschumi's family in Switzerland to have this information available to our readers in the event you happen to know or hear of Olivier's whereabouts. The Mexican Federal Attorney General's Office (PGR) is offering $5 million pesos as a reward to anybody providing information that will lead to the whereabouts of Mr. Tschumi

If you have any information, please write to Olivier's sister ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). Olivier has a 12-year old waiting to hear from you too. More information, in Spanish HERE
-----------------------------------------------
Olivier Tschumi, citoyen suisse, s'est installé au Mexique il y a 22 ans. Au matin du 19 décembre 2010,  Il a été enlevé  lors d'un jogging avec ses deux chiens dans une forêt au nord de Cuernavaca. Une rançon a été payée selon les exigences des ravisseurs le 21 décembre de la même année. Olivier n'a pas été libéré, il a disparu depuis ce jour. L'enquête, menée par les  autorités mexicaines piétine.  Désespérée, la famille Tschumi en Suisse implore l'aide de tout le monde pour retrouver Olivier. Toute information concernant les ravisseurs et  sa localisation sera utile et  bienvenue. La famille d'Olivier a grand besoin de votre aide et vous remercie.

Le Bureau du procureur général fédéral mexicain offre $ 5.000.000 pesos en récompense à qui fournira des informations conduisant à retrouver Monsieur Tschumi. Si vous avez des informations, s'il vous plaît écrivez à la sœur d'Olivier, Email:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Olivier a une fille de 12 ans qui espère retrouver son papa grâce à votre aide! Plus d'informations en espagnol ICI


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Culture of Safe Travel, Crime & Loss Prevention

 

VIDEOS

 

INTRODUCTION (English language) 

INTRODUCCION A ESQUINA DE LA SEGURIDAD


PREVENTING KIDNAPPING EXPRESS IN MEXICO CITY

MEXICO CITY SUBWAY SYSTEM, SAFE, EFFICIENT, INEXPENSIVE


WORDS OF ADVISE FROM SUBWAY SECURITY PERSONNEL

 

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Mexico City Hash House Harriers

 

INTERNATIONAL DRINKING Jarra CLUB WITH A RUNNING PROBLEM

www.mchhh.com

--------------------------

www.mchhh.com

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SOCIAL SERVICES

 

Cuernavaca's Center for Happy Sr. Citizens, contributing to the enhancement of life quality. Monday to Friday: 8AM to 14:00 hrs. Among other courses specially designed for the elderly: literature, history, philosophy, IT, English, Spanish, artistic workshops: music, painting, cuisine, manual art; sports and entertainment: dancing, zumba, danzon, yoga, aqua-aerobics, reading. Emotions' handling, conferences, legal advise for inheritance, tanatology.

More information: Río Amacuzac 435, Col. Vistahermosa, tels. (01- 777) 221-6250(01- 777) 221-6250 (01- 777) 221-6250Contact person: Alejandra Morales Leija

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American Benevolent Society

 

American Benevolent Society Newsletter by American_Benevolent

Paseo de la Reforma 1870-201 Lomas de Chapultepec, Miguel Hidalgo. Mexico, D.F. 11000 Mexico

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New "HOY NO CIRCULA" rules go into effect Tuesday, July 1, 2014‏

 

Here's an explanation of how the new program "hoy no circula" works, starting TUESDAY, July 1st

 

If you have any information that is different from this PLEASE let us know right away so we can send it out. Brand new vehicles that have the hologram 00 are able to drive for two years, the car will have to update the hologram  at the expiration date and be inspected . You have two months after the expiration date to renew the hologram (have the car inspected).
Hologram 0, if your vehicle does not pass the 00 you will be given the hologram 0.  You can still drive everyday of the month, but instead of the two years permit, the expiration is set for six months, then you will have to renew the hologram. For information on the dates of the renewal, the link of the government will be posted at the end of the mail.
Hologram 1, this hologram is usually for vehicles between 9 and 15 years of usage. the vehicles with the hologram number 1 will not be able to circulate two Saturdays a month and one day on midweek. (the Saturday depends on the license plate of the car, see the government link for more details) and one day on midweek that also depends on the license plate of the car.

And there will be the new hologram 2.

According to the news of El Universal vehicles with the hologram number 2 that are over 15 years in circulation will not be able to circulate any Saturday of the month and also one day midweek.

 

It seems that the government is willing to change the hologram 2 for the hologram 1 if the vehicles pass the regulation test. This regulation will start on Tuesday July 1st. of 2014.  For more details here is the link of the news. And here is the link for the government program "Hoy no circula"

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