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The Post Wins Pulitzer For Reporting On Secret Service Security Lapses; Clintons' Wealth Intertwined With Charitable Work; Joy, Anger For Family Of Mexican Girl Wrongly Sent To U. S.; AP PHOTOS: Annual Fair Delights On Mexico City Outskirts
Thursday, 02 April 2015 08:41

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The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners - Public Service

For a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper or news site through the use of its journalistic resources, including the use of stories, editorials, cartoons, photographs, graphics, videos, databases, multimedia or interactive presentations or other visual material, a gold medal. Awarded to The Washington Post for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security. and Awarded to The Guardian US for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, helping through aggressive reporting to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.

Finalists also nominated as a finalist in this category was Newsday, Long Island, N.Y., for its use of in-depth reporting and digital tools to expose shootings, beatings and other concealed misconduct by some Long Island police officers, leading to the formation of a grand jury and an official review of police accountability.

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INTERNATIONAL

40 years after Vietnam War, children of U.S. servicemen still left behind

A DNA database may be the last chance to link Amerasians
with their fathers.

The Post wins Pulitzer for reporting on Secret Service security lapses

The Post wins Pulitzer for reporting <br /> on Secret Service security lapsesPaul Farhi

Carol D. Leonnig was honored for her series of bombshell stories, which shook the faith in the agency.

Read Leonnig’s work | List of winners, finalists

Post reporter jailed in Iran faces 4 charges including espionage

An indictment is said to allege that Jason Rezaian provided information to “individuals with hostile intent.”


Post editor’s statement: Charges are ‘absurd’

Clintons’ wealth intertwined with charitable work

Rosalind S. Helderman

A Post analysis found that Bill Clinton has gotten $26 million in speaking fees from groups that are also major donors to the Clinton Foundation, putting an unusual twist on Hillary Clinton’s campaign.

Clinton: Benghazi deaths politicized

5 takeaways from Clinton in N.H.

Secret Service delayed fixing alarm at ex-president’s home

Some felt the 13-month delay put former president George H.W. Bush’s safety at risk, according to a report by the Department of Homeland Security’s inspector general.

Baltimore residents aim outrage at city leaders after police-custody death


Protesters chant in Baltimore on Wednesday. (Jabin Botsford/Post)

Paul Schwartzman

The fact that the mayor and the police chief are both black didn’t stop protesters from expressing their distrust after the death of an African American man who was under arrest.

Petraeus set to plead guilty to mishandling classified materials

Under a plea deal, the former CIA director will face a probationary period but no prison time.

New Pa. governor on crusade to fix the nation’s most inequitable schools

New Pa. governor on crusade to fix the nation’s most inequitable schools

Tom Wolf became the only Democrat last year to unseat a GOP governor after pledging to hike school funding.

Jury: Ex-Iowa lawmaker not guilty of sexually abusing wife with dementia

Jury: Ex-Iowa lawmaker not guilty of sexually abusing wife with dementia

Prosecutors said his wife, who lives in a nursing home, wasn’t mentally capable of consenting to sex.

4 Pinocchios for Sherrod Brown’s invented George H.W. Bush quote

4 Pinocchios for Sherrod Brown’s invented George H.W. Bush quote

FACT CHECKER | The Ohio senator has been putting words in the mouth of the former president for years.

For $45, anyone anywhere could be a freshman at Arizona State University

Students can take classes online for a fee, then decide whether to pay reduced tuition for the credits.

Marchers gather near site of Freddie Gray’s arrest

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MEXICO NEWS

Image Credit

When a woman in Texas claimed that Alondra Luna Nunez was her long-lost daughter, the girl's real parents in Mexico say they presented more than a dozen documents from baptismal records and a copy of her birth certificate to family photographs. They were sure it was enough to demonstrate her true origins.
A 14-year-old Mexican girl who was taken by authorities and sent screaming to live in the United States was returned home Wednesday after DNA tests showed she is not the daughter of the Houston woman who claimed her.
The multi-colored lights of the mechanical rides cast a pastel glow on the evening sky, three children pose on the back of a Brahman bull, and a tuba blasts a Norteno beat as thousands of people enjoy the annual spring fair just west of Mexico City.
Migrants' protest convoy reaches Mexico City with complaints

About 200 participants in a protest convoy of Central American migrants arrived in Mexico's capital Saturday and filed abuse complaints with the government's National Human Rights Commission.

Toyota plans to build new auto assembly plants in Mexico and China, ending a self-imposed 3-year break from expansion over quality concerns due to massive recalls.
Mexican security officials said Sunday they have captured the man who has led the Juarez drug cartel following last year's arrest of Vicente Carrillo Fuentes.

Mexico Water Commission chief resigns over helicopter flap

The director of Mexico's National Water Commission resigned Thursday following an uproar over his family's use of an agency helicopter to reach Mexico City's airport.

A five-state alert is on after Mexican thieves steal radioactive material.
Mexican authorities have issued an alert for five states over the theft of a container of hazardous radioactive material used for industrial inspection in the country's southeast.
From hundreds of public readings in Mexico to an exhibit in Bogota displaying the typewriter off which flew the pages of "One Hundred Years of Solitude," fans of Gabriel Garcia Marquez honored the Nobel laureate Friday on the one-year anniversary of his death.
Mexico's Congress has approved freedom of information legislation that will allow public access to data from almost any entity that receives government funding.

A blanket of fog lifts, exposing a band of rainbow sheen that stretches for miles off the coast of Louisiana. From the vantage point of an airplane, it's easy to see gas bubbles in the slick that mark the spot where an oil platform toppled during a 2004 hurricane, triggering what might be the longest-running commercial oil spill ever to pollute the Gulf of Mexico.

Toyota plans to build new auto assembly plants in Mexico and China, ending a self-imposed 3-year break from expansion over quality concerns due to massive recalls.

Migrant rights activists said Tuesday that about 200 Central American migrants hope to re-start a journey to hold a "Viacrucis" protest in Mexico City, after highway immigration checkpoints stymied their trip last week.

The U.S. Treasury Department announced sanctions on Mexico's violent and growing Jalisco New Generation cartel a day after the gang mounted a bloody ambush that killed 15 Mexican police officers.
Supporters of ousted Mexican reporter Carmen Aristegui start a petition and legal moves to get her back on the air.
The director of Mexico's National Water Commission resigned Thursday following an uproar over his family's use of an agency helicopter to reach Mexico City's airport.
Replicas of a sculpture of a knotted pistol that was designed in honor of the late musician John Lennon are being displayed this month in Monterrey, a northern industrial city that knows about gun violence.
Foreign visitors are scarcer now. But domestic tourists are flooding into Acapulco for Easter weekend break.

Pemex begins to restore production at fire-damaged platform

Mexico's state-run oil company continues to search for three missing workers from a platform fireball that killed four others, while beginning to restore production at the damaged Gulf of Mexico facility, officials said Sunday.

Mexico's Pemex: 3 workers still missing after platform blaze

Three workers are missing following the huge blaze on an oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico that killed four workers and burned for hours, Mexico's state oil company said Thursday.

Search continues for missing Mexican oil platform workers after deadly fire

Pemex officials said that oil production will soon resume at damaged platform.

Mexico City officials said Thursday that recent filming for the upcoming James Bond movie "Spectre" was a business boon for the capital's colonial core, despite complaints over lost sales blamed on street closures.

Somebody is systematically poisoning the dogs of Hermosillo, an industrial city in northern Mexico, and not just strays: At least 64 dogs, all with owners, have died of a similar poison since mid-March. More stray animals have probably been killed, but had no one to file a complaint, authorities say.

Police have captured the purported head of a criminal gang believed to be responsible for kidnapping more than 100 people in southern Mexico, authorities said Friday.

A huge blaze twisted and blackened an oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico, but the state-run Pemex oil company said it managed to avert any significant oil spill.

A huge ball of flames engulfed an oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday, killing four people and sending terrified workers leaping into the sea.
Mexico has become the first developing nation to submit pollutant reduction goals for next fall's Paris climate change talks, pledging Friday to cut greenhouse gas and short-lived climate pollutants 25 percent by 2030.
Jeb Bush's wife, who had a stormy childhood in Mexico, has a personal history with political resonance.
A roundup of business news from around the world.

At least 4 killed in clash between Mexico vigilante groups

A clash between two vigilante "self-defense" groups in the troubled Mexican state of Guerrero killed at least four people and dozens more were taken prisoner by each side, a leader of one of the groups said Tuesday.

© 1996-2010 The Washington Post Company

OTTAWA CITIZEN

Canadian diplomat's son killed in Miami shootout over two pounds of marijuana

New Details Emerge on Mexican Finance Minister’s Property Deal

Records show government contractor didn’t make profit in sale of house to Luis Videgaray

The Nation

Why Is the US Still Spending Billions to Fund Mexico’s Corrupt Drug War?

LE MONDE

Qui est Hervé Falciani, le cauchemar de HSBC ?

LE MONDE | 09.02.2015  Par Fabrice Lhomme et Gérard Davet

Cet homme-là est un opportuniste, bien plus qu’un être multiple. Hervé Falciani peut certes endosser différents rôles, se complaire dans un langage abscons, pour mieux se cacher, peut-être, mais il a su, surtout, nager en eaux troubles, rebondir à chaque épreuve, profiter de toute possibilité. Il a été successivement informaticien, détrousseur de données sensibles, chevalier blanc, mythomane, manipulateur, lanceur d’alerte, puis victime du système, allez vousretrouver. Mais Hervé Falciani est d’abord, et cela, personne ne peut lui enlever, le pivot de l’incroyable affaire HSBC. Son géniteur. Après cinq années d’enquête, la lecture de milliers d’archives confidentielles, de témoignages inédits, Le Monde peut vous narrer la vraie vie de Falciani, le cauchemar vivant de la banque HSBC Private Bank.

Plus, ICI

HSBC, un écrin sur mesure pour le gotha du diamant

Les très protégés clients mystères de HSBC

« Nous publions les noms des personnalités dont la fraude est manifeste » 53

ICIJ : qui se cache derrière cette machine à scoops ?

© Le Monde.fr

Logo

Friday, February 6, 2015

61 bodies found in abandoned Mexican crematorium

Acapulco (Mexico), Feb 6 (IANS/EFE) A total of 61 bodies have been found at an abandoned crematorium in Acapulco, in the Mexican state of Guerrero, where in September last year 43 students went missing, officials from the public prosecutor's office reported Friday.
The discovery was made after residents from the neighbouring areas called the authorities, who reached the crematorium and recovered the human remains in forensic vehicles, as confirmed by Spanish news agency EFE.
According to the sources, the foul smell from the bodies caught the attention of nearby residents who alerted the authorities Thursday.
Apparently, the crematorium, the Cremaciones El Pacifico, had been abandoned about a year ago.
More, HERE.

Actualités
mardi 27 janvier, Sainte Angèle

Florence Cassez demande 36 millions de dollars au Mexique

Publié le 27/01/2015

International

Florence Cassez, détenue pendant sept ans au Mexique pour enlèvement, séquestration, délinquance organisée et détention d’armes à l’usage exclusif des forces armées, a entamé une action en justice auprès de la Cour suprême mexicaine pour obtenir 36 millions de dollars (environ 32 millions d’euros) de dommages et intérêts.
Selon l’avocat de la jeune femme, Me José Patiño Hurtado invité sur radio MVS, l’action en justice, lancée vendredi 23 janvier, visait l’ex-président mexicain Felipe Calderon (2006-2012), son ancien secrétaire particulier, l’actuel sénateur Roberto Gil, ainsi que les anciens ministres de la Sécurité publique, Genaro Garcia Luna, et de la Justice, Daniel Cabeza de Vaca. « Nous présentons une plainte pour dommage moral envers Florence Cassez, atteinte à ses sentiments, à sa réputation et à son honneur. Ils ont tué sa vie », a déclaré Me José Patiño Hurtado, qui a également estimé que l’ancien président Calderon, comme les autres personnalités visées, « était en charge et n'a pas empêché que soit commis l'illicite » contre Florence Cassez.

Une arrestation mise en scène de la police

L’action vise également la chaîne de télévision Televisa et un de ses présentateurs vedettes, Carlos Loret de Mola. Ils sont accusés d’avoir présenté comme une arrestation en direct une mise en scène de la police.
Plus, ICI

©LaDepeche.fr

REUTERS

Security chief in violent Mexican state steps down

MEXICO CITY Thu Jan 22, 2015
(Reuters) - Mexico's Interior Ministry said on Thursday that a top security official appointed to restore order in a restive western state has stepped down, a few weeks after new outbreaks of violence.
Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong said the federal government's security commissioner for Michoacan state, Alfredo Castillo, would take on a new role in the government, without giving any more details on the reasons for his departure.
Castillo was appointed commissioner a year ago in a bid to crush a powerful drug gang known as the Knights Templar which had taken control of large swathes of Michoacan, and later became embroiled in bloody clashes with vigilante groups.
More, HERE.
Copyright

Toronto Sun

Drug gang members ate human hearts: Mexican government

Gabriel Stargardter, Reuters; January 06, 2015 

MEXICO CITY - A vicious Mexican drug gang forced some members to eat the hearts of murder victims as part of a gruesome initiation rite to root out infiltrators, a government security official said on Tuesday, citing witness testimony.
For much of the past year, Michoacan, a mountainous, agricultural state in western Mexico, has been ravaged by fighting between drug gang henchmen and vigilantes who took up arms against the cartels but have since splintered into violent factions.
A mid-December shootout between two rival groups that killed 11 people has reignited fears the government is failing to control the state after flooding it with federal troops and pressing vigilantes into a fledgling rural police force.
More, HERE.
Copyright © 2015 All rights reserved

The Toronto Sun is a member of Canoe Sun Media Urban Newspapers.

Yahoo News

Security on agenda as embattled Mexican president visits Obama

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico's embattled President Enrique Pena Nieto will discuss security and justice with U.S. President Barack Obama in Washington next week amid public anger about how he has handled a probe into the apparent massacre of 43 trainee teachers.

Pena Nieto's standing has been battered by a string of massive street protests following the abduction and likely murder of 43 students by a drug gang working with corrupt police in the southwestern city of Iguala on the night of Sept. 26.

More, HERE.

Yahoo News Network

KREM2

December 31, 2014

VIDEO: Toddler fatally shot Blackfoot, ID mom at Hayden Walmart

Photo of Veronica Rutledge from her Facebook account.
Photo of Veronica Rutledge from her Facebook account. Family members granted KREM 2 permission to use the photo.(Photo: KREM)

HAYDEN, Idaho—A toddler shot and killed a Walmart shopper Tuesday morning in what deputies described as an "accident."

The woman was later identified by authorities said Veronica Rutledge from Blackfoot, Idaho. The father-in-law of Walmart shooting victim spoke with KREM 2 News Tuesday night. He called the shooting "tragic." He added the family "lost a beautiful, loving mother."

Walmart employees evacuated the Hayden store around 10:20 a.m. following the gunshot.
Deputies with the Kootenai County Sheriff's Office responded to the scene and found a 29-year-old woman dead inside the store.

Rutledge was shopping with four kids, when her two-year-old son reached into her purse, accessed her concealed 9mm Smith & Wesson M&P Shield semi-automatic handgun and accidentally discharged the weapon, according deputies. Authorities said the toddler was seated in the shopping cart when the gun was discharged. The woman and children were in the back of the store near the electronics area when the deadly shooting happened.

The bullet struck Mrs. Rutledge in the head, killing her instantly.

More, HERE.

© 2015 KREM, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, Inc.

GLOBAL RESEARCH

boston_bombing_Tsarnaev

Despite Dzhokhar Tsarnaev pleading not guilty, his lead defense attorney Judy Clark conceded to the jury that her client was guilty in her closing argument.The defense team insisted that he was coerced and bullied by his older brother into committing alleged acts of terrorism.

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VIDEO: Résoudre le mystère du WTC7

If the Saudis were indeed the State sponsors of 9/11, why on earth did the US and the Atlantic Alliance (under the doctrine of collective security) choose to wage a “Just War” of retribution against Afghanistan. Did they get there countries mixed up?
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Important Strike in Mexico: Farm Workers Paralyze Baja California Farms

By Dan La Botz; Global Research, April 03, 2015

Thousands of farmworkers in the San Quintín Valley of Baja California, just 185 miles south of the U.S. border, struck some 230 farms, including the twelve largest that dominate production in the region, on March 17 interrupting the picking, packing, and shipping of zucchini, tomatoes, berries and other products to stores and restaurants in the United States. The strikers, acting at the peak of the harvest, were demanding higher wages and other benefits to which they are legally entitled such as membership in the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS), the public health system. While there have over the last two decades been several large scale protests by workers in San Quintín, usually riots over the employers failure to pay their employees on time, this is the first attempt by workers to carry out a such strategic strike.

The farm workers reportedly succeeded within three days in negotiating with employers and the government an agreement of the existing unions, the Confederation of Mexican Workers (CTM) and the Regional Confederation of Workers of Mexico (CROM), both corrupt organizations affiliated with the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) that had colluded with employers to keep wages low. The agreement reached on March 20 will give the workers the right to create their own union and negotiate directly with the owners. If this agreement holds, it represents a tremendous achievement for these workers and establishes a precedent for other workers throughout Mexico who would like to get rid of their corrupt government- or employer- controlled unions. The strike and negotiations over wages and other issues continue.

More, HERE.
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US soldiers in Iraq

Arabs and Muslims are tacitly or openly portrayed as uncivilized subjects. Terrorism is deeply tied to images of Arabs and Muslims in the minds of many US citizens and this is why it is falsely believed that most terrorists are Arabs or Muslims.

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NSA and Facebook Work Together

By Kurt Nimmo, March 27, 2015

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Lies and Deceptions on the Left: The Politics of Self Destruction

By Prof. James Petras, March 22, 2015

petras

Over the past year, what appeared as hopeful signs, that Left governments were emerging as powerful alternatives to right-wing pro-US regimes, is turning into a historic rout, which will relegate them to the dustbin of history for many years to come.

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Costa Rican Ambassador Fired for Defending Venezuelan Government Amid Escalating Media War

By Lucas Koerner, March 27, 2015

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Flight 9525 Crash: What’s Religion Got To Do with It? German Co-Pilot as Terrorist

By Juan Cole, March 27, 2015

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George W. Bush: “My Dad Was Meeting with the Brother of Osama on September 11, 2001. Does That Make Him a Terror Suspect?”

By Prof Michel Chossudovsky, March 17, 2015
osama

Ironically, the anti-terrorist legislation does not apply to politicians in high office. Individuals can be arrested but presidents and prime ministers are allowed to mingle and socialize with family members of the World’s most renowned terrorist.

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THE KUALA LUMPUR INITIATIVE TO CRIMINALISE WAR

The Obama administration has embarked upon the ultimate war crime, a Worldwide military adventure, “a long war”, which threatens the future of humanity. The Pentagon’s global military design is one of world conquest.

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1984_270x453

The complete loss of constitutional civil liberties where we can be taken in without warrant, locked up for indefinite periods of time, those totalitarian Orwellian tactics are here today… in secret CIA-like “black site” locations throughout the nation

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Obama’s “Fake War” against the Islamic State (ISIS). The Islamic State is Protected by the US and its Allies

By Prof Michel Chossudovsky, February 19, 2015

ISIS made in USA

Why has the US Air Force not been able to wipe out the Islamic State which at the outset was largely equipped with conventional small arms not to mention state of the art Toyota pickup trucks?
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A Century of American Figurehead Presidents Marching to the Beat of Wall Street and the New World Order

By Joachim Hagopian, February 18, 2015

USA présidents

A chronicle of this last century’s presidents offers us Americans a greater understanding of the diminished role our figurehead presidents have played as a mere public face to the
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Boko Haram texte
The objectives of the US military presence in Africa are well documented: counter Chinese influence and control strategic locations and natural resources including oil reserves. This was confirmed more than 8 years ago by the US State Department
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Canada: Harper Government Relies on Torture Evidence, Say Three Professional Organizations

By Global Research, February 05, 2015 
In the wake of the December, 2014 release of the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee’s report on CIA torture, Prime Minister Harper said the report “has nothing to do whatsoever with the government of Canada.”

However, David Long, 9/11 survivor and creator of a petition submitted to Parliament December 3, 2014, disputes this claim.

The office of Steven Blaney, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, recently rejected this request for a Parliamentary review of the September 11, 2001 attacks.
The 1427 petitioners are dismayed that the key document setting forth the U.S. government’s account of the 9/11 events, the 2004 9/11 Commission Report, is based largely on testimony obtained through torture.
Their case was presented in a widely-viewed press conference held at Parliament December 10th by three academic organizations –  Rethink911.ca,  Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth and the9/11 Consensus Panel,
In his brief response to the petitioners, Mr. Blaney stated:
“The Government will not tolerate the waste of taxpayer dollars by studying conspiracy theories.”
More, HERE.
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Police Murders and the Criminalization of Protest in America

By Andre Damon; Global Research, February 01, 2015

On Friday, New York Police Department Commissioner William J. Bratton announced the formation of a 350-member paramilitary police unit specializing in “disorder control and counter-terrorism.” Bratton made clear the new unit would be used to crack down on political opposition. 

In his announcement, Bratton explicitly equated peaceful protests, protected under the First Amendment of the US constitution, with acts of terrorism and mass murder. The commissioner said the new unit will be “designed for dealing with events like our recent protests, or incidents like Mumbai or what just happened in Paris,” referring to the 2008 Mumbai, India attacks that killed 164 people and the recent shooting of 11 people at the offices of the French weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo 
The police commissioner made clear that members of the unit would be heavily armed. “Long rifles and machine guns… are unfortunately sometimes necessary,” he said. 
The announcement by Bratton, speaking for the Democratic administration of Mayor Bill de Blasio, makes clear that the official response to peaceful protests in Ferguson, Missouri and other cities is not to rein in police violence, but to intensify it, along with a further militarization of the police to deal with the broader social and political unrest to come.

More, HERE.
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MEXICO NEWS

Violence Intensifies in Mexico as Authorities Unearth 10 Headless Bodies

By Jake Dean; Global Research, January 13, 2015

Mexican police have unearthed ten decapitated bodies and eleven heads in unmarked graves Tuesday near the city of Chilapa de Alvarez, 31 miles east of Guerrero state’s capital, Chilpancingo. The bodies were found spread throughout six clandestine graves with their hands tied and showing signs of torture. The heads of the victims were discovered in another grave inside four plastic bags.

Prosecutors have yet to identify the victims and are attempting to find the eleventh body and to ascertain if the heads belong to the corpses found in the graves. An anonymous-tip off alerted the police to the graves. The remains have been taken to the Forensic Medical Service of Chilpancingo for identification.

The brutal methods used against these victims are all too familiar.

More, HERE.
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How Israeli High-Tech Security Firms Are Turning the U.S.-Mexico Border into a “New Kind of Hell”

U.S. borderlands are laboratories for nightmarish innovations.

More, HERE.
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International Court Calls on Mexico to Ban Genetically Modified Corn

By Ethan A. Huff;Global Research, January 16, 2015

Mexico is desperately trying to avoid a bioterrorism takeover by Big GMO, which is insistent upon ushering in genetically modified (GM) maize to replace the dozens of native corn varieties already grown throughout the country. 

The Mexican Chapter of the Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal has issued an urgent plea to the Mexican government to once and for all ban all plantings of GM maize in order to avoid catastrophic losses to the “center of origin and diversity of this staple crop.”

The ruling, which came after the Tribunal spent three years gathering evidence from more than 1,000 organizations on GMO safety and effectiveness, warns that GM maize threatens to contaminate Mexico’s roughly 60 native corn varieties. More than just a staple crop, corn is a cultural treasure of Mexico, and because there is already a natural diversity of it, corn grows exceptionally well without the need for genetic alterations.

More, HERE.
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Obama Backs Beleaguered Mexican President Peña Nieto

“NAFTA-Land Security”: How Canada and Mexico Have Become Part of the U.S. Policing Regime

By Paul Ashby; Global Research, December 04, 2014
National Guard PFC monitors one of dozens of cameras on the border with Mexico at the Border Patrol’s Communications Center in Arizona (U.S. Army / Creative Commons)
During this summer’s child migrant crisis and the accompanying frenzy around “security” along the U.S.-Mexico boundary, a spotlight was shone on Mexico’s role in protecting the U.S. “homeland.” It helped illuminate what Washington considers the United States’ territorial boundaries: those of the countries associated with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In other words, the territories of Canada and Mexico are part of the U.S. policing regime, under a regional security framework we might call “NAFTA-land Security.”
Evidence of this emerged in July when a Congressional hearing featured a discussion on, as Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) put it, “what Mexico is actually doing to help us” regarding the unauthorized movement of Central American children. Some lawmakers and officials hinted that insufficient efforts by Mexican authorities made possible the unwanted migrants’ northward movement through Mexico.
In response, administration officials pointed to Mexican President Peña Nieto’s new southern border strategy, one that, as Todd Miller has written, involves the exportation of the U.S. border policing model to Mexico.
More, HERE.
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More Beheaded Bodies Discovered in Southern Mexico

Disappeared Students in Mexico: Global Struggle for Ayotzinapa Captures World’s Attention

By Telesur Global Research, November 22, 2014
More than 200 actions were carried out Thursday, coinciding with Mexico’s Day of Revolution.

A student’s skin was peeled over his head in a gruesome and clear display of a narco-state murder. The photo of the murder, which took place in the drug war-torn state of Guerrero some seven weeks ago, quickly went viral on the Internet. On the same day, five other people were killed and some 43 more students went “missing” in the small town of Ayotzinapa. In a press conference addressing the abuses more than one month after the disappearance of the students, who hailed from a rural-based and selective teachers college in Guerrero, an Attorney General presumed them “dead” without presenting any evidence to substantiate his conclusion. The nation’s leading prosecutor said he was “tired” by the end of the press conference, much to the chagrin of those who sympathized with the plight of the parents of the disappeared students.

Those happenings have served as the sparks that have ignited the nation’s ire to a feverish boiling point in one of the largest countries and economies of Latin America. Mexico has witnessed near daily and nation-wide actions of resistance. Since the disappearance of the “normalistas” (students training to be teachers) on September 26, the country has been brimming with mass marches, candle-light vigils, university-campus and labor-union-led strikes, occupations of official and university buildings, riot police-led arrests of demonstrators, property destruction of official buildings, sit-ins, panels ruminating over the ills of narco-state violence and international bridge closings.

While the 43 students, who are technically still missing due to the lack of any corpses being forensically tied to the students, were what clearly catalyzed the movement’s inception, much of the country has long been weary of the systematic problem of disappearances and the eery official impunity which has often surrounded them. Nothing less than some 24,000 disappearances, over the course of the last three years alone, account for official estimates. Other analysts estimate the actual total as being far higher than that.

The Mayor of Iguala and his wife, dubbed as the “imperial couple,” were arrested several weeks ago, as teleSUR previously reported. At the time of their arrest, speculation was that their detention may produce valuable clues that could help solve the case of the disappeared students. However, no significant advances have been made in the case since the detention of the couple. At the time of their arrest, the on-the-run couple were fugitives from the law and in hiding when authorities busted them at a rented home in Itzapalapa, Mexico City.

More, HERE.

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Angry Protests Sweep Mexico after Government Says Missing Students are Dead


Global Research, November 11, 2014
Angry protests swept Mexico over the weekend in the wake of a press conference Friday in which Jesús Murillo Karam, the country’s attorney general, declared that 43 missing teaching students from the Ayotzinapa Normal School in the state of Guerrero are all dead. Murrillo based this evaluation on confessions by gang members that   they had killed the students, who were handed over to them by the police, and then burned their bodies.
Demonstrations in both Mexico City and the Guerrero capital of Chilpancingo saw clashes with police and attacks on government buildings. In the capital, a small group of demonstrators launched an attack on the historic National Palace in the city’s main square (El Zócalo). They first used metal security barriers to ram the building’s wooden door and then doused it with gasoline and set it on fire.
Some demonstrators questioned why it took police so long to respond to these acts, suggesting that they could have been the work of provocateurs.

More, HERE.

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More than 100,000 March in Mexico City over Disappeared Students

By Rafael Azul; Global Research, November 07, 2014

A mass protest march of more than 100,000 students, teachers, education workers and ordinary citizens took place in Mexico City on Wednesday, November 5, in solidarity with the 43 missing teaching students, normalistas, of the Ayotzinapa Normal School, who have been missing for over 40 days.

This was the third mass demonstration and by far the largest and angriest. Many of the participants directed their anger at President Enrique Peña Nieto, demanding that he resign. One protest sign denounced him “for corruption, betraying the nation, ineptitude,” calling him a “repressor and assassin.”
Others carried signs that said, “It was the State.” Leading the march were students from Mexico City’s National Autonomous Metropolitan University (UNAM), the Polytechnic Institute, rural teaching colleges, and Iberian-American University, who all had joined a massive nationwide 72-hour student strike.

At Mexico City’s Constitution Square (the Zócalo), many thousands greeted the protesters as they arrived after the two-and-a-half-hour march from the president’s mansion (Los Pinos). At the mass rally, family members of the 43 disappeared students spoke to the demonstrators. None of the major political parties (the governing PRI, the PAN, the PRD, the Greens) were involved in the protest.

More, HERE.
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Mexico Disarms Local Police in Missing Students’ City

By Press TV,Global Research, October 07, 2014
Mexican federal forces have disarmed the entire police department in the southern city of Iguala after its officers were accused of collaborating with a gang behind the recent disappearance of 43 students.
On Monday, the government’s new federal police unit took over security in Iguala, located some 200 kilometers (125 miles) south of the capital, Mexico City.

The federal unit was tasked with holding order in the city and helping search for the students who went missing last month after a deadly police shooting.

The deployment in the southern violence-stricken state of Guerrero came after President Enrique Pena Nieto vowed to establish justice and bring an end to corruption in the country.

Pena Nieto said he had dispatched the federal forces to Iguala to “find out what happened and apply the full extent of the law to those responsible.”The decision to disarm Iguala’s police corps came just days after 28 charred bodies were found in a mass grave on the outskirts of the city.

State prosecutor Inaky Blanco has said the recovered bodies probably belonged to the missing students. State officials also say it will take up to two weeks to receive the results of DNA tests to identify the corpses.

The students, all trainee teachers, went missing following a police attack on September 26 against a protest over   teachers’ rights.

According to Blanco, state investigators have obtained video footage showing local police arresting a number of   students during the clashes and taking them away.

Prosecutors said the Guerreros Unidos drug gang also participated in the police shooting that left six people dead and 25 others wounded.

Mexican authorities have already arrested 22 officers and issued arrest warrants for Iguala mayor Jose Luis Albarca and his security chief over the deadly incident.

More, HERE.
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Militarization and Political Crisis in Mexico

Is Mexico a Narco-State?

By Michael Werbowski;Global Research, May 31, 2010

Mexico - In the wake of Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s recent state visit to the U.S and Canada, a burning question remains without any clear answer.

2010 is historically significant for Mexico. It is its bi-centennial year of independence ( in 1810 the country began to break free from Spanish imperial tutelage) and perhaps more significantly is is also the centenary year of the 1910 Mexican revolution. There is little to celebrate though. The country this year, is still reeling from the vortex of drug-trafficking crimes, the global economic down-turn and the fall-out from the histrionics and panic induced by the H1N1-Swine flu “pandemic” of 2009.

Mexico after a decade of the centre-right almost “corporatist” PAN ( National Action Party) party’s rule, ( as in 2000, the first PAN candidate won the presidency, Vincente Fox) has been practically “Balkanised”. And as a result, it is now faced with a crippling fragmentation of the federation itself, due mainly to territorial battles or “turf wars” going on between rival drug cartels, which operate almost with impunity in many Mexican states. Possibly, the most fascinating and insightful read on this phenomenal topic is: Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State? . While I was pondering over the question raised by the book’s title , I was somewhat astonished to read in (despite what I witnessed first hand in Mexico) the concluding chapter, a rather reassuring reply. That basically, Mexico is far from becoming another Somalia, Pakistan or Haiti.

More, HERE.
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Destabilizing Mexico

By Rev. Richard Skaff; Global Research, March 13, 2009

Attorney General Eric Holder stated on February 25, 2009 that Mexican drug cartels pose a national security threat, and issued a direct warning to these cartels that they will be destroyed.

The warning came as the attorney general and acting Drug Enforcement Administration chief Michele Leonhart announced the completion of the final phase of DEA’s “Operation Xcellerator,” which targeted the Sinaloa cartel, a major western Mexico drug operation that has been expanding its reach into the United States . [1].

Meanwhile, the blood shed in the Mexican cities continues to be extensive and has expanded its tentacles of violence to various cities in Mexico. Lawlessness, corruption, murders, decapitations, and kidnappings have taken the Mexican cities by a storm, giving rise to a new radical group calling itself the Juarez Citizens Command that is threatening to strike back against lawlessness that has gripped Mexico for a long time. The group stated that they are going to strike back by killing one criminal a day until order and peace is restored. Similar groups are popping up all across Mexico. [2].

In its last report, the US Department of justice disclosed that 17.2 billion dollars in cash entered Mexico in only the past two years as a result of money laundering operation in their country. The report advised that Mexico and Colombia are the principal destinations of narco resources that operate in the US and that “the laundering of drug money is a global industry” with transnational organizations present in various countries. [2].

According to a DEA undercover operative, the Mexican drug cartels have gained more and more of the American market. They have grown bolder in their attempts to expand their operations in Mexico and the United States . They now control the ruling party in Mexico and operate the biggest drug business on earth right here in the USA . [2].

Mexico’s drug and violence problem now engulfs the entire country, inundating cities along the U.S.-Mexico border. The robust drug cartel reduced its position in the western mountains, and lunged into the heart of national power in Mexico City. The capital that was once relatively immune to such contemptuous boldness of drug killings has become the scene of multiple assassinations of high-ranking federal police officials in about a week. More than 1,000 people have been killed in Mexico this year in drug-related violence and about 6,290 in 2008. [11].

More, HERE.
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MORE MEXICO ARTICLES, BY GLOBAL RESEARCH, HERE

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I N T E R N A T I O N A L

“Je Suis CIA” By Larry Chin, January 17, 2015
cia
Since 9/11, the imperial playbook has consisted of time-tested tactic: the false flag operation. Carry out or facilitate a spectacular atrocity. Blame it on the enemy of choice. Issue a lie-infested official narrative, and have the corporate media repeat the lie. Rile up militant crowds, stoke the hatred, wage war with the public stamp of approval.

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Ali awakes armless
Massive terrorist attacks were hatched back soon after the pretext of cinematographic ‘terrorist’ attacks in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001. The people of Afghanistan were first in line, that winter bombing and invasion had been planned for some months before smoke billowed up from the Twin Towers.

Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies, Spring 2014

MEXICO: Center for Latin American Studies, University of California, Berkeley

Communities Up in Arms

Lorena Ojeda

 

The emergence of armed self-defense groups in the state of Michoacán has catapulted the region to the top of the Mexican federal government’s list of security concerns. Not all of these groups are alike, however. While the indigenous P’urhépecha community guards and the mestizo self-defense groups share many common grievances, they have arisen in response to different histories and different contemporary circumstances.

Concentrated in central and northwestern Michoacán, the P’urhépecha home area is divided into four sub-regions: the Sierra P’urhépecha; the Lake Pátzcuaro basin; the Ciénega de Zacapu; and the Cañada de los Once Pueblos. Disputes about land ownership and access to natural resources have long made the region a hot spot for both intra- and inter-community violence. Although agrarian conflicts in the region date back to the colonial era, they were exacerbated by the agrarian reform initiatives following the Mexican Revolution, in large part because the distribution of lands to one community almost always impacted the interests of its neighbors. The reforms resulted in bloody clashes that sowed distrust between the communities. To further complicate matters, this infighting made it easier for outside interest groups to gain a foothold in the area. Revolutionary and post-revolutionary bandits devastated indigenous villages, taking advantage of their divisions.  It was from this complex stew of conflicts that the community guards emerged.

More, HERE.

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The Berkeley Blog

Not everyone mourns for Ayotzinapa’s students

Forty-three student teachers (normalistas) disappeared on the evening of September 26 in the municipality of Iguala, in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero. The incident has attracted national and international attention, and it has also generated a wealth of speculation and misinformation. The daily reports concerning the discovery of numerous mass graves have further muddied the waters; the only silver lining, such as it is, in these reports is that the missingnormalistas do not appear to have been buried in any of the discovered grave sites. The contrast between the hope that the normalistas might still be alive, and the despair of living in a country where mass graves can seemingly be uncovered by simply kicking over a few stones, is striking.

But perhaps the most depressing aspect of this story is the indifference of some Mexicans that have even attempted to argue that the normalistas somehow deserved their fate because of their “rebellious attitudes” or their “delinquent” appearance. Thus, a society already divided by social class, skin color, linguistic differences, clothing styles, the size of one’s bank account, zip codes, and a host of other frivolous matters has found new ways of demarcating distinct types of Mexicans: “good” versus “bad”; those that receive justice versus those that do not; and those that can versus those that do not even deserve to try.

Meanwhile, Mexico’s political parties are only interested in representing and advancing their own interests. The left has lost its identity in its efforts to reach power. The right, which is more concerned with maintaining the appearance of good behavior, has shrouded itself in silence and indifference. And the ruling party’s principal preoccupation is the next election cycle and the perpetuation of its political dynasty, not the needs of Mexico’s citizens.

The Ayotzinapa case reveals the deterioration of Mexico’s political and social spheres. The missing normalistas are poor, indigenous or mestizo (mixed-race), and brown-skinned. Their hair is straight, they are not particularly tall, and they speak with the accents of the countryside. Simply put, they are Mexicans. But their surnames – Tizapa, Jacinto, Patolzin, Ascencio, Tlatempa, and Lauro, among others – are not among Mexico’s famous, and they are more likely to be found in the country’s seemingly infinite number of mass graves, as opposed to a social club or the halls of the stock market. The divide between Mexicans has become so great that some are not even moved by the heartrending pain experienced by the parents whose sons are missing.

The Ayotzinapa case has quickly become symbolic of the daily disappearances and murders that occur in Mexico, and of the mass graves that vastly outnumber the number of roads, hospitals, universities, and science and technology centers that have been built in recent years.

Throughout the world, many are pressuring the Mexican government to resolve the matter and bring those responsible to justice. Hundreds of thousands of Mexicans have taken to the streets demanding that the normalistas be found, while also calling out the shamelessness of the governments, political parties, and dominant social classes that allowed the disappearances to occur. But there are millions of Mexicans, and the majority of them appear to have been stunned into silence by the Mexican apocalypse, or have chosen to express their outrage safely behind closed doors.

COMMENTS

NOTE: Professor Lorena Ojeda authorized Security Corner in Mexico to republish this article. She is a visiting scholar in the Department of History at UC Berkeley and a professor of history at Mexico's Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo. Her work at Berkeley is supported by the Fulbright García-Robles and CONACYT grants. Ojeda recently published the article "Communities Up in Arms," on the emergence of armed self-defense groups in the state of Michoacán, in the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies.
ed.

NPR

By Eyder Peralta; February 03, 2015

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto is asking a government watchdog agency to look into the purchase of homes by himself, his wife, and his finance minister from contractors who were then awarded lucrative construction projects by the government.
Critics have charged that the Peña Nieto government faced conflicts of interest because of the transactions. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports Peña Nieto also announced anti-corruption initiatives.
She filed this report for our Newscast unit:
"Peña Nieto announced the investigation and new transparency measures for federal officials, including asset reporting requirements. Taking no questions from reporters, Peña Nieto said he had done nothing wrong.
"'I am conscious that the events generated the appearance of something improper...something that in reality did not occur," the president said.
"Press reports revealed the first lady bought a luxury home from a well connected contractor who was part of a group that won a multi-billion dollar transportation contract. The president and finance minister also purchased homes from government contractors."
As we've reported, back in 2012, Peña Nieto's wife, the telenovela star Angélica Rivera, bought a home valued at $7 million from a contractor who was then included in a $3.7 billion contract to build a high speed train.
Under political pressure, Rivera sold the house and said she had done nothing wrong.
More, HERE.
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December 26, 2014, Scott Neuman NPR's Carrie Kahn reports that the body of a kidnapped Catholic priest has been discovered after he was seized in the southern state of Guerrero earlier this week.
The body of Rev. Gregorio Lopez Gorostieta was found with a gunshot wound to the head, not far from the seminary where he lived near Ciudad Altamirano. Carrie says he is the third priest this year to be killed in Guerrero, where 43 students were kidnapped by corrupt police and presumably murdered by drug traffickers. Gorostieta is the first, however, to have been seized since the students disappeared in September.
More, HERE.
More MEXICO stories by NPR, HERE.

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November 19, 2014

Eyder Peralta

Amid rumblings about conflict of interest and corruption, Mexico's first lady says she will sell a multimillion-dollar home in one of the most glamorous areas of Mexico City.

In a YouTube video released late Tuesday, Angélica Rivera defiantly proclaims that she has "nothing to hide."
"I have worked all my life, and because of that I am an independent woman capable of building a patrimony with honesty," she said.
Rivera and her husband, President Enrique Peña Nieto, have been under heavy scrutiny lately: first, because of the way the government has handled the case of 43 students who went missing after they were detained by police, and then after Aristegui Noticias revealed that an opulent modern structure dubbed "The White House" and valued at $7 million was owned by a construction company awarded millions in government contracts.
As Aristegui explained, the house, which Rivera showed off in a glitzy spread in the royal-centric magazine ¡Hola!, was just another symbol of the "close relationship between Peña Nieto and Grupo Higa."
According to the investigation, Grupo Higa is owned by Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantú, who in the past rented out airplanes for the Peña Nieto's 2012 presidential campaign. The company, Aristegui reports, received millions  of dollars in contracts in the state of Mexico when Peña Nieto was governor.
Once Peña Nieto was in the presidential palace, a subsidiary of Hinojosa's company was awarded part of a huge contract to build a high-speed train from Mexico City to Querétaro.
Just days before the report was published, Peña Nieto canceled the $3.7 billion contract.
More, HERE.

© 2014 NPR

Business Monitor International

Industry Forecast - Mexico Offers Strongest Banking Sector Growth Potential - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Latin America / Economy

Slowing economic activity will temper asset and loan growth in several Latin American economies throughout our five-year forecast period. In contrast, we see stronger banking sector growth prospect...

Read article
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Risk Summary - Mexico - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Mexico / Economy

Mexico's Short-Term Political Risk Rating (STPRR) remains unchanged from last month at 63.5, ranking 8th out of 17 Latin American countries scored, and 12.3 points below regional leader Chile. Mexi...

Read article
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Political Risk Analysis - Ruling PRI To Lose Support In Midterms Due To Iguala Crisis - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Mexico / Economy

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto's approval rating will continue to fall in the coming months, as the disappearance of 43 students in Iguala heightens concerns over security and corruption. This will have negative implications for the ruling Partido Institucional Revolucionario in the June 2015 mid-term elections, increasing the odds of a strong result by the main centre-right opposi...

READ FULL ARTICLE
© 2015 Business Monitor International

Al Jazeera America

Crude harvest: Selling Mexico's oil

VIDEO: Mexico may be hitting the perfect storm when it opens its energy resources to foreign investors.

30 Dec 2014
Against the backdrop of Mexico's ever-widening gap between rich and poor, growing violence, and stalled economy, President Enrique Pena Nieto has passed a series of economic reforms.
Under these reforms, Mexico's oil, which was expropriated from foreign interests 75 years ago, is now for sale to private, international companies.
Twenty years ago, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which opened Mexico up to trade with the US and Canada, led to the collapse of agriculture, and paved the way to the privatization of oil.
The operations of Mexico's state-owned oil company, Pemex, have never been entirely transparent, and communities have been crippled by oil disasters. For instance, in October 2013, the state of Tabasco experienced its worst oil disaster when a drill site exploded and burned for 55 days, contaminating the surrounding land and water. Villagers closest to the site say they are suffering from health problems and have lost their livestock. They say Pemex has never accepted responsibility for the accident, nor has it offered any compensation.
More, HERE.
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OPINION: Privatising Mexico's oil industry spells disaster

In the absence of strong state institutions, the privatisation of Mexico's oil industry will be disastrous.

30 Dec 2014, By

Edgardo Buscaglia is a Senior Law and Economics Scholar at Columbia University in New York and President of the Instituto de Accion Ciudadana in Mexico.

Who can deny that Mexico is one of the most admired cradles of civilisation, with its culture and history considered an integral part of the world's historical heritage. Yet, Mexico is also a country whose population for centuries has been raped by corrupt authoritarian governments; it is a country which has suffered domestic and regional conflicts leading to foreign interventions backing extractive business interests.
The 1910 Mexican Revolution brought together various groups calling for social justice. It was a natural reaction to centuries of foreign looting of Mexico's resources. One of the consequences of the Revolution was the decision by the
Mexican government to nationalise the immense reserves of oil in the 1930s.
However, it seems that Mexican politicians today have failed to learn a lesson from history. The administration of Mexican President Pena Nieto recently approved legal reforms which will make it possible once again for private firms to become the major players in the Mexican oil business.
More, HERE.

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Who's making money off the War on Drugs?

Disappearance of 43 students from Mexico spurred a national debate about the winners and losers in war on drugs.

Since the disappearance of 43 students from #Ayotzinapa school in Guerrero, Mexico, people around the world have taken to the streets to demand an end to drug-related crime and the close ties between drug cartels, police and political institutions. So if everybody's losing, who's winning?

The rebel spirit driving Mexico’s protests has deep roots

Analysis: Outrage over case of 43 missing students has helped unleash widespread discontent with a deep historical echo

Protests over missing students spread in Mexico

A chronology of the disappearance of 43 students from a teachers’ college in Mexico and its aftermath

Mexico’s church calls for government to change response to violence

Cardinal Norberto Rivera Carrera calls changes ‘necessary,’ says pope is monitoring case of 43 missing students

Cuba-US thaw is a win for Latin America

Analysis: Return of US-Cuban diplomatic relations will affect entire region and possibly isolate Venezuela

Latin America celebrates new US-Cuba era

Chile’s minister of foreign relations calls the Obama and Castro speeches the beginning of the end of the Cold War

VIDEO: Mexico's Nieto faces growing calls to resign

02 Dec 2014

President's second anniversary in office marred by protests as he and the government are accused of corruption.

With help from the Obama administration, Peña Nieto is brutally reshaping Mexican society

Through the story of one immigrant family, we explore the evolution of racism and migration in the US.

President Pena Nieto proposes changes to police force following uproar over presumed massacre of 43 students.
Ferguson: Lawmakers urge calm, offer few policy prescriptions

Analysis: Think riots have never caused change in America? Think again

Brown's parents vow to 'keep fighting' for justice

Protesters upset by Ferguson decision storm St. Louis City Hall

Confronting race and inequality in the US
Week before verdict, 12 killed by US law enforcement

Please click on HERE to get updated Al Jazeera, Mexico news

Drug trafficking organizations are rapidly splintering, but there€’s no end in sight to the violence

Topics:

Mexico

Drugs

Drug Cartels
The village warriors of Guerrero

Cocaine, heroin and avocados


Tens of thousands of people angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students are marching in Mexico City as part of another day of nationwide protests.

Protesters on Thursday waved blackened flags of Mexico and many chanted for the resignation of President Enrique Pena Nieto. "He will fall, he will fall, Pena Nieto will fall," they chanted.

Some protesters clashed with riot police near the city's international airport at the start of the day's demonstrations, burning tyres, throwing firebombs and launching firecrackers at police.
Thursday’s protest was the latest protest over the government's handling of a crime that has infuriated Mexicans fed up with corruption, impunity and a drug war that has left more than 100,000 people dead or missing since 2006.

The case has turned into the biggest challenge of Pena Nieto's nearly two-year-old presidency, on top of another scandal over a mansion his wife bought from a government contractor.
'Mexico is hurting'

The crisis erupted after the mayor of the city of Iguala allegedly ordered police to confront students on September 26, sparking a night of violence that left six people dead and 43 missing, authorities say.
Protesters angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students take to the streets for another day of demonstrations.

More, HERE.

Police officer fires on Mexico City students, inflaming tensions

Students had been planning for a Nov. 20 national strike in solidarity with 43 missing students from Guerrero

INSIDE STORY

VIDEO: Missing Mexico students: Who is responsible.

Protesters demand justice for missing 43 trainee teachers who are feared murdered in Mexico. To watch video click on HERE.
Mexico president pushes trade ties in China while protests rage at home

Peña Nieto's Beijing trip amid massive political crisis at home shows heavy bet on China ties as economic boost

Mexico missing student protesters burn state buildings

Protest movement has hit Guerrero'€™s tourism industry with vacationers canceling trips during busiest time of year.

Photos: In Acapulco, an angry demonstration over missing students

Students, peasants and others attempt to block the airport and clash with police.

Mexico leader travels to Asia amid rising unrest over missing students

Peña Nieto faces increased calls to resign as another presidential scandal emerged over the weekend

Mexico protesters set fire to National Palace over missing students

Gang members have confessed to killing the 43 missing students and dumping their charred remains in a landfill.

Gang members confess to mass killing of Mexico students

Charred human remains found in a dumpster are likely the students who disappeared on Sept. 26, Mexican authorities say.

Mexican army accepts criticism of human rights commission in killings

The defense department says, however, it doesn't agree with all findings of human rights commission on the June slayings.

Why have the most recent kidnappings in Mexico sparked such outrage?

The disappearance of 43 students in Mexico has triggered nationwide demonstrations for government accountability.

Thousands protest missing Mexico students despite mayor arrest

Public anger over student disappearances brings Mexico City to a standstill; full-blown crisis for President Peña Nieto.

Photos: Protests over 43 Guerrero students target government buildings

A city congress and buildings tied to the ruling party are trashed and burned.

The food producer has developed more than 480 varieties of wheat, upping production by an estimated 200 million tonnes.
Mexican official: CIA 'manages' drug trade

Spokesman for Chihuahua state says US agencies don't want to end drug trade, a claim denied by other Mexican officials

24 Jul 2012, by Chris Arsenault

Juarez, Mexico - The US Central Intelligence Agency and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers", a spokesman for the Chihuahua state government in northern Mexico has told Al Jazeera, instead "they try to manage the drug trade".
Allegations about official complicity in the drug business are nothing new when they come from activists, professors, campaigners or even former officials. However, an official spokesman for the authorities in one of Mexico's most violent states - one which directly borders Texas - going on the record with such accusations is unique.

"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva, the Chihuahua spokesman, told Al Jazeera last month at his office in Juarez. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."

Accusations are 'baloney'

Villanueva is not a high ranking official and his views do not represent Mexico's foreign policy establishment. Other more senior officials in Chihuahua State, including the mayor of Juarez, dismissed the claims as "baloney".

"I think the CIA and DEA [US Drug Enforcement Agency] are on the same side as us in fighting drug gangs," Hector Murguia, the mayor of Juarez, told Al Jazeera during an interview inside his SUV. "We have excellent collaboration with the US."

Under the Merida Initiative, the US Congress has approved more than $1.4bn in drug war aid for Mexico, providing attack helicopters, weapons and training for police and judges.

More than 55,000 people have died in drug related violence in Mexico since December 2006. Privately, residents and officials across Mexico's political spectrum often blame the lethal cocktail of US drug consumption and the flow of high-powered weapons smuggled south of the border for causing much of the carnage.

"The war on drugs is an illusion," Hugo Almada Mireles, professor at the Autonomous University of Juarez and author of several books, told Al Jazeera. "It's a reason to intervene in Latin America."

"The CIA wants to control the population; they don't want to stop arms trafficking to Mexico, look at [Operation] Fast and Furious,” he said, referencing a botched US exercise where automatic weapons were sold to criminals in the hope that security forces could trace where the guns ended up.
The Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms lost track of 1,700 guns as part of the operation, including an AK-47 used in 2010 the murder of Brian Terry, a Customs and Border Protection Agent.

More, HERE.

© 2014 Al Jazeera America, LLC. All rights reserved.

InSight Crime

InSight Crime is a foundation dedicated to the study of the principal threat to national and citizen security in Latin America and the Caribbean: organized crime. We seek to deepen and inform the debate about organized crime in the Americas by providing the general public with regular reporting, analysis and investigation on the subject and on state efforts to combat it. More about Insight Crime HERE.
Iguala Massacre: Mexico's PR Message Goes Up in Flames

The stunning, dramatic blow-by-blow account of what most likely happened to the 43 missing students in Guerrero is an indication of just how desperately Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto and his team are trying to perform damage control on a terrifying story -- one that has not only unsettled his government, but has pushed them to admit that things are not as their public relations machine would have you believe.
In the hour-long November 7 press conference (see video below), Attorney General Jose Murillo Karam announced that the recent capture of alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos led to confessions that the students were taken by police while en route to the town of Iguala. The police handed the students over to the Guerreros Unidos, who then killed them and burned their remains.
Specifically, video testimonies from three recently captured “masterminds” of the attacks revealed that the students were carted like cattle to a landfill in Cocula. According to one suspect, approximately 15 students asphyxiated on the way to the dump site. The remaining students were interrogated by members of the Guerreros Unidos before being shot and killed. The bodies were then thrown into the landfill, arranged in a circle, covered in sticks, gasoline, and diesel, and burned. The fire reportedly lasted for 14 hours, from midnight on September 27, until mid-afternoon.
According to the testimonies, a leader of the criminal group known as “El Terco” ordered the burned human remains to be collected and placed into eight black plastic bags. Members of the Guerreros Unidos then took the bags to the San Juan River in Cocula, where they dumped the contents into the water, while two bags were thrown directly into the river.
Following the confessions, search teams found black bags, one of which was still closed. Mexican and Argentine forensic teams reportedly confirmed the bag contained human remains. However, due to the degree to  which the bodies were burned, forensic experts have not yet determined when the remains will be able to be identified.

More, HERE.

Home

Tech Execs Raising Eyebrows Over Washington State’s Cannabis-Tracking Pact

Concerns Center on Transparency, Open Competition and Federal Scrutiny

By Bill Conroy, Via The Narcosphere

February 16, 2015

Concerns Center on Transparency, Open Competition and Federal Scrutiny

The emerging cannabis industry in Washington is tied at the hip to the state’s burgeoning technology sector in no small measure because robust product-tracking data serves as a shield against federal pre-emption of the great marijuana-legalization experiment now underway.

That’s why a little-noticed flap within the state’s tech community is worth paying attention to as regulators in the state continue to roll out the infrastructure to support legal weed — approved by Washington voters in November 2012 through a referendum dubbed Initiative 502.

More, HERE.

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A Battle Has Erupted Over Washington’s Legal Cannabis Plazas

By Bill Conroy - December 18, 2014 at 8:08 pm
The Outcome Could Help Define A Path To A Peaceful End To the Drug War
A major turf war has erupted in the grand experiment to legalize marijuana in the state of Washington.
However, this battle is being waged with the tools of politics, the courts and organizing, unlike the drug war, where disputes over control of the drug plazas, or markets, normally are settled with bullets.
The stakes are high in this turf dispute in Washington, with hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue on the table and the future of a nascent cannabis industry hanging in the balance.

More, HERE.
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Torture Report Reveals CIA’s Manipulation of US Media

By Bill Conroy - December 12, 2014
Agency Used Classified Information As Currency For Deception
The recently released Senate Select Committee on Intelligence report pillorying the CIA’s Bush-era detention and interrogation program is replete with lurid details of what would commonly be called torture, if those practices were carried out on you or me.
Waterboarding, rectal feeding, sleep deprivation, coffin-size cells and forcing detainees to stand in stress positions, even with broken bones, is the stuff of a horror movie. But there is another revelation in the long-awaited, and controversial, Senate committee report that so far seems to have slipped past much examination in the public spotlight.

More, HERE.
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US Military’s Training of Mexican Security Forces Continues As Human-Rights Abuses Mount In Mexico

Posted by Bill Conroy - December 3, 2014

DoD Officials Claim Training is Part of the Solution, Not the Problem

The U.S. government has spent more than $62 million since fiscal year 2010 providing highly specialized training to Mexican security forces, including some $16.3 million in fiscal 2013, as part of an effort to help Mexico better prosecute its war on drugs, records made public under the U.S. Foreign Assistance Act show.

Local Opposition to Washington’s Legal Marijuana Businesses Is a Taxing Issue For the Fledgling Industry

Posted by Bill Conroy - November 14, 2014
Effort to Overcome City Moratoriums on Cannabis Shops Could Spark an Unlikely Alliance
The great experiment in the state of Washington to legalize the sale of marijuana through a regulated and taxed market has hit a hitch at the local level that threatens to slow progress to a snail’s pace, even as more and more marijuana businesses obtain the state licensing needed to open their doors.
Through early November, Washington’s cannabis market, state records show, included some 63 retailers, 239 producers and 197 processors — all issued the required state-level licenses to begin doing business in the state. But the battle ahead for many of them — and others in the pipeline — to actually open their doors for business is far from over.

More, HERE.
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Labor Unions Are Supporting Washington State Legal Marijuana Dispensaries that Create "More Workers to Organize"

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 22, 2014
The United Food and Commercial Workers and other Unions Seek to Strengthen Protections for Cannabis Workers
What’s going on in the state of Washington and beyond with the movement to legalize marijuana is, only in part, about business, taxes and government oversight — all to be amplified by the billions of dollars annually this new industry promises to throw off.

More, HERE.
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Community Police in Guerrero’s Costa Chica Region to Celebrate 19 Years of a Better Way to Combat Crime and Corruption

The Same Southern Mexican State Where 43 Students Were Disappeared Is also Home to a Grassroots Movement that Shows How People Can Police Themselves When the State Becomes Criminal.

By Greg Berger and Oscar Olivera

Special for The Narco News Bulletin

November 7, 2014

Publisher’s Note: In Mexico and throughout the world the state of Guerrero has become a vivid example of the horrors of the “war on drugs” and the pervasive corruption and violence it invites from all levels of government. On September 26, Mayor Jose Luis Abarca of the city of Iguala ordered police to detain a group of students from the local Ayotzinapa teachers’ college. The mayor’s ties to organized crime have been widely documented. It is believed that the mayor thought the students were planning to stage a protest at a public event held by his wife. Police then killed six students, and 43 more were disappeared. The police reportedly turned the 43 youths over to a local criminal gang. Multiple mass graves have been dug up in the area, each at first rumored to contain the bodies of the students, then have been revealed to be the tombs of previous nameless casualties of the US-imposed drug war.
The whereabouts of the missing students are still unknown.
More, HERE.
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Millions Missing From DEA Money-Laundering Operation

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 6, 2014

But No One With the Power to Investigate Seems to Care
At least $20 million went missing from money seizures by law enforcers, critical evidence was destroyed by a federal agency, a key informant was outed by a US prosecutor — contributing to her being kidnapped and nearly killed — and at the end of the day not a single narco-trafficker was prosecuted in this four-year-long DEA undercover operation gone awry.
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Charles Bowden has died, but his voice is louder than ever

Posted by Bill Conroy - September 2, 2014

As one of the original authentic journalists, he trailblazed a path for others to follow
When I heard that he had passed, my eyes welled with tears. I’m of stoic Irish stock, so I don’t shed tears easily, but the news of Charles Bowden’s death (1945-2014) was not an easy thing to bear. He had been a mentor and a friend to me for a decade, and his leaving hurts.
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Posted by Bill Conroy - May 7, 2014
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U.S. Military: More Counter-Narcotics Funding Will Help Stem Exodus of Children from Central America

By Bill Conroy - July 29, 2014

 

Critics Argue Drug-War Money is Part of the Problem, Not the Solution.

 

Some 58,000 migrant children, mostly Central Americans, have made the treacherous journey to the U.S. southern border alone over the past 10 months, but actions being considered by U.S. officials to combat the problem with more military and drug-war aid to their countries, critics warn, may worsen the violence that provokes this unprecedented exodus.

 

The number of unaccompanied children that have arrived at the U.S. border so far this fiscal year is up 106 percent from the same period a year earlier — with the total expected to reach 90,000 before Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year.


To put that latter number in perspective, it is nearly five times larger than the number of Border Patrol agents now stationed along the entire southern border.

More, HERE.
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MORE NARCO NEWS, HERE

25 Deadliest Mass Shootings in U.S. History Fast Facts

By CNN Library; September 2, 2014
(CNN) -- Here is a list of the 25 deadliest single day mass shootings in U.S. history from 1949 to the present. If the shooter was killed or committed suicide during the incident that death is not included in the total.

Timeline:

32 killed - April 16, 2007 - Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. A gunman, 23-year-old student Seung-Hui Cho, goes on a shooting spree killing 32 people in two locations and wounds an undetermined number of others on campus. The shooter, Seung-Hui Cho then committed suicide.

27 killed - December 14, 2012 - Sandy Hook Elementary School - Newtown, Connecticut. Adam Lanza, 20, guns down 20 children, ages 6 and 7, and six adults, school staff and faculty, before turning the gun on himself. Investigating police later find Nancy Lanza, Adam's mother, dead from a gunshot wound. The final count is 28 dead, including the shooter.

23 killed - October 16, 1991 - In Killeen, Texas, 35-year-old George Hennard crashes his pickup truck through the wall of a Lubys Cafeteria. After exiting the truck, Hennard shoots and kills 23 people. He then commits suicide.

21 killed - July 18, 1984 - In San Ysidro, California, 41-year-old James Huberty, armed with a long-barreled Uzi, a pump-action shotgun and a handgun shoots and kills 21 adults and children at a local McDonalds. A police sharpshooter kills Huberty one hour after the rampage begins.

18 killed - August 1, 1966 - In Austin, Texas, Charles Joseph Whitman, a former U.S. Marine, kills 16 and wounds at least 30 while shooting from a University of Texas tower. Police officers Ramiro Martinez and Houston McCoy shot and killed Whitman in the tower. Whitman had also killed his mother and wife earlier in the day.

14 killed - August 20, 1986 - Edmond, Oklahoma part-time mail carrier, Patrick Henry Sherrill, armed with three handguns kills 14 postal workers in ten minutes and then takes his own life with a bullet to the head.

13 killed - November 5, 2009 - Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan kills 13 people and injures 32 at Fort Hood, Texas, during a shooting rampage. He is convicted and sentenced to death.

13 killed - April 3, 2009 - In Binghamton, New York, Jiverly Wong kills 13 people and injures four during a shooting at an immigrant community center. He then kills himself.

13 killed - April 20, 1999 - Columbine High School - Littleton, Colorado. 18-year-old Eric Harris and

17-year-old Dylan Klebold kill 12 fellow students and one teacher before committing suicide in the school library.

13 killed - September 25, 1982 - In Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 40-year-old George Banks, a prison guard, kills 13 people including five of his own children. In September 2011, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturns his death sentence stating that Banks is mentally incompetent.

13 killed - September 5, 1949 - In Camden, New Jersey, 28-year-old Howard Unruh, a veteran of World War II, shoots and kills 13 people as he walks down Camden's 32nd Street. His weapon of choice is a German-crafted Luger pistol. He is found insane and is committed to a state mental institution. He dies at the age of 88.

12 killed - September 16, 2013 - Shots are fired inside the Washington Navy Yard killing 12. The shooter, identified as Aaron Alexis, 34, is also killed.

12 killed - July 20, 2012 - Twelve people are killed and 58 are wounded in a shooting at an Aurora, Colorado, movie theater screening of the new Batman film. James E. Holmes, 24, is taken into custody outside of the movie    theater. The gunman is dressed head-to-toe in protective tactical gear, set off two devices of some kind before spraying the theater with bullets from an AR-15 rifle, a 12-gauge shotgun and at least one of two .40-caliber handguns police recovered at the scene.

12 killed - July 29, 1999 - In Atlanta, 44-year-old Mark Barton kills his wife and two children at his home. He then opens fire in two different brokerage houses killing nine people and wounding 12. He later kills himself.

10 killed - March 10, 2009 - In Alabama, Michael McLendon of Kinston, kills 10 and himself. The dead include his mother, grandparents, aunt and uncle.

9 killed - March 21, 2005 - Red Lake High School, Red Lake, Minnesota. 16-year-old Jeff Weise kills his grandfather and another adult, five students, a teacher and a security officer. He then kills himself.

9 killed - June 18, 1990 - In Jacksonville, Florida, 42-year-old James Pough, angry about his car being repossessed, opens fire at at a General Motors Acceptance Corp. office, killing nine people. Pough takes his own life.

8 killed - October 12, 2011 - Eight people are killed during a shooting at the Salon Meritage in Seal Beach, California. The suspect, Scott Evans Dekraai, 41, of Huntington Beach, is arrested without incident as he is trying to leave the scene. The eight dead include Dekraai's ex-wife, Michelle Fournier, 48. He was armed with three guns -- a 9 mm Springfield, a Smith & Wesson .44 Magnum, and a Heckler & Koch .45 -- and was wearing body armor during the shooting rampage.

8 killed - August 3, 2010 - Manchester, Connecticut - Omar Thornton kills eight co-workers at Hartford Distributors before turning the gun on himself. Thornton had been asked to resign for stealing and selling alcoholic beverages.

8 killed - January 19, 2010 - Christopher Speight, 39, kills eight people at a house in Appomattox, Virginia. He surrenders to police at the scene the next morning, and is charged with one count of murder with additional charges pending.

8 killed - March 29, 2009 - In Carthage, North Carolina, 45-year-old Robert Stewart kills a nurse and seven elderly patients at a nursing home. In May, the Moore County district attorney announces she will seek the death penalty. On September 3, 2011, a jury finds Stewart guilty of second-degree murder. Stewart is sentenced to 141 to 179 years in prison.

8 killed - December 5, 2007 - In Omaha, Nebraska, 19-year-old Robert Hawkins goes to an area mall and kills eight shoppers before killing himself.

8 killed - July 1, 1993 - In San Francisco, 55-year-old Gian Luigi Ferri kills eight people in a law office and then kills himself.

8 killed - September 14, 1989 - In Louisville, Kentucky, 47-year-old Joseph Wesbecker armed with a AK-47 semiautomatic assault rifle, two MAC-11 semiautomatic pistols, a .38 caliber handgun, a 9-millimeter semiautomatic pistol and a bayonet kills eight co-workers at Standard Gravure Corporation and then kills himself. He had been placed on disability leave from his job due to mental problems.

8 killed - August 20, 1982 - In Miami, 51-year-old history teacher Carl Robert Brown, angry about a repair bill and armed with a shotgun, kills eight people at a machine shop. He flees by bicycle, but is shot in the back by a witness who pursued him. He was on leave from school for psychological treatment.

List of rampage killers (school massacres), by Wikipedia

List of school shootings in the United States, by Wikipedia

Starting with Pontiac's Rebellion school massacre on July 26, 1764 to August 6, 2014in River Woods Elementary when an 11-year-old student at RWES in Des Moines, Iowa, brought a BB gun to the school accompanied by two former students aged 11 & 16. The student admitted to having the weapon and making threats against 4 students. Police recovered the gun and arrested the alleged students
More, HERE.

America's Wars: U.S. Casualties and Veterans

The table below has information about the total number of service members, battle deaths, and nonmortal woundings in wars from 1775 to 2012; such as the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War I and II, Vietnam, and more
Information Please® Database, © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

67% of all homicides in the U.S. were conducted using a firearm: UN

According to the FBI, in 2012, there were 8,855 total firearm-related homicides in the US, with 6,371 of those attributed to handguns. 61% of all gun-related deaths in the U.S. are suicides. More, HERE by Wikipedia.

Crime in the United States

Crime in the United States has been present since colonization
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

© 2014 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Journalism in Mexico

Radio silenced. A crusading anchorwoman is pushed off the air

Mar 21st 2015 | MEXICO CITY

NEWS junkies in Mexico have woken up feeling bereft and baffled since March 16th. The feisty, staccato voice of Carmen Aristegui, a radio anchorwoman with almost cult status, especially among left-leaning listeners, has gone off the airwaves after a public row with her employer, MVS Radio. The radio group fired her despite acknowledging that she was one of Mexico’s most popular morning-show hosts, drew in advertisers and delivered scoops that scandalised the country. Even MVS Radio sounds remorseful. “It’s a situation in which everyone loses,” a spokesman admits.

Behind this falling out are problems that systematically undermine journalism in Mexico, where the media have long been dominated by political power. Many outlets, including MVS Radio, rely on the government for advertising and other perks. The biggest television networks, Televisa and TV Azteca, are a pliant duopoly.

More, HERE.

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Conflict of interest in Mexico

A false start

Mixed messages in a new anti-corruption campaign

The Mexican morass

A president who doesn’t get that he doesn’t get it

IN A new year message Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, promised to work to “liberate” his country from crime, corruption and impunity. His cabinet has duly set these as its priorities. The message is the right one. But unfortunately for Mr Peña, Mexicans are increasingly cynical about the messenger.
Mexico is still seething over the government’s leaden response to the kidnap in September of 43 students by municipal police in the south-western state of Guerrero and their apparent murder by drug traffickers. The investigation of the case seems to have stalled. Mr Peña’s main policy response to the massacre is a proposed constitutional amendment to abolish municipal police forces. But Congress may not approve it, not least because some are less rotten than the state forces, which would take their place.
More, HERE.

Scandal in Mexico: A murky mortgage

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa Was a Crime of the State - See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Questions surround the purchase of a house owned by the finance minister 

Dec 12th 2014

Mexico’s growing crisis: Reforms and democracy, but no rule of law

Nov 13th 2014

To save a promising presidency, Enrique Peña Nieto must tackle crime and corruption

From the print edition
DURING two years in office Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has received sharply contrasting reviews at home and abroad. Foreigners, including The Economist, have praised his structural reforms of the economy, which include an historic measure to open up energy to private investment (see article). Yet polls show that most Mexicans dislike Mr Peña. Among other things, they blame his government for a squeeze on living standards and the interlinked problems of violent crime and corruption. Sadly, recent events have lent support to Mr Peña’s domestic critics.
On November 8th Mexico’s attorney-general announced what almost everyone had already concluded: that 43 students from a teacher-training college in the southern state of Guerrero, who disappeared in the town of Iguala in late September, had been murdered by drug-traffickers after being kidnapped by the local police on the orders of the town’s mayor. Guerrero has been Mexico’s most violent state for centuries. The federal government bears no direct responsibility for these events. But Mexicans see in them a symbol of the failure of Mr Peña’s administration to make security a priority.
Now comes a problem that is uncomfortably close to home. The government had already opted to cancel a contract for a high-speed train that it had hastily awarded to the sole bidder, a consortium of Chinese and Mexican companies including a construction firm from the president’s home state. A local journalist has revealed that the boss of the same firm owns a $7m mansion that is the Peña family’s private residence (see article). The president denies any wrongdoing, but a common thread runs through these events.
Mexico only became a democracy in 2000, when seven decades of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the political machine that raised Mr Peña, were ended by electoral defeat. Unfortunately, democracy did not bring the rule of law to Mexico. Too many in the PRI still see the job of the police and the courts as enforcing political control, rather than investigating mobsters. Corrupt politicians are protected rather than punished. Organised crime and graft both remain a part of everyday life, and neither has been helped by the drugs flowing north to the United States.
More, HERE.
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Victims of Mexico’s drug war

Tracing the missing

Many thousands disappeared in Mexico’s drug war. The government should do more to find them

Mexico’s economy

Jam mañana

A frustrating start to the year

 

May 24th 2014 | MEXICO CITY | From the print edition

SO FAR this year Mexico’s government has resembled one of the country’s many devotees of St Jude, patron saint of lost causes. It has doggedly stuck to a 3.9% 2014 growth forecast, even though its main export market, the United States, has been sluggish, and the twin pillars of its domestic economy—buying and building—have fared even worse.

On May 21st the central bank revised its growth prediction down to 2.3-3.3%, from 3-4% previously. The government was expected finally to follow suit on May 23rd, when first-quarter GDP figures were due to be released. Even so, officials are convinced that within months the benefits of its plans to modernise the economy will start to show up in the numbers.

Mexicans have good reason to be sceptical.

More, HERE.

 

Copyright © The Economist Newspaper Limited 2013. All rights reserved.

The Guardian

Whistleblowers wanted: Mexican journalists seek tips through website

Top radio presenter Carmen Aristegui was fired on Sunday for participating in Mexicoleaks alliance to gain anonymous information to expose state corruption

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Mexico offered James Bond film studios millions to shoot its good side

Officials offered Sony Pictures and MGM up to $20m in tax incentives to make changes to upcoming Bond film that cast country in positive light

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Mexican mayoral candidate reportedly decapitated – body found on dirt road

The abduction and assassination of Aidé Nava continues to highlight the link between politics and drug war violence in the state of Guerrero

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UN: torture in Mexico occurs with 'impunity' at hands of security forces

Report based on a fact-finding visit to Mexico last spring outlines methods used during detentions to combat crime that include waterboarding and rape

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From California gang to Mexican vigilante: the family man fighting the drug cartels in Mexico – video

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Tourist dies and two injured after whale crashes into sightseeing boat off Mexico

Grey whale hit a tourist boat at Cabo San Lucas on the Mexican coast, say authorities, with a Canadian woman dying of her injuries

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Britain’s welcome for Mexican president is worrying

With revelations continuing to emerge about Enrique Peña Nieto’s links to big business, the decision to allow him a state visit to the UK is misjudged

Britain will roll out the red carpet for the Mexican president, Enrique Peña Nieto, when he arrives for his state visit in March. The government sees Mexico as a “springboard into the Latin American market”.

However, today’s Observer interview with 19-year-old Uriel Alonso Solís should serve as an antidote to the hype that will surround the visit. Alonso survived the attack by police in Guerrero state on students who were then kidnapped and handed over to a drug cartel for execution. One of Mexico’s leading reporters on narcotics, Anabel Hernández, published evidence in Proceso magazine that federal authorities had been involved.

More, HERE

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Snowden voted person of the year


Edward Snowden
In May Edward Snowden flew to Hong Kong where he gave journalists the material which blew the lid on the extent of US digital spying. Photograph: The Guardian/AFP/Getty Images

 

For the second year in a row, a young American whistleblower alarmed at the unfettered and at times cynical deployment of power by the world's foremost superpower has been voted the Guardian's person of the year.

Edward Snowden, who leaked an estimated 200,000 files that exposed the extensive and intrusive nature of phone and internet surveillance and intelligence gathering by the US and its western allies, was the overwhelming choice of more than 2,000 people who voted.

The NSA whistleblower garnered 1,445 votes. In a distant second, from a list of 10 candidates chosen by Guardian writers and editors, came Marco Weber and Sini Saarela, the Greenpeace activists who spearheaded the oil rig protest over Russian Arctic drilling. They received 314 votes. Pope Francis gained 153 votes, narrowly ahead of blogger and anti-poverty campaigner Jack Monroe, who received 144.
Snowden's victory was as decisive as Chelsea Manning's a year earlier.

More, HERE.

© 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.

latimes.com

Click on HERE to get the latest Los Angeles Times News

Man charged with kidnapping, sexually assaulting 2-year-old girl

American woman, boyfriend sentenced for murdering her mother at Bali resort

Boston Marathon bomber's lawyers try to explain his crude gesture

Prosecutors to begin fight for death penalty in Boston Marathon bombing

Police search for suspect, truck after fatal Hollywood stabbing

2 LAPD officers injured during altercation with suspect

LAPD officer faces rare assault charge in 'horrific' videotaped beating

Michael R. Mitchell, lawyer who fought LAPD chokehold use, dies at 73

L.A. council candidate faced attempted rape charge that was dismissed

Autopsy shows Baltimore man in police custody died from spinal injury

2 men arrested in San Diego on terrorism charges ordered held without bail

Police are no closer to finding sea lion pup stolen from L.A. beach

Pasadena Sears security guard stabbed by suspected thief

LAPD calls in the reinforcements. What could possibly go wrong?

Nearly half of Americans threatened by earthquakes, study finds

Crime rise puts LAPD in a difficult position

Who really listens to L.A. mayor's State of the City speech?

Two teens stabbed, wounded during brawl outside Santa Ana high school

Why most of the $100 million L.A. spends on homelessness goes to police

Public needs cold, hard numbers on use of deadly force

The Pentagon’s $10-billion bet gone bad

Trying to fashion a shield against a sneak missile attack, military planners gambled on costly projects that flopped, leaving a hole in U.S. homeland defense.

Leaders of the U.S. Missile Defense Agency were effusive about the new technology.

It was the most powerful radar of its kind in the world, they told Congress. So powerful it could detect a baseball over San Francisco from the other side of the country.

ADVERTISEMENT

If North Korea launched a sneak attack, the Sea-Based X-Band Radar — SBX for short — would spot the incoming missiles, track them through space and guide U.S. rocket-interceptors to destroy them.

Crucially, the system would be able to distinguish between actual missiles and decoys.

SBX “represents a capability that is unmatched,” the director of the Missile Defense Agency told a Senate subcommittee in 2007.

In reality, the giant floating radar has been a $2.2-billion flop, a Los Angeles Times investigation found.

More, HERE.

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Boy, 8, shot in head by intruder while sleeping in bed; suspect sought

Ex-49er Kwame Harris allegedly tried to bite S.F. police officer

Woman's mummified body found in San Francisco home

MWD plans to ration water to Southland districts, cities

Southern California's water wholesaler plans to ration the water it sends amid dwindling regional reserves and a fourth year of drought.

Gov. Brown orders state's first mandatory water restrictions

Chowchilla school bus kidnapper gets initial OK for parole

Literacy gap between Latino and white children starts early

Latest LAFD recruits: mostly white, mostly male

The 54 recruits include only two women. Racial minorities are better represented than in past years, but the new hiring and screening effort has fallen short of the diversity needed to reflect L.A.

LAPD investigating homicide in Valley Glen

Los Angeles police Wednesday were investigating a fatal shooting in the southeast San Fernando Valley.


Gay porn star accused of blackmail, threatened wealthy man

2 killed, child wounded in Hawthorne shooting involving officer

Copyright 2014

SPIEGEL ONLINE

Inside TAO: Documents Reveal Top NSA Hacking Unit

By SPIEGEL Staff

 

The article you are reading originally appeared in German in issue 1/2014 (December 30, 2013) of DER SPIEGEL.

 

Targeting Mexico

 

Mexico's Secretariat of Public Security, which was folded into the new National Security Commission at the beginning of 2013, was responsible at the time for the country's police, counterterrorism, prison system and border police. Most of the agency's nearly 20,000 employees worked at its headquarters on Avenida Constituyentes, an important traffic artery in Mexico City. A large share of the Mexican security authorities under   the auspices of the Secretariat are supervised from the offices there, making Avenida Constituyentes a one-stop shop for anyone seeking to learn more about the country's security apparatus.

 

More, HERE.

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Fresh Leak on US Spying: NSA Accessed Mexican President's Email

By Jens Glüsing, Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

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'Royal Concierge': GCHQ Monitors Diplomats' Hotel Bookings

By Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

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Quantum Spying: GCHQ Used Fake LinkedIn Pages to Target Engineers

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Oil Espionage: How the NSA and GCHQ Spied on OPEC

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Belgacom Attack: Britain's GCHQ Hacked Belgian Telecoms Firm

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Cyber Attack: Belgians Angered by British Spying

© SPIEGEL ONLINE 2013, All Rights Reserved

Fox News

US intelligence assets in Mexico reportedly tied to murdered DEA agent

SCM's Travel Advisory:


September 11 attacks on World Trade Center by Wikipedia

Mexicans are advised to exercise MAXIMUM CAUTION, monitor developments that might affect your safety in the United States because of Hate Crimes. The FBI reports that hate crimes against Latinos rose almost 40 percent between 2003 and 2006, and Hispanic activists say they are being targeted with threats and intimidation.

This is just a recent incident: STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- A rash of recent assaults on Mexican immigrants has heightened tensions in Port Richmond, already on edge following the savage beating of a 25-year-old baker earlier this (April 2010) month.

In addition, no matter what your nationality the US in under permanent risk of terrorism. Visitors could be caught up in attacks targeted at American, British, Canadian, Australian citizens, others. Terrorists may attack official or  civilian targets. Crime rates are higher in the larger cities, such as New York, Los Angeles and Chicago.

 

Many parts of the United States are subject to different natural hazards, including earthquakes, fires or wildfires, floods, extreme heat, hurricanes, landslides and debris flow (mudslides), thunderstorms and lightning, tornadoes, tsunamis, volcanoes (Hawaii, Alaska and Pacific Northwest), winter storms (freezing rain, heavy snow and blizzards) and extreme cold.

 

Tourists are often targeted for petty crimes such as pick-pocketing and theft, particularly on public transport. It is recommended that before visiting your destination point, Google it and write NAME OF CITY TO BE VISITED, then "crime, areas to be avoided & gang activities" to determine your level of threat.  

Come Back Alive, a site dedicated to Dangerous Countries writes on quote: 

"There are more than 200 million guns in the possession of Americans. Most violent acts in the States are the result of robberies, domestic disputes and drug-related violence.

 

Terrorist acts, ranging from the killing of abortionist doctors to the bombing of the World Trade Center, are highly publicized but not considered a real threat to travelers. The threat of robbery or violent crime in inner cities and some tourist areas is real and should be taken seriously. Travel in America is considered safe (by .. Americans), and danger is confined to random violence and inner cities.

 

Those seeking adventure can find it in a New Orleans bar at five in the morning or strolling through South Central L.A. after midnight." .. 

TRAVEL ADVISORY: The Southern Poverty Law Center counted 932 active hate groups in the United States in 2009. Only organizations and their chapters known to be active during 2009 are included. More, HERE.

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Oct. 29, 2009 Washington Post: Obama signs hate crimes law

You Tube

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HATE CRIMES


RACISM AND ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION, by ABC News

MEXICAN HATE RALLY

The New Sport: Latino Hate Crime, ABC News

Mexican beaten by 3 racist Blacks on Staten Island, New York

US Border Patrol Agent Shoots Dead Mexican Teen on Mexican Soil

Border agent details immigrant abuse

Discrimination Against Latinos

American Heritage- KKK Lynching

 

Redneck Attacks Mexican flag

 

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TERRORISM, DRUGS

New report exposes CIA torture & rendition by Nick Harper

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MUST-READ Book: Cocaine Politics by Peter Dale Scott

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Drugs and the Economy - Peter Dale Scott

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Gary Webb on C.I.A. Trafficking of Cocaine

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CIA Torture Jet crashed with 4 Tons of COCAINE

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Former LA Police Officer Mike Ruppert Confronts CIA Director

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'I don't think drug trafficking will ever be stopped': Inside the world of the U.S. agent who went undercover with the cartels:

Mail Online, UK

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Celerino Castillo, by Wikipedia

Powderburns

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Marijuana legalization wins majority support in poll: Los Angeles Times

Marijuana, Officially Legal in Colorado

In 2006, former Mexican president Felipe Calderón launched a massive crackdown against drug trafficking organizations, in conjunction with the United States. Since then, more than 40,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence:

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Council On Foreign Relations

Washington State Gears Up for Marijuana Industry: Voice of America

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Marijuana Legalization Canada: Liberal Party Lays Out Detailed Economic Plan For Pot: The Huffington Post, Canada

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England Wants To Legalize Marijuana Through Cannabis Drug Reform: Inquisitr. Ltd.

More HERE.

A change of scenery by Washington Post

U.S. citizens traveling internationally in 2012, by destination

 

A change of scenery
Source: Office of Travel and Tourism Industries, Commerce Department. The Washington Post. Published on May 24, 2013

Image Credit

Mexico Travel Warning

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling to certain places in Mexico due to threats to safety and security posed by organized criminal groups in the country.
U.S. citizens have been the target of violent crimes, such as kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery by organized criminal groups in various Mexican states.  For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, which can vary, travelers should reference the state-by-state assessments further below.  This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.
General Conditions: 

Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year for study, tourism, and business, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day.  The Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations, and there is no evidence that organized criminal groups have targeted U.S. visitors or residents based on their nationality.  Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that are reported in the border region or in areas along major trafficking routes. 

Nevertheless, U.S. travelers should be aware that the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter organized criminal groups that engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico.  The groups themselves are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity.  Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur anywhere.  U.S. citizens have fallen victim to criminal activity, including homicide, gun battles, kidnapping, carjacking, and highway robbery.  While many of those killed in organized crime-related violence have themselves been involved in criminal activity, innocent persons have also been killed.  The number of U.S. citizens reported to the Department of State as murdered in Mexico was 71 in 2012 and 81 in 2013. 

Gun battles between rival criminal organizations or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico.  Gun battles have occurred in broad daylight on streets and in other public venues, such as restaurants and clubs.  During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily    prevented from leaving the area. Criminal organizations have used stolen cars, buses, and trucks to create roadblocks on major thoroughfares, preventing the military and police from responding to criminal activity. The location and timing of future armed engagements is unpredictable.  We recommend that you defer travel to the areas specifically identified in this Travel Warning and exercise extreme caution when traveling throughout the other areas for which advisories are in effect.
The number of kidnappings throughout Mexico is of particular concern and appears to be on the rise.  According to statistics published by the Mexican Secretaria de Gobernacion (SEGOB), in 2013 kidnappings nationwide increased 20 percent over the previous year.  While kidnappings can occur anywhere, according to SEGOB, during this timeframe, the states with the highest numbers of kidnappings were Tamaulipas, Guerrero, Michoacán, Estado de Mexico, and Morelos.
Additionally, according to a widely publicized study by the agency responsible for national statistics (INEGI, the National Institute of Statistics and Geography), Mexico suffered an estimated 105,682 kidnappings in 2012; only 1,317 were reported to the police.  Police have been implicated in some of these incidents.  Both local and expatriate communities have been victimized.  Nearly 70 kidnappings of U.S. citizens were reported to the U.S. Embassy and consulates in Mexico between January and June of 2014.
U.S. citizens are encouraged to lower their personal profiles and to avoid displaying indicators of wealth such as expensive or expensive-looking jewelry, watches, or cameras.  U.S. citizens are encouraged to maintain awareness of their surroundings and avoid situations in which they may be isolated or stand out as potential victims.

Kidnappings in Mexico have included traditional, "express," and "virtual" kidnappings. Victims of traditional kidnappings are physically abducted and held captive until a ransom is paid for release.  "Express" kidnappings are those in which a victim is abducted for a short time and forced to withdraw money, usually from an ATM, then released.  A "virtual" kidnapping is an extortion-by-deception scheme wherein a victim is contacted by phone and convinced to isolate themselves from family and friends until a ransom is paid.  The victim is coerced (by threat of violence) to remain isolated and to provide phone numbers for the victim's family or loved ones.  The victim's family is then contacted and a ransom for the "kidnapped" extracted.  Recently, some travelers to Mexico staying at hotels as guests have been targets of such "virtual" kidnapping schemes.
Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments.  U.S. government personnel are specifically prohibited from patronizing these establishments in the states of Coahuila, Durango, Zacatecas, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosi, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas.
Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the border region, and U.S. citizens have been murdered in such incidents.  Most victims who complied with carjackers' demands have reported that they were not physically harmed.
Carjackers have shot at vehicles that have attempted to flee.  Incidents have occurred during the day and at night, and carjackers have used a variety of techniques, including roadblocks, bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop, and running vehicles off the road at high speeds.  There are indications that criminals target newer and larger vehicles, especially dark-colored SUVs.  However, even drivers of old sedans and buses coming from the United States have been targeted.  While violent incidents can occur anywhere and at any time, they most frequently occur at night and on isolated roads.  To reduce risk when traveling by road, we strongly urge you to travel between cities throughout Mexico only during daylight hours, to avoid isolated roads, and to use toll roads ("cuotas") whenever possible. 

The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat organized criminal groups.  U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways by car or bus may encounter government checkpoints, staffed by military or law enforcement personnel.  In some places, criminal organizations have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and have killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them.  You should cooperate at all checkpoints. 

The Department imposes restrictions on U.S. government employees' travel in Mexico.  Since July 2010, USG employees are prohibited from driving on non-official travel from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior of Mexico or Central America.  One exception is that personal travel by motor vehicle is permitted on Highway 15 toll road between Hermosillo and Nogales during daylight hours.
U.S. government personnel and their families are prohibited from personal travel to all areas to which it is advised to "defer non-essential travel".  When travel for official purposes is essential, it is conducted with extensive security precautions.  U.S. government personnel and their families are allowed to travel for personal reasons to the areas where no advisory is in effect or where the advisory is to exercise caution.  While the general public is not forbidden from visiting places categorized under "defer non-essential travel," U.S. government personnel will not be able to respond quickly to an emergency situation in those areas due to security precautions that must be taken by U.S. government personnel to travel to those areas. 

For more information on road safety and crime along Mexico's roadways, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information

State-by-State Assessment: 

Below is a state-by-state assessment of security conditions throughout Mexico.  Travelers should be mindful that even if no advisories are in effect for a given state, crime and violence can still occur.  For general information about travel and other conditions in Mexico, see our Country Specific Information

More, HERE

 

The New York Times

Mexican Journalist Is Fired After Report About First Lady

Carmen Aristegui, who has a long record of exposing the foibles of Mexico’s elite and exposed a possible conflict of interest involving the first lady, was fired Sunday from MVS Radio.

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Mexican Political Family Has Close Ties to Ruling Party, and Homes in the U.S.

The properties stand in contrast to the working-man image promoted by José Murat Casab, a longtime party insider, and his son, a top housing official.

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Towers of Secrecy

Stream of Foreign Wealth Flows to Elite New York Real Estate

From Frommer's

Introduction to Mexico
The Best Cultural Experiences
The Best Beach Vacations
The Best Active Vacations
The Best Places to Get Away from It All
Getting There
Getting Around
Fast Facts
In One Week
In Two Weeks

MEXICO POPULAR DESTINATIONS 

See All 37 Destinations

Acapulco

Baja California

Cabo San Lucas

Campeche

Cancun

Chichen Itza

Colima

Mexico City

Yucatan Peninsula

MORE MEXICO TRAVEL, HERE.

© 2013 The New York Times Company

The Naturalization Process and Current Trends in Immigration in the United States: By Gender, By Age and By Marital Status

In 2011, the total number of persons naturalizing was 694,193. The leading countries of birth of new citizens were Mexico (94,783), India (45,985), the Philippines (42,520), the People's Republic of China (32,864), and Colombia (22,693). The largest number of persons naturalizing lived in California (151,183), Florida (87,309), and New York (76,603).

Historical trends have shown that the average number of persons that are naturalized annually has increased from less than 120,000 during the 1950s and 1960s to 210,000 during the 1980s, to 500,000 during the 1990s, and to 680,000 between 2000 and 2009. Naturalizations rose sharply during the mid-1990s because of various factors that include: 1) the 2.7 million undocumented immigrants legalized under the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 making them eligible for citizenship; 2) legislative efforts to restrict public benefits for non-citizens; and 3) the implementation of a mandatory program requiring replacement of permanent resident cards issued before 1977.

More, HERE.

 

Information submitted to Security Corner in Mexico by Cooper Brimm, American Immigration Center

16 Ways to Get Through the Airport Faster

With airports that seem busier than ever, airline staffing reductions creating longer lines at check-in and airport security wait times that can be entirely unpredictable, these days the old airport "two-hour" rule often leaves just minutes to spare to buy a magazine, grab a snack or hustle your kids into the bathroom. Saving a few extra minutes here and there along the way can add up in your favor; here are 16 tips to get you from your front door to your seat on the plane as quickly and painlessly as possible -- as well as some ideas to keep you moving no matter what is going on with your flight.

More, HERE

© 2013 The Independent Traveler, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

15 Travel Tips to Get Through TSA Security


The savviest of travelers understand the security requirements and plan ahead. In the United States, airport security is run by the Transportation Security Administration, a division of the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees border security as well as technological research, response to national disasters and terrorism, and intelligence analysis.

 

These tips reflect TSA policies as of November 2012. And for students enrolled in a homeland security program, knowing this information is vital and applicable to your future career.

 

More, HERE.

© 2013, Master of Homeland Security

COMMUNITY NEWS

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¿DE VISITA EN LA CIUDAD DE MEXICO, D. F.?

Panadería La Espiga


INSURGENTES SUR 455, HIPODROMO CONDESA, CUAUHTEMOC, C.P. 06170, DF. Tel: (55)5564-7763(55)5564-7763 (55)5564-7763(55)5564-7763 

"Ir al metro Chilpancingo es una de mis aventuras favoritas porque puedo visitar la panadería La Espiga. Este lugar lleva más de veinte años en el mismo lugar y tiene cosas deliciosas que ofrecer. Su tamaño es enorme, y dentro puedes encontrar comida, refrescos y bebidas, postres, entre otras cosas. El primer pasillo tiene papas y comida chatarra que puedes consumir. El segundo pasillo tiene todos los refrescos y las aguas al tiempo, en el fondo podrás encontrar los refrigeradores que tienen los refrescos y aguas frías, así como hielo". Más, AQUI.

 

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¿DE VISITA EN ZIPOLITE, OAXACA?

Restaurante La Pasión by Trip Advisor
La PasiOn

Jaime Díaz Arguelles
La Pasión, Col. Roca Blanca
Tel. no. 9581091824
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Restaurante El Alquimista by Trip Advisor

Marisquería, Pasta & Pizza

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Autos con 15 Años de Antiguedad Dejarán de Circular en el D. F. Dos Veces a la Semana

http://www.solucionpolitica.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/hoy-no-circula.jpg

CREDITO DE LA IMAGEN: SOLUCION POLITICA

 

Cars Older than 15 Years will not circulate twice a Week
Tanya Müller García
Tanya Muller García, Secretaria del Medio Ambiente del Distrito Federal

 

Mexico City's Environment Secretariat

HOY NO CIRCULA

New Program of (Your Car) Does not Circulate in Mexico City. More information, HERE by Wikipedia

S P E C I A L   A N N O U N C E M E N T

Olivier Tschumi
Olivier Tschumi, a Swiss citizen, relocated to Mexico 22 years ago. He was kidnapped while jogging with his two dogs in a park north of Cuernavaca in the morning of December 19, 2010. A ransom was paid to the kidnappers on December 21 of same year, but Olivier continues to be in captivity to this date. Authorities have no leads to the kidnappers.

Security Corner in Mexico has been requested by Mr. Tschumi's family in Switzerland to have this information available to our readers in the event you happen to know or hear of Olivier's whereabouts. The Mexican Federal Attorney General's Office (PGR) is offering $5 million pesos as a reward to anybody providing information that will lead to the whereabouts of Mr. Tschumi

If you have any information, please write to Olivier's sister ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). Olivier has a 12-year old waiting to hear from you too. More information, in Spanish HERE
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Olivier Tschumi, citoyen suisse, s'est installé au Mexique il y a 22 ans. Au matin du 19 décembre 2010,  Il a été enlevé  lors d'un jogging avec ses deux chiens dans une forêt au nord de Cuernavaca. Une rançon a été payée selon les exigences des ravisseurs le 21 décembre de la même année. Olivier n'a pas été libéré, il a disparu depuis ce jour. L'enquête, menée par les  autorités mexicaines piétine.  Désespérée, la famille Tschumi en Suisse implore l'aide de tout le monde pour retrouver Olivier. Toute information concernant les ravisseurs et  sa localisation sera utile et  bienvenue. La famille d'Olivier a grand besoin de votre aide et vous remercie.

Le Bureau du procureur général fédéral mexicain offre $ 5.000.000 pesos en récompense à qui fournira des informations conduisant à retrouver Monsieur Tschumi. Si vous avez des informations, s'il vous plaît écrivez à la sœur d'Olivier, Email:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Olivier a une fille de 12 ans qui espère retrouver son papa grâce à votre aide! Plus d'informations en espagnol ICI

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Culture of Safe Travel, Crime & Loss Prevention

 

VIDEOS

 

INTRODUCTION (English language) 

INTRODUCCION A ESQUINA DE LA SEGURIDAD


PREVENTING KIDNAPPING EXPRESS IN MEXICO CITY

MEXICO CITY SUBWAY SYSTEM, SAFE, EFFICIENT, INEXPENSIVE


WORDS OF ADVISE FROM SUBWAY SECURITY PERSONNEL

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Mexico City Hash House Harriers

INTERNATIONAL DRINKING Jarra CLUB WITH A RUNNING PROBLEM

www.mchhh.com

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www.mchhh.com

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SOCIAL SERVICES

 

Cuernavaca's Center for Happy Sr. Citizens, contributing to the enhancement of life quality. Monday to Friday: 8AM to 14:00 hrs. Among other courses specially designed for the elderly: literature, history, philosophy, IT, English, Spanish, artistic workshops: music, painting, cuisine, manual art; sports and entertainment: dancing, zumba, danzon, yoga, aqua-aerobics, reading. Emotions' handling, conferences, legal advise for inheritance, tanatology.

More information: Río Amacuzac 435, Col. Vistahermosa, tels. (01- 777) 221-6250(01- 777) 221-6250 Contact person: Alejandra Morales Leija

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American Benevolent Society

 

American Benevolent Society Newsletter by American_Benevolent

Paseo de la Reforma 1870-201 Lomas de Chapultepec, Miguel Hidalgo. Mexico, D.F. 11000 Mexico

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B E W A R E

New fines in the D.F. as of the first of January, 2015


1.- $1,290 pesos for failing to "verificar" the car plus $790.00 to get the ¨"verification" (smog emission test)
2.- THIS IS BIG - $12,000 FOR USE OF A CELL PHONE.  DON'T EVEN HAVE IT IN YOUR HAND.
3.- $700 for not using your seatbelt, even the back seat.
4.- $2,500 for expired plates plus the cost of the renewal.
5. You don't have to pay registration on brand new cars.
6. $18,000 fine if you hit someone in an enebriated condition plus 3-9 years in jail.
7.- $3,500 if you are stopped and fail to pass the alcohol test.
8.- $1,500 for playing the radio at more than 50 decibeles.
9.- PLEASE SHARE THIS INFORMATION.  

Remember that as an foreigner there are very strict limits to participation in political activities.  When in doubt, don't.
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New "HOY NO CIRCULA" rules go into effect Tuesday, July 1, 2014‏

Here's an explanation of how the new program "hoy no circula" works, starting TUESDAY, July 1st

 

If you have any information that is different from this PLEASE let us know right away so we can send it out. Brand new vehicles that have the hologram 00 are able to drive for two years, the car will have to update the hologram  at the expiration date and be inspected . You have two months after the expiration date to renew the hologram (have the car inspected).
Hologram 0, if your vehicle does not pass the 00 you will be given the hologram 0.  You can still drive everyday of the month, but instead of the two years permit, the expiration is set for six months, then you will have to renew the hologram. For information on the dates of the renewal, the link of the government will be posted at the end of the mail.
Hologram 1, this hologram is usually for vehicles between 9 and 15 years of usage. the vehicles with the hologram number 1 will not be able to circulate two Saturdays a month and one day on midweek. (the Saturday depends on the license plate of the car, see the government link for more details) and one day on midweek that also depends on the license plate of the car.

And there will be the new hologram 2.

 

According to the news of El Universal vehicles with the hologram number 2 that are over 15 years in circulation will not be able to circulate any Saturday of the month and also one day midweek.

 

It seems that the government is willing to change the hologram 2 for the hologram 1 if the vehicles pass the regulation test. This regulation will start on Tuesday July 1st. of 2014.  For more details here is the link of the news. And here is the link for the government program "Hoy no circula"

 

Talking history: The American Benevolent Society turns 140 by Catherine Dunn, Insidemex

 

History

Oprima ESTE ENLACE electrónico para ver las noticias actualizadas de México de CNN en Español de esta fecha

Un tribunal revoca la orden de reunión entre Aristegui y MVS

Un juez había dado la orden de que la periodista y el grupo que rescindió de sus servicios se reunieran para conciliar el conflicto

El INE baja un 'spot' del PAN sobre Jesús Valencia

La Comisión de Quejas y Denuncias del Instituto determinó que el promocional es calumnioso contra el candidato a diputado federal Ir a la nota

INE baja spot del PAN contra el PRI en Sonora

Con spot, 'Cuau' inicia su 'partido' por Cuernavaca

Voto 2015

El PES declina en Querétaro para apoyar al PRI

Xóchitl lleva ofrenda de desagravio por #LadyRotonda

PRD y PAN explican ausencia en pacto de Guerrero

"Me llevaría bien con el presidente": 'el Bronco'

Felipe Cantú promete eliminar tenencia en Nuevo León

Últimas noticias

Detención de criminal activa bloqueos en Tamaulipas

Vehículo con material tóxico es robado en Tlaxcala

Alondra paga el error de una madre que busca su hija video

'Ley Ficrea' alinea a financieras rurales CNNExpansión

Los 'hackers' de la Casa Blanca hablan ruso: Informe

Un juez aprueba un acuerdo entre jugadores y la NFL

Twitter muestra al club inglés más seguido del mundo

Protestas por muerte de hombre negro crecen en EU

Eva Longoria pasea en EcoBici por el DF

Tabasco recupera material radioactivo robado video

Kim Jong Un, Raúl Castro y Vladimir Putin, juntos en Rusia

Kenny Bayless será el réferi en la pelea del siglo

El papa visitará Cuba en septiembre video

'El Libro Vaquero' cabalga para seducir lectores video

Nacional

La 'herida abierta' de Armenia, expuesta en México Video

Culpables. Corte de Malasia falla contra mexicanos

La orden de reunión Aristegui-MVS es revocada

El PES declina en Querétaro para apoyar al PRI

Vehículo con material tóxico es robado en Tlaxcala

Muertes de Apatzingán, remedio necesario: sacerdote

Falta transparencia en nuevo aeropuerto, acusan ONG

Detención de criminal activa bloqueos en TamaulipasVideo

Alondra paga el error de una madre que busca su hijaVideo

Los claroscuros de la reforma anticorrupción

Video

"La sal de la tierra" muestra la condición humanaVideo

La tensión entre España y Venezuela sube de tonoVideo

¿Fin de la operación 'Tormenta Decisiva'?Video

Tabasco recupera material radioactivo robadoVideo

Venezuela que lidera un gran proyecto de GoogleVideo

Francisco, "el Papa rebelde y su nueva iglesia"Video

Un 'Drone' con material radioactivo en Japón Video

Mundo

Culpables: Corte de Malasia falla contra mexicanos

Los magistrados desestiman argumentos de la defensa y ratifican la pena de muerte a hermanos González Villarreal, acusados de narcotráfico Ir a la nota

El narco mexicano 'extiende sus ramas' a Japón

La familia de mexicanos en Malasia, decaída

Chile, en alerta roja por erupción de Calbuco

La autoridades emitieron otra alerta por una segunda erupción, incluso más fuerte que la primera; unas 270 familias habían sido evacuadas Ir a la nota

Un volcán japonés crea una isla

Isla japonesa, formada en 2013, ha crecido 11 veces

Michelle Obama, ¿muy joven para tener 51 años?

Protestas por muerte de hombre negro crecen en EU

Chile, en alerta roja por erupción de Calbuco

El Talibán anuncia aumento de ataques en Afganistán

Kim Jong Un y Raúl Castro visitarán Rusia

Obama no llamará 'genocidio' a la masacre armenia

Jefa de la DEA renuncia tras escándalos de agentes

'Drone' con material radioactivo es hallado en JapónVideo

© 2006 Derechos Reservados Expansión, S.A. DE C.V.

El Universal has no official political affiilation and is the most read newspaper in Mexico

MEXICO NEWS IN ENGLISH BY EL UNIVERSAL, HERE

FORD ANNOUNCES US$2.5 BILLION INVESTMENT IN MEXICO
Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto announced the massive investment in the automotive sector | Full Story

Authorities confirm arrest of criminal leader in Reynosa

Mexican reforms will take longer: IMF

Measles outbreak linked to Disneyland is officially over

Scientists to explore crater in Mexico linked to dinosaur extinction

Google to favor 'mobile-friendly' sites in search results on smartphones

Herrera denies verbal fight with U.S. journalists

WORLD | More taxes for immigrants

Their contributions would increase significantly under Obama's executive action

NATION | PGR investigates document forgery ring

The ring operating in Mexico and Colombia falsified documents for immigration paperwork


U.S. SUPPORTS MEXICO´S EFFORTS TO SAVE THE VAQUITA

U.S. Ambassador to Mexico, Anthony Wayne, recalled that the U.S. and Mexico have worked together for decades to protect natural resources and biodiversity in North America. | Full story

STATES | Most slave kids work in six states

Labor Minister Alfonso Navarrete said that they are some 2.5 million children

BLIND PEOPLE MARCH TOWARDS THE ZÓCALO

They protest over the removal of their sale stands from Mexico City metropolitan subway system. | Full story

FUEL DELIVERY TRUCK COLLIDES WITH TRAIN IN AGUASCALIENTES

The heavy-loaded cargo truck tried to pass the railway crossing before the convoy | Full Story

NATION | DISENCHANTMENT WILL AFFECT THE NEXT ELECTIONS

Experts expect a low turnout and say that insecurity and Ayotzinapa will influence voters.

NATION | Child abuse is on the rise in Mexico

In 2014 there were 39,516 reported cases of abuse against minors in the country

CITY | Most crimes take place in five districts

They are considered the most dangerous areas of Mexico City


The company said on Twitter that eight firefighting boats were tackling the blaze, which erupted overnight on the Abkatun Permanente platform in the oil-rich Bay of Campeche. | Full story

FINANCE | MEXICO WANTS CHINA INVOLVED IN NEW AIRPORT

After train blunder, Mexico wants Chinese state-run firms involved in Mexico City airport

NATION | Ayotzinapa parents ask help of gang boss

Several families hung banners asking for help from leader of Los Rojos cartel

Alleged leader of Los Zetas arrested in Tamaulipas

Mexico regrets term of 'generalized torture' used by U.N. Rapporteur

América Móvil proposes name for tower business spin-off

JAMES BOND SAYS GOODBYE TO MEXICO

Spectre production began removing scenery from the Zócalo. | Full story

CLASH BETWEEN POLICE CITIZENS OF GUERRERO LEAVES 4 DEAD

The incident happened last night in the community of San Juan del Reparo. | Full story

VICENTE FERNANDEZ IN THE HOSPITAL

The singer was subjected to an emergency surgery and is doing fine, according to one of his sons | Full Story

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Oprima AQUI para ver noticias actualizadas del periódico El Universal

LAS 147 HORAS QUE CAMBIARON A ALONDRA

Metrópoli

Justifican los partidos opacidad de candidatos

No hacer públicas las declaraciones es por seguridad, mencionan. IEDF: es necesario conocer a los aspirantes para votar por ellos

Difunden perfiles 7 aspirantes del PRD

Monreal, Muñoz Soria y Barrios dicen sí a un debate

Propone Razú "La Empleadora" para MH

Coyoacán, históricamente perredista

Gráfico Elecciones 2015. Bajo Nuevas Reglas

Gráfico Nueve estados en juego

Nación

Alondra regresa. Historia binacional de torpezas

Padres recuperan a su hija llevada por Interpol a EU. Alistan acción legal; "involucrados se equivocaron"

"No busqué lastimar a la familia Luna"

"Que encuentres a tu hija"

Autoridades no asumen la culpa por la sustracción

Ven graves violaciones; CNDH abre expediente

Editorial EL UNIVERSAL Alondra: justicia fallida

Video La mujer que reclama a Alondra

Fotogalería Alondra Luna regresa a casa en Guanajuato

Audio "Ya no le tengo coraje": Alondra a Dorotea

Metrópoli

Revocan amparo a Carmen Aristegui

Fallo suspende encuentro entre la comunicadora y MVS. Ella debe probar que violaron sus derechos, resuelve tribunal

Bajo Reserva Aristegui (malas) noticiasCiro Gómez Leyva Aristegui: malas noticiasRicardo Alemán Tiran el montaje de Aristegui; ¿no que no?
Periodismo de datos

Aduanas, en alerta contra el crimen

La seguridad había sido vulnerado por bandas criminales que lograron introducir grandes cargamentos de droga, cocaína y metanfetamina, principalmente

Cultura

Juan Goytisolo recibe el Premio Cervantes

Goytisolo, de 84 años, censuró el reciente proyecto de búsqueda de los huesos de Miguel de Cervantes, autor de El Quijote

Discurso íntegro de Juan Goytisolo al recibir el Premio Cervantes

Nación

SRE lamenta pena de muerte a mexicanos en Malasia

El gobierno de México ratificó su posición contraria a la aplicación de la pena capital

Ratifican pena de muerte para mexicanos en Malasia

Estados

Tamaulipas: atrapan otro capo; desatan caos

Cartera

México, clave para la expansión de gigantes cerveceros

Metrópoli

Cae mando con tarjeta clonada

De no existir previa autorización, queda expresamente prohibida la publicación, retransmisión, edición y cualquier otro uso de los contenidos de El Universal



Proceso is a weekly magazine, renowned for its left-wing journalism

Oprima AQUI para ver las noticias actualizadas de la revista Proceso de esta fecha

“México es la estrella de América Latina… pero hay que tener paciencia”: Banco Mundial

Revoca tribunal encuentro de Aristegui con MVS

MVS interpone queja para cambiar a juez que dio entrada a amparo de Aristegui


22 de abril de 2015

MÉXICO, D.F., (proceso.com.mx).- Grupo MVS interpuso el martes 21 de abril un recurso de queja ante un tribunal colegiado de circuito para solicitar el cambio …

"Comprar casas a contratistas y darles contratos es corrupción”, reprocha Jorge Ramos a Peña

Defrauda gobierno de Javier Duarte a 750 maestros de la Sección 56

Captura de líder criminal desata balaceras y narcobloqueos en Tamaulipas

Aprueban diputados Ley Ficrea; “es electorera”, acusa oposición


22 de abril de 2015
MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Diputados de PRI, PRD, PVEM y Panal aprobaron la nueva Ley de Ahorro y Crédito que permitirá establecer un fideicomiso de mil 720 millones de pesos para pagar a los usuarios defraudados por Ficrea. En medio de recriminaciones …

A través de narcomantas, ligan a cantante y candidato con La Familia


22 de abril de 2015
CHILPANCINGO, Gro. (apro).- El diputado federal con licencia y candidato a diputado local por Movimiento Ciudadano (MC), Marino Miranda Salgado, y su suplente, el cantante de narcocorridos y alcalde perredista de Acapetalhuaya, Eleuterio Aranda Salgado El Solitario del Sur fueron …

Culpa Ebrard a Mancera y Ortega por “desastre en la Línea 12”


22 de abril de 2015
MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Este miércoles Marcelo Ebrard sostuvo que su sucesor al frente del Gobierno del DF, así como el actual director del Sistema de Transporte Colectivo Metro, Miguel Ángel Mancera y Joel Ortega, respectivamente, son los responsables del actual …

Investiga la CNDH caso de menor sustraída por la Interpol


22 de abril de 2015
MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- La Comisión Nacional de Derechos Humanos (CNDH) anunció el inicio de una investigación por el caso de Alondra Luna Núñez, adolescente de …

Asesinan a cinco mujeres en Edomex, una de ellas enfermera


22 de abril de 2015

TOLUCA, Edomex. (apro).- En las últimas 48 horas, un comando de cinco sujetos asesinó a una madre y su hijo en los límites de las …

Cae uno de los secuestradores más buscados en el Estado de México


22 de abril de 2015
TOLUCA, Edomex. (proceso.com.mx).- Oswaldo Torres Macedo, considerado uno de los 125 presuntos delincuentes más buscados en el Estado de México, fue detenido por elementos de …

Mientras discuten ley anticorrupción, Romero Deschamps ojea catálogo de yates


22 de abril de 2015

MÉXICO, D.F., (proceso.com.mx).- Durante la discusión del Sistema Nacional …

Ordena IFAI a Pemex revelar entrega de recursos al sindicato


22 de abril de 2015

TUXTLA GUTIÉRREZ, Chis. (apro).- El Instituto Federal de Acceso …

Corren a candidatos y les impiden hacer campaña en San Miguel Canoa, Puebla


22 de abril de 2015

PUEBLA, Pue. (apro).- Habitantes de San Miguel Canoa advirtieron …

Pide PAN al INE fiscalizar recursos de Claudia Pavlovich


22 de abril de 2015

HERMOSILLO, Son. (apro).- La dirigencia estatal del PAN solicitó …

Boicotea guardia comunitaria acto de candidata perredista en Guerrero


22 de abril de 2015
CHILPANCINGO, Gro. (apro).- Integrantes de la guardia comunitaria del …

Dish deberá pagar 7.7 mdp a Televisa y TV Azteca, confirma INE


22 de abril de 2015
MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- El Consejo General del Instituto Nacional …

Realizan operativo en centro joyero de los Abarca Pineda


22 de abril de 2015

Hallan cápsula radiactiva robada en Tabasco


22 de abril de 2015

Difunden nuevo video que exhibe complicidades entre Rodrigo Vallejo y “La Tuta”


22 de abril de 2015

Tenía “El Chuyín” dos tigres de bengala en su rancho en Chihuahua


22 de abril de 2015

Por amenazas cancela “El Komander” concierto en Nuevo Laredo


22 de abril de 2015

México debe acostumbrarse a normalización de precios de petróleo: Amcham


22 de abril de 2015

Confirman visita del Papa Francisco a Cuba


22 de abril de 2015
PROCESO 2007
Edición 2007, 18 de Abril, 2015

Las omisiones de Osorio Chong


18 de abril de 2015
El reportaje “El gusto de vivir en las Lomas” (Proceso 2006) consigna que Miguel Ángel Osorio Chong respondió a un cuestionamiento de los autores de la investigación y que negó ser propietario de las casas de Bosque de Manzanos …

Carta del secretario de Gobernación


18 de abril de 2015
Señor director: En abril de 2010, en la edición número 1745 de la revista Proceso, se pretendió involucrarme con el crimen organizado sin prueba alguna. …

La ley blanda salva al funcionario


18 de abril de 2015
El conflicto de interés está muy blandamente regulado en México, tanto en las leyes que lo establecen como en las instituciones que las aplican. Ese fue un tema que en su momento combatí fuertemente en el IFAI (por ahí …

Bajo sospecha de conflicto de interés


18 de abril de 2015
Tres especialistas en transparencia consultadas por este semanario coinciden en un punto: la necesidad de investigar el posible conflicto de interés en el que pudo haber incurrido el secretario de Gobernación. “El que haya rentado no lo exime de un posible …

Reporte Especial

Apatzingán, 6 de enero: “¡Mátenlos…!”


18 de abril de 2015
El pasado 6 de enero, decenas de policías federales irrumpieron en el centro de Apatzingán y abrieron fuego contra civiles, lo que causó la muerte de por lo menos 16 personas y heridas a muchas más. Sin embargo, Alfredo …

Sobrevivientes perseguidos


18 de abril de 2015
APATZINGÁN, MICH.- Miembros de las Fuerzas Rurales sobrevivientes de la matanza del 6 de enero en Apat­zingán, quienes fueron detenidos y posteriormente liberados por órdenes del juez Jorge Wong Aceituno, denuncian que se ha emprendido una campaña de acoso …

“El virrey” y su herencia de sangre


18 de abril de 2015
Alfredo Castillo Cervantes no tiene empacho en decir que es amigo del presidente Enrique Peña Nieto. También lo son sus primos Humberto Castillejos Cervantes, responsable de la Consejería Jurídica de la Presidencia, y el senador con licencia Raúl Cervantes …

Violencia

La “solución militar” dispara los homicidios


18 de abril de 2015
Tras el fracaso de Felipe Calderón en su guerra contra el narcotráfico, el régimen priista trata de ocultar la magnitud de la violencia en el país y mantiene al Ejército en funciones policiacas. Pero un estudio estadístico realizado por …

Estados

A las presiones, Rogelio Ortega respondió con “tolerancia extrema”


18 de abril de 2015
Hace medio año el perredista Rogelio Ortega comenzó a gobernar un estado en llamas: Guerrero. El mandatario constitucional, Ángel Aguirre, había renunciado debido al ataque contra normalistas de Ayotzinapa. El clima social ardía. A seis meses, la situación en …

Nerviosismo electoral


18 de abril de 2015
CHILPANCINGO, GRO.- Aunque el Consejo General del Instituto Electoral y de Participación Ciudadana de Guerrero (IEPC) se renovó en octubre pasado y salieron los siete consejeros identificados con el PRI y el PRD, el órgano aún no se sacude …

Política

Ante el Verde, un país impotente


18 de abril de 2015
Con excepción del PRI, el resto de las fuerzas políticas con registro electoral y decenas de miles de ciudadanos demandan reiteradamente que se le retire el registro al Partido Verde Ecologista de México por sus constantes violaciones a la …

PAN vs. PRI: de relojes a relojes


18 de abril de 2015
Un joven enfurece cuando le muestran la fotografía de un personaje que ostenta relojes de lujo. –¿Qué opinas de que el presidente del PRI presuma relojes de más de 2 millones de pesos? –¿Qué opino? ¡Es una chingadera! …

Religión

Con base en argucias, el cura abusador permanece impune


18 de abril de 2015
El defensor del joven Jesús Romero Colín insiste en que el cardenal Norberto Rivera debe sujetarse a las leyes y denunciar ante la Procuraduría General de Justicia del Distrito Federal al sacerdote Carlos López Valdés, quien abusó de su …


Más, AQUI.
Last Updated on Thursday, 23 April 2015 08:12
 
NSA & Facebook Work Together; Lies & Deceptions On The Left: The Politics Of Self Destruction By Prof. James Petras; Costa Rican Ambassador Fired For Defending Venezuelan Government Amid Escalating War; Narcos Pagaron 'Fiestas de Sexo' A Agentes De La DEA
Sunday, 22 February 2015 12:48


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Home

The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners - Public Service

For a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper or news site through the use of its journalistic resources, including the use of stories, editorials, cartoons, photographs, graphics, videos, databases, multimedia or interactive presentations or other visual material, a gold medal. Awarded to The Washington Post for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security. and Awarded to The Guardian US for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, helping through aggressive reporting to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.

Finalists also nominated as a finalist in this category was Newsday, Long Island, N.Y., for its use of in-depth reporting and digital tools to expose shootings, beatings and other concealed misconduct by some Long Island police officers, leading to the formation of a grand jury and an official review of police accountability.

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INTERNATIONAL

Secret Service tightens rules for agency car use

Secret Service agents drove through active bomb probe

Carol D. Leonnig and Peter Hermann  

New details emerged about the late-night incident at the White House and two agents suspected of drinking and driving.
The Post’s View: Yet another embarrassment for Secret Service

Official: Co-pilot hid illness from his employer

Torn-up doctor’s notes were found in Andreas Lubitz’s home, a German prosecutor said, adding to the suspicion that Lubitz had been undergoing psychological treatments over the years.

Reports: Pilot used ax on cockpit door

A Lost Boy-turned-chess master contemplates his next move

Juac plays chess at the NYC Chess office. (Jonathan Newton/Post)

Majur Juac learned survival not on the 64 squares of a chess board but on the hopeless trails of his youth in Sudan. Now the national chess master looks to advance — if he can afford to.

Saudi-led military campaign could end in ‘days,’ Yemeni minister says

Saudi-led military campaign could <br />end in ‘days,’ Yemeni minister says

Ships steamed toward the coast in an Arab offensive against rebels aiming to take over Yemen.

Pakistan’s history of fighting Saudi Arabia’s wars

What happens when you find out a year of college costs $71,000

What happens when you find out <br />a year of college costs $71,000

NYU is now including transportation costs in its sticker prices, bringing the total to a staggering amount.

Major publisher retracts 43 scientific papers amid fake peer-review scandal

Major publisher retracts 43 scientific papers amid fake peer-review scandal

An investigation found a scheme to “deceive” editors by suggesting fake reviewers for articles.

Can I congratulate my once-morbidly obese colleague on her weight loss?

Can I congratulate my once-morbidly obese colleague on her weight loss?

LIVE Q&A | The advice columnist answers questions about the strange train we call life.

For richer or poorer: The challenges of marrying outside your class

For richer or poorer: The challenges <br />of marrying outside your class

OUTLOOK | Financial stability during childhood can shape marriages in many surprising ways.

10 classic campaign ads from famous politicians — before they were famous

10 classic campaign ads from famous politicians — before they were famous

THE FIX | Check out these early attempts by Rick Perry, Bill Clinton and Sarah Palin to woo voters.

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MEXICO NEWS

Image Credit

Parents of 43 missing students marked the six-month anniversary of their disappearance with a march of a few thousand supporters Thursday, urging fellow Mexicans not to abandon them but drawing far smaller numbers than rallies last year.

A Mexican mining industry group says three miners were killed earlier this month in the southern state of Guerrero.

The producer of the new James Bond thriller "Spectre" denies that the script was changed to get incentives in Mexico.

Far from the sprawling, all-inclusive resorts of Mexico's Los Cabos is a part of the Baja California peninsula that few tourists ever see, but should.

Once upon a time, Mexican marijuana was the gold standard for U.S. pot smokers. But in the new world of legal markets and gourmet weed, aficionados here are looking to the United States and Europe for the good stuff.

The head of Mexico's circus owners' association says his group's animals may die or be put down because of a ban on animal acts in circuses.

The Mexican navy has detained 15 Cuban men found aboard a small, home-made boat just off the tip of Mexico's Yucatan peninsula.

1 migrant killed, 1 wounded in attack on train in Mexico

One Honduran youth was shot to death and another migrant was wounded when assailants attacked Central American migrants riding a freight train in the central Mexico state of Puebla.

Mexico's Supreme Court on Wednesday ordered the release of a Mexican-American jailed on a homicide conviction since 1992, ruling he had been tortured.

Mexico seizes quarter-ton of opium paste in Guerrero state

The Mexican army says soldiers have seized 229 kilograms (505 pounds) of opium paste hidden in buried containers in the mountains of southern Guerrero state.

The crusading host of Mexico's top-rated national news radio program has been fired in a case that many fear is a blow to freedom of expression.

Mexico's latest experiment in free speech has already generated its own media mini-tempest.
A musician was kidnapped early Sunday as he played for a crowd of about 400 people at a bar in northern Mexico, and his dead body was found shortly thereafter, a state official said.
A Mexican government commission for victims' rights may pay tens of thousands of dollars in reparations to relatives of those killed in the army's June 30 slaying of criminal suspects after most of them had surrendered.
Once upon a time, Mexican marijuana was the gold standard for U.S. pot smokers. But in the new world of legal markets and gourmet weed, aficionados here are looking to the United States and Europe for the good stuff.

Young Mexicans are being held for months without charge in shelters across the United States.

Mayoral candidate found slain in southern Mexico state

Mexican authorities said Wednesday that they found a missing mayoral candidate slain in the southern state of Guerrero, scene of the disappearance of 43 students from a teachers college last fall.
Mexico's best charro horsemen, wearing traditional wide-brimmed sombreros, lassoed galloping mares, flipped bulls by their tails and tested their mettle atop spirited horses on a recent weekend in Mexico City.

The original script reportedly included an attempt to kill the Mexico City mayor, but Mexican officials preferred the assassination attempt be against "an international leader."

Air traffic controllers at the Mexico City airport flew a drone to get footage for a dinner.

A group of Mexican media outlets and civil society groups have launched MexicoLeaks, a digital platform to receive information leaks that could lead to corruption investigations.

Mexican kids held for months as punishment for border-crossing

Suspected smugglers, and others, have been held without charge in shelters across the country.

Lawmaker says immigrants released by Obama commit a murder a day

A former prosecutor and ambassador who has been questioned about his public service record and close ties to President Enrique Pena Nieto was voted late Tuesday onto Mexico's Supreme Court.
Mexican officials say they will mount a joint state, federal and municipal effort to recover the mummified bodies of two climbers from Mexico's highest mountain.
He's a nightclubber, a joker, a charismatic rags-to-riches soccer star. Now Cuauhtemoc Blanco wants to be mayor of one of Mexico's more prominent cities, Cuernavaca.
The clamor to crack down on laundering drug money was loud in 2010 when Wachovia National Bank was found to have let $110 million from Mexico be sent through its accounts. It grew two years later when HSBC Holdings PLC agreed to pay $1.9 billion to settle violations that included letting hundreds of millions of dollars from drug cartels flow through one of the world's largest banks.
Mexico's central bank auctioned off $200 million in dollars Friday to shore up the peso as it neared a historic low against the U.S. currency.
Mexican police and soldiers on Wednesday captured Omar Trevino Morales, widely considered to be the most important leader of the Zetas drug cartel that once carved a path of brutal bloodshed along the country's northern border with the U.S.

The rattletrap sedan cruised the streets of Iguala, its roof crowned by a loudspeaker blaring headlines from the day's newspaper: "Another killed! Another killed!"

The head of Mexico's circus owners' association says his group's animals may die or be put down because of a ban on animal acts in circuses.

The body of a Mexican man shot dead by police last month has been flown to Mexico and buried in the man's home village, the Mexican Consulate in Seattle said Friday.

Mexican police and soldiers on Wednesday captured Omar Trevino Morales, widely considered to be the most important leader of the Zetas drug cartel that once carved a path of brutal bloodshed along the country's northern border with the U.S., a federal official said.

Five months after 43 students from a rural teachers college in Mexico's Guerrero state disappeared, marches by relatives and protesters continued, some turning violent with confrontations like what was seen Tuesday at a metro station in Mexico's capital. In Michoacan state, federal police captured Servando "La Tuta" Gomez, one of Mexico's most-wanted drug lords.
Security officials in the northeast Mexico state of Tamaulipas say they have killed four gunmen in a town near the U.S. border.

Officials said Friday that climbers have found a second mummified body in a glacier on Mexico's tallest peak, and said they may be the remains of climbers missing since a 1959 avalanche on the peak.

Mexican police and soldiers on Wednesday captured Omar Trevino Morales, widely considered to be the most important leader of the Zetas drug cartel that once carved a path of brutal bloodshed along the country's northern border with the U.S.

Servando Gómez Martínez, who led the Knights Templar cartel, was found last week by Mexican police.
Mexican authorities said Tuesday they staged 153 raids over the last year on a train known as "La Bestia" that rolled toward the U.S. border crowded with hundreds of Central American migrants.
President Enrique Pena faced new pressure Tuesday, this time for his choices for attorney general and to fill a vacant seat on Mexico's highest court.

Mexico City former mayor breaks with leftist PRD party

Former Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard said Friday he is splitting with the country's leftist Democratic Revolution Party, or PRD, citing what he described as its increasing closeness to President Enrique Pena Nieto and the governing Institutional Revolutionary Party.
Mexico's National Human Rights Commission said Thursday it has received a complaint from inmates at a maximum-security prison, reportedly including top cartel leaders, complaining of poor food and bad conditions.
Mexico will send a protest note to the Vatican over purported comments by Pope Francis worrying about a possible "Mexicanization" of his native Argentina due to rising drug trafficking activity there, authorities announced Monday.
A butterfly being considered for federal protection is emblematic of the plight that pollinating insects face in part because farmers, enticed by ethanol mandates, are growing more herbicide-resistant crops, which has stripped millions of acres of crucial plant habitat.

Mexico drug lord captures change but don't lower trafficking

It's another big score for the Mexican government, which has been tearing through its list of most-wanted drug lords in recent years.

Mexico official: Police capture top capo 'La Tuta' Gomez

A Mexican federal official says federal police have captured Servando "La Tuta" Gomez, one of the most-wanted drug lords and who once terrorized western Michoacan state.

Imprisoned Mexican drug suspects complain of poor conditions

Mexico's National Human Rights Commission said Thursday it has received a complaint from inmates at a maximum-security prison, reportedly including top cartel leaders, complaining of poor food and bad conditions.

Detentions of major Mexico drug chiefs in recent years

Recent captures or killings of top Mexican drug cartel leaders:

Mexico to replace embattled attorney general

Mexico's embattled attorney general, Jesus Murillo Karam, is leaving the post to take a new cabinet-level job as head of urban and rural development.

Mexico president in crisis is losing support of big business

The full-page ad in Mexico's national newspapers was unusual, if not unprecedented: 20 powerful business groups and think tanks publicly scolding the government for not doing its job.

Reform would let some foreign agents carry guns in Mexico

President Enrique Pena Nieto on Tuesday proposed a reform that would allow some foreign agents to carry arms inside Mexico, a significant change in a country that has historically said the practice would violate its sovereignty.

A new threat appears along the U.S.-Mexico border: Americans with measles

Mexico urges its citizens to get vaccinated before traveling in the United States after two people carried measles south across the border.

Mexico gillnet ban taking effect to help endangered porpoise

Mexican authorities will use satellite tracking, drones, three naval bases and a fleet of small patrol boats to enforce a new gillnet fishing ban in the upper Sea of Cortes in a bid to save the critically endangered vaquita marina, the world's smallest porpoise.

Popular Mexican singer Ariel Camacho dies in car crash

Ariel Camacho, a young, up-and-coming Mexican singer, was killed in a car crash after leaving a concert in Mexico, his record company confirmed Thursday.

Flights again affected as Mexican volcano spews ash

The Popocatepetl volcano east of Mexico City has been spewing ash into the sky, forcing cancellation of flights at the nearby Puebla International Airport for a second consecutive day.

Police, protesters clash outside Acapulco's airport; 1 dead

A 65-year-old retired teacher died early Wednesday, a day after suffering injuries when riot police cleared away protesters who tried blocking access to the airport in the resort city of Acapulco.

Mexico puts some deep-water oil on hold amid crude's slide

Mexico's state-run oil company is postponing some deep-water exploration projects in response to a steep drop in global crude prices, the company's director said Wednesday.
Slammed by a 70 percent increase in illegal pipeline taps in one year, Mexico's state oil company announced Tuesday that it will no longer ship finished, usable gasoline or diesel through its network of ducts.
Mexican officials said Monday that two worn-out bolts on a gas tanker truck broke, causing a leak that resulted in a hospital explosion that killed five people last month
Protests in the southern state of Guerrero around the disappearance of 43 students have meant regular blockades and attacks and robberies of vehicles delivering everything from milk to snacks in recent months.
The U.S. ambassador to Mexico has condemned attacks on journalists in the country and says it is the government's responsibility to ensure they are protected.
A noted Mexican-American scholar and civil rights advocate whose name graces educational institutions in Texas and California but is virtually unknown in his hometown of Albuquerque is on track to receive the honor from a New Mexico school.

Obama, Mexico's president discuss cartels, border security

© 1996-2010 The Washington Post Company

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

New Details Emerge on Mexican Finance Minister’s Property Deal

Records show government contractor didn’t make profit in sale of house to Luis Videgaray

The Nation

Why Is the US Still Spending Billions to Fund Mexico’s Corrupt Drug War?

LE MONDE

Qui est Hervé Falciani, le cauchemar de HSBC ?

LE MONDE | 09.02.2015  Par Fabrice Lhomme et Gérard Davet

Cet homme-là est un opportuniste, bien plus qu’un être multiple. Hervé Falciani peut certes endosser différents rôles, se complaire dans un langage abscons, pour mieux se cacher, peut-être, mais il a su, surtout, nager en eaux troubles, rebondir à chaque épreuve, profiter de toute possibilité. Il a été successivement informaticien, détrousseur de données sensibles, chevalier blanc, mythomane, manipulateur, lanceur d’alerte, puis victime du système, allez vousretrouver. Mais Hervé Falciani est d’abord, et cela, personne ne peut lui enlever, le pivot de l’incroyable affaire HSBC. Son géniteur. Après cinq années d’enquête, la lecture de milliers d’archives confidentielles, de témoignages inédits, Le Monde peut vous narrer la vraie vie de Falciani, le cauchemar vivant de la banque HSBC Private Bank.

Plus, ICI

HSBC, un écrin sur mesure pour le gotha du diamant

Les très protégés clients mystères de HSBC

« Nous publions les noms des personnalités dont la fraude est manifeste » 53

ICIJ : qui se cache derrière cette machine à scoops ?

© Le Monde.fr

Logo

Friday, February 6, 2015

61 bodies found in abandoned Mexican crematorium

Acapulco (Mexico), Feb 6 (IANS/EFE) A total of 61 bodies have been found at an abandoned crematorium in Acapulco, in the Mexican state of Guerrero, where in September last year 43 students went missing, officials from the public prosecutor's office reported Friday.
The discovery was made after residents from the neighbouring areas called the authorities, who reached the crematorium and recovered the human remains in forensic vehicles, as confirmed by Spanish news agency EFE.
According to the sources, the foul smell from the bodies caught the attention of nearby residents who alerted the authorities Thursday.
Apparently, the crematorium, the Cremaciones El Pacifico, had been abandoned about a year ago.
More, HERE.

Actualités
mardi 27 janvier, Sainte Angèle

Florence Cassez demande 36 millions de dollars au Mexique

Publié le 27/01/2015

International

Florence Cassez, détenue pendant sept ans au Mexique pour enlèvement, séquestration, délinquance organisée et détention d’armes à l’usage exclusif des forces armées, a entamé une action en justice auprès de la Cour suprême mexicaine pour obtenir 36 millions de dollars (environ 32 millions d’euros) de dommages et intérêts.
Selon l’avocat de la jeune femme, Me José Patiño Hurtado invité sur radio MVS, l’action en justice, lancée vendredi 23 janvier, visait l’ex-président mexicain Felipe Calderon (2006-2012), son ancien secrétaire particulier, l’actuel sénateur Roberto Gil, ainsi que les anciens ministres de la Sécurité publique, Genaro Garcia Luna, et de la Justice, Daniel Cabeza de Vaca. « Nous présentons une plainte pour dommage moral envers Florence Cassez, atteinte à ses sentiments, à sa réputation et à son honneur. Ils ont tué sa vie », a déclaré Me José Patiño Hurtado, qui a également estimé que l’ancien président Calderon, comme les autres personnalités visées, « était en charge et n'a pas empêché que soit commis l'illicite » contre Florence Cassez.

Une arrestation mise en scène de la police

L’action vise également la chaîne de télévision Televisa et un de ses présentateurs vedettes, Carlos Loret de Mola. Ils sont accusés d’avoir présenté comme une arrestation en direct une mise en scène de la police.
Plus, ICI

©LaDepeche.fr

REUTERS

Security chief in violent Mexican state steps down

MEXICO CITY Thu Jan 22, 2015
(Reuters) - Mexico's Interior Ministry said on Thursday that a top security official appointed to restore order in a restive western state has stepped down, a few weeks after new outbreaks of violence.
Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong said the federal government's security commissioner for Michoacan state, Alfredo Castillo, would take on a new role in the government, without giving any more details on the reasons for his departure.
Castillo was appointed commissioner a year ago in a bid to crush a powerful drug gang known as the Knights Templar which had taken control of large swathes of Michoacan, and later became embroiled in bloody clashes with vigilante groups.
More, HERE.
Copyright



Mexico removes security envoy from troubled Michoacan

The Associated Press

January 22, 201

MORELIA, Mexico — The federal security commissioner appointed a little over a year ago for the troubled western state of Michoacan confirmed Thursday that he is being withdrawn by Mexico's government.
Security envoy Alfredo Castillo will be replaced by an army general, Felipe Gurrola, who will play a more limited role leading federal security forces in Michoacan, a largely agricultural state known for its limes and avocados but also social unrest and drug gang violence.
In a speech, Castillo gave a chilling description of how completely the pseudo-religious Knights Templar cartel once controlled everything from local police forces to industry, commerce and even everyday chores in what threatened to become a "failed state."
More, HERE.
Copyright

Toronto Sun

Drug gang members ate human hearts: Mexican government

Gabriel Stargardter, Reuters; January 06, 2015 

MEXICO CITY - A vicious Mexican drug gang forced some members to eat the hearts of murder victims as part of a gruesome initiation rite to root out infiltrators, a government security official said on Tuesday, citing witness testimony.
For much of the past year, Michoacan, a mountainous, agricultural state in western Mexico, has been ravaged by fighting between drug gang henchmen and vigilantes who took up arms against the cartels but have since splintered into violent factions.
A mid-December shootout between two rival groups that killed 11 people has reignited fears the government is failing to control the state after flooding it with federal troops and pressing vigilantes into a fledgling rural police force.
More, HERE.
Copyright © 2015 All rights reserved

The Toronto Sun is a member of Canoe Sun Media Urban Newspapers.

Yahoo News

Security on agenda as embattled Mexican president visits Obama

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico's embattled President Enrique Pena Nieto will discuss security and justice with U.S. President Barack Obama in Washington next week amid public anger about how he has handled a probe into the apparent massacre of 43 trainee teachers.

Pena Nieto's standing has been battered by a string of massive street protests following the abduction and likely murder of 43 students by a drug gang working with corrupt police in the southwestern city of Iguala on the night of Sept. 26.

More, HERE.

Yahoo News Network

KREM2

December 31, 2014

VIDEO: Toddler fatally shot Blackfoot, ID mom at Hayden Walmart

Photo of Veronica Rutledge from her Facebook account.
Photo of Veronica Rutledge from her Facebook account. Family members granted KREM 2 permission to use the photo.(Photo: KREM)

HAYDEN, Idaho—A toddler shot and killed a Walmart shopper Tuesday morning in what deputies described as an "accident."

The woman was later identified by authorities said Veronica Rutledge from Blackfoot, Idaho. The father-in-law of Walmart shooting victim spoke with KREM 2 News Tuesday night. He called the shooting "tragic." He added the family "lost a beautiful, loving mother."

Walmart employees evacuated the Hayden store around 10:20 a.m. following the gunshot.
Deputies with the Kootenai County Sheriff's Office responded to the scene and found a 29-year-old woman dead inside the store.

Rutledge was shopping with four kids, when her two-year-old son reached into her purse, accessed her concealed 9mm Smith & Wesson M&P Shield semi-automatic handgun and accidentally discharged the weapon, according deputies. Authorities said the toddler was seated in the shopping cart when the gun was discharged. The woman and children were in the back of the store near the electronics area when the deadly shooting happened.

The bullet struck Mrs. Rutledge in the head, killing her instantly.

More, HERE.

© 2015 KREM, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, Inc.

GLOBAL RESEARCH

NSA and Facebook Work Together

By Kurt Nimmo, March 27, 2015

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Lies and Deceptions on the Left: The Politics of Self Destruction

By Prof. James Petras, March 22, 2015

petras

Over the past year, what appeared as hopeful signs, that Left governments were emerging as powerful alternatives to right-wing pro-US regimes, is turning into a historic rout, which will relegate them to the dustbin of history for many years to come.

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Costa Rican Ambassador Fired for Defending Venezuelan Government Amid Escalating Media War

By Lucas Koerner, March 27, 2015

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Flight 9525 Crash: What’s Religion Got To Do with It? German Co-Pilot as Terrorist

By Juan Cole, March 27, 2015

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George W. Bush: “My Dad Was Meeting with the Brother of Osama on September 11, 2001. Does That Make Him a Terror Suspect?”

By Prof Michel Chossudovsky, March 17, 2015
osama

Ironically, the anti-terrorist legislation does not apply to politicians in high office. Individuals can be arrested but presidents and prime ministers are allowed to mingle and socialize with family members of the World’s most renowned terrorist.

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THE KUALA LUMPUR INITIATIVE TO CRIMINALISE WAR

The Obama administration has embarked upon the ultimate war crime, a Worldwide military adventure, “a long war”, which threatens the future of humanity. The Pentagon’s global military design is one of world conquest.

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1984_270x453

The complete loss of constitutional civil liberties where we can be taken in without warrant, locked up for indefinite periods of time, those totalitarian Orwellian tactics are here today… in secret CIA-like “black site” locations throughout the nation

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Obama’s “Fake War” against the Islamic State (ISIS). The Islamic State is Protected by the US and its Allies

By Prof Michel Chossudovsky, February 19, 2015

ISIS made in USA

Why has the US Air Force not been able to wipe out the Islamic State which at the outset was largely equipped with conventional small arms not to mention state of the art Toyota pickup trucks?
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A Century of American Figurehead Presidents Marching to the Beat of Wall Street and the New World Order

By Joachim Hagopian, February 18, 2015

USA présidents

A chronicle of this last century’s presidents offers us Americans a greater understanding of the diminished role our figurehead presidents have played as a mere public face to the
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Boko Haram texte
The objectives of the US military presence in Africa are well documented: counter Chinese influence and control strategic locations and natural resources including oil reserves. This was confirmed more than 8 years ago by the US State Department
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Canada: Harper Government Relies on Torture Evidence, Say Three Professional Organizations

By Global Research, February 05, 2015 
In the wake of the December, 2014 release of the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee’s report on CIA torture, Prime Minister Harper said the report “has nothing to do whatsoever with the government of Canada.”

However, David Long, 9/11 survivor and creator of a petition submitted to Parliament December 3, 2014, disputes this claim.

The office of Steven Blaney, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, recently rejected this request for a Parliamentary review of the September 11, 2001 attacks.
The 1427 petitioners are dismayed that the key document setting forth the U.S. government’s account of the 9/11 events, the 2004 9/11 Commission Report, is based largely on testimony obtained through torture.
Their case was presented in a widely-viewed press conference held at Parliament December 10th by three academic organizations –  Rethink911.ca,  Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth and the9/11 Consensus Panel,
In his brief response to the petitioners, Mr. Blaney stated:
“The Government will not tolerate the waste of taxpayer dollars by studying conspiracy theories.”
More, HERE.
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Police Murders and the Criminalization of Protest in America

By Andre Damon; Global Research, February 01, 2015

On Friday, New York Police Department Commissioner William J. Bratton announced the formation of a 350-member paramilitary police unit specializing in “disorder control and counter-terrorism.” Bratton made clear the new unit would be used to crack down on political opposition. 

In his announcement, Bratton explicitly equated peaceful protests, protected under the First Amendment of the US constitution, with acts of terrorism and mass murder. The commissioner said the new unit will be “designed for dealing with events like our recent protests, or incidents like Mumbai or what just happened in Paris,” referring to the 2008 Mumbai, India attacks that killed 164 people and the recent shooting of 11 people at the offices of the French weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo 
The police commissioner made clear that members of the unit would be heavily armed. “Long rifles and machine guns… are unfortunately sometimes necessary,” he said. 
The announcement by Bratton, speaking for the Democratic administration of Mayor Bill de Blasio, makes clear that the official response to peaceful protests in Ferguson, Missouri and other cities is not to rein in police violence, but to intensify it, along with a further militarization of the police to deal with the broader social and political unrest to come.

More, HERE.
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MEXICO NEWS

Violence Intensifies in Mexico as Authorities Unearth 10 Headless Bodies

By Jake Dean; Global Research, January 13, 2015

Mexican police have unearthed ten decapitated bodies and eleven heads in unmarked graves Tuesday near the city of Chilapa de Alvarez, 31 miles east of Guerrero state’s capital, Chilpancingo. The bodies were found spread throughout six clandestine graves with their hands tied and showing signs of torture. The heads of the victims were discovered in another grave inside four plastic bags.

Prosecutors have yet to identify the victims and are attempting to find the eleventh body and to ascertain if the heads belong to the corpses found in the graves. An anonymous-tip off alerted the police to the graves. The remains have been taken to the Forensic Medical Service of Chilpancingo for identification.

The brutal methods used against these victims are all too familiar.

More, HERE.
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How Israeli High-Tech Security Firms Are Turning the U.S.-Mexico Border into a “New Kind of Hell”

U.S. borderlands are laboratories for nightmarish innovations.

More, HERE.
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International Court Calls on Mexico to Ban Genetically Modified Corn

By Ethan A. Huff;Global Research, January 16, 2015

Mexico is desperately trying to avoid a bioterrorism takeover by Big GMO, which is insistent upon ushering in genetically modified (GM) maize to replace the dozens of native corn varieties already grown throughout the country. 

The Mexican Chapter of the Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal has issued an urgent plea to the Mexican government to once and for all ban all plantings of GM maize in order to avoid catastrophic losses to the “center of origin and diversity of this staple crop.”

The ruling, which came after the Tribunal spent three years gathering evidence from more than 1,000 organizations on GMO safety and effectiveness, warns that GM maize threatens to contaminate Mexico’s roughly 60 native corn varieties. More than just a staple crop, corn is a cultural treasure of Mexico, and because there is already a natural diversity of it, corn grows exceptionally well without the need for genetic alterations.

More, HERE.
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Obama Backs Beleaguered Mexican President Peña Nieto

“NAFTA-Land Security”: How Canada and Mexico Have Become Part of the U.S. Policing Regime

By Paul Ashby; Global Research, December 04, 2014
National Guard PFC monitors one of dozens of cameras on the border with Mexico at the Border Patrol’s Communications Center in Arizona (U.S. Army / Creative Commons)
During this summer’s child migrant crisis and the accompanying frenzy around “security” along the U.S.-Mexico boundary, a spotlight was shone on Mexico’s role in protecting the U.S. “homeland.” It helped illuminate what Washington considers the United States’ territorial boundaries: those of the countries associated with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In other words, the territories of Canada and Mexico are part of the U.S. policing regime, under a regional security framework we might call “NAFTA-land Security.”
Evidence of this emerged in July when a Congressional hearing featured a discussion on, as Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) put it, “what Mexico is actually doing to help us” regarding the unauthorized movement of Central American children. Some lawmakers and officials hinted that insufficient efforts by Mexican authorities made possible the unwanted migrants’ northward movement through Mexico.
In response, administration officials pointed to Mexican President Peña Nieto’s new southern border strategy, one that, as Todd Miller has written, involves the exportation of the U.S. border policing model to Mexico.
More, HERE.
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More Beheaded Bodies Discovered in Southern Mexico

Disappeared Students in Mexico: Global Struggle for Ayotzinapa Captures World’s Attention

By Telesur Global Research, November 22, 2014
More than 200 actions were carried out Thursday, coinciding with Mexico’s Day of Revolution.

A student’s skin was peeled over his head in a gruesome and clear display of a narco-state murder. The photo of the murder, which took place in the drug war-torn state of Guerrero some seven weeks ago, quickly went viral on the Internet. On the same day, five other people were killed and some 43 more students went “missing” in the small town of Ayotzinapa. In a press conference addressing the abuses more than one month after the disappearance of the students, who hailed from a rural-based and selective teachers college in Guerrero, an Attorney General presumed them “dead” without presenting any evidence to substantiate his conclusion. The nation’s leading prosecutor said he was “tired” by the end of the press conference, much to the chagrin of those who sympathized with the plight of the parents of the disappeared students.

Those happenings have served as the sparks that have ignited the nation’s ire to a feverish boiling point in one of the largest countries and economies of Latin America. Mexico has witnessed near daily and nation-wide actions of resistance. Since the disappearance of the “normalistas” (students training to be teachers) on September 26, the country has been brimming with mass marches, candle-light vigils, university-campus and labor-union-led strikes, occupations of official and university buildings, riot police-led arrests of demonstrators, property destruction of official buildings, sit-ins, panels ruminating over the ills of narco-state violence and international bridge closings.

While the 43 students, who are technically still missing due to the lack of any corpses being forensically tied to the students, were what clearly catalyzed the movement’s inception, much of the country has long been weary of the systematic problem of disappearances and the eery official impunity which has often surrounded them. Nothing less than some 24,000 disappearances, over the course of the last three years alone, account for official estimates. Other analysts estimate the actual total as being far higher than that.

The Mayor of Iguala and his wife, dubbed as the “imperial couple,” were arrested several weeks ago, as teleSUR previously reported. At the time of their arrest, speculation was that their detention may produce valuable clues that could help solve the case of the disappeared students. However, no significant advances have been made in the case since the detention of the couple. At the time of their arrest, the on-the-run couple were fugitives from the law and in hiding when authorities busted them at a rented home in Itzapalapa, Mexico City.

More, HERE.

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Angry Protests Sweep Mexico after Government Says Missing Students are Dead


Global Research, November 11, 2014
Angry protests swept Mexico over the weekend in the wake of a press conference Friday in which Jesús Murillo Karam, the country’s attorney general, declared that 43 missing teaching students from the Ayotzinapa Normal School in the state of Guerrero are all dead. Murrillo based this evaluation on confessions by gang members that   they had killed the students, who were handed over to them by the police, and then burned their bodies.
Demonstrations in both Mexico City and the Guerrero capital of Chilpancingo saw clashes with police and attacks on government buildings. In the capital, a small group of demonstrators launched an attack on the historic National Palace in the city’s main square (El Zócalo). They first used metal security barriers to ram the building’s wooden door and then doused it with gasoline and set it on fire.
Some demonstrators questioned why it took police so long to respond to these acts, suggesting that they could have been the work of provocateurs.

More, HERE.

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More than 100,000 March in Mexico City over Disappeared Students

By Rafael Azul; Global Research, November 07, 2014

A mass protest march of more than 100,000 students, teachers, education workers and ordinary citizens took place in Mexico City on Wednesday, November 5, in solidarity with the 43 missing teaching students, normalistas, of the Ayotzinapa Normal School, who have been missing for over 40 days.

This was the third mass demonstration and by far the largest and angriest. Many of the participants directed their anger at President Enrique Peña Nieto, demanding that he resign. One protest sign denounced him “for corruption, betraying the nation, ineptitude,” calling him a “repressor and assassin.”
Others carried signs that said, “It was the State.” Leading the march were students from Mexico City’s National Autonomous Metropolitan University (UNAM), the Polytechnic Institute, rural teaching colleges, and Iberian-American University, who all had joined a massive nationwide 72-hour student strike.

At Mexico City’s Constitution Square (the Zócalo), many thousands greeted the protesters as they arrived after the two-and-a-half-hour march from the president’s mansion (Los Pinos). At the mass rally, family members of the 43 disappeared students spoke to the demonstrators. None of the major political parties (the governing PRI, the PAN, the PRD, the Greens) were involved in the protest.

More, HERE.
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Mexico Disarms Local Police in Missing Students’ City

By Press TV,Global Research, October 07, 2014
Mexican federal forces have disarmed the entire police department in the southern city of Iguala after its officers were accused of collaborating with a gang behind the recent disappearance of 43 students.
On Monday, the government’s new federal police unit took over security in Iguala, located some 200 kilometers (125 miles) south of the capital, Mexico City.

The federal unit was tasked with holding order in the city and helping search for the students who went missing last month after a deadly police shooting.

The deployment in the southern violence-stricken state of Guerrero came after President Enrique Pena Nieto vowed to establish justice and bring an end to corruption in the country.

Pena Nieto said he had dispatched the federal forces to Iguala to “find out what happened and apply the full extent of the law to those responsible.”The decision to disarm Iguala’s police corps came just days after 28 charred bodies were found in a mass grave on the outskirts of the city.

State prosecutor Inaky Blanco has said the recovered bodies probably belonged to the missing students. State officials also say it will take up to two weeks to receive the results of DNA tests to identify the corpses.

The students, all trainee teachers, went missing following a police attack on September 26 against a protest over   teachers’ rights.

According to Blanco, state investigators have obtained video footage showing local police arresting a number of   students during the clashes and taking them away.

Prosecutors said the Guerreros Unidos drug gang also participated in the police shooting that left six people dead and 25 others wounded.

Mexican authorities have already arrested 22 officers and issued arrest warrants for Iguala mayor Jose Luis Albarca and his security chief over the deadly incident.

More, HERE.
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Militarization and Political Crisis in Mexico

Is Mexico a Narco-State?

By Michael Werbowski;Global Research, May 31, 2010

Mexico - In the wake of Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s recent state visit to the U.S and Canada, a burning question remains without any clear answer.

2010 is historically significant for Mexico. It is its bi-centennial year of independence ( in 1810 the country began to break free from Spanish imperial tutelage) and perhaps more significantly is is also the centenary year of the 1910 Mexican revolution. There is little to celebrate though. The country this year, is still reeling from the vortex of drug-trafficking crimes, the global economic down-turn and the fall-out from the histrionics and panic induced by the H1N1-Swine flu “pandemic” of 2009.

Mexico after a decade of the centre-right almost “corporatist” PAN ( National Action Party) party’s rule, ( as in 2000, the first PAN candidate won the presidency, Vincente Fox) has been practically “Balkanised”. And as a result, it is now faced with a crippling fragmentation of the federation itself, due mainly to territorial battles or “turf wars” going on between rival drug cartels, which operate almost with impunity in many Mexican states. Possibly, the most fascinating and insightful read on this phenomenal topic is: Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State? . While I was pondering over the question raised by the book’s title , I was somewhat astonished to read in (despite what I witnessed first hand in Mexico) the concluding chapter, a rather reassuring reply. That basically, Mexico is far from becoming another Somalia, Pakistan or Haiti.

More, HERE.
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Destabilizing Mexico

By Rev. Richard Skaff; Global Research, March 13, 2009

Attorney General Eric Holder stated on February 25, 2009 that Mexican drug cartels pose a national security threat, and issued a direct warning to these cartels that they will be destroyed.

The warning came as the attorney general and acting Drug Enforcement Administration chief Michele Leonhart announced the completion of the final phase of DEA’s “Operation Xcellerator,” which targeted the Sinaloa cartel, a major western Mexico drug operation that has been expanding its reach into the United States . [1].

Meanwhile, the blood shed in the Mexican cities continues to be extensive and has expanded its tentacles of violence to various cities in Mexico. Lawlessness, corruption, murders, decapitations, and kidnappings have taken the Mexican cities by a storm, giving rise to a new radical group calling itself the Juarez Citizens Command that is threatening to strike back against lawlessness that has gripped Mexico for a long time. The group stated that they are going to strike back by killing one criminal a day until order and peace is restored. Similar groups are popping up all across Mexico. [2].

In its last report, the US Department of justice disclosed that 17.2 billion dollars in cash entered Mexico in only the past two years as a result of money laundering operation in their country. The report advised that Mexico and Colombia are the principal destinations of narco resources that operate in the US and that “the laundering of drug money is a global industry” with transnational organizations present in various countries. [2].

According to a DEA undercover operative, the Mexican drug cartels have gained more and more of the American market. They have grown bolder in their attempts to expand their operations in Mexico and the United States . They now control the ruling party in Mexico and operate the biggest drug business on earth right here in the USA . [2].

Mexico’s drug and violence problem now engulfs the entire country, inundating cities along the U.S.-Mexico border. The robust drug cartel reduced its position in the western mountains, and lunged into the heart of national power in Mexico City. The capital that was once relatively immune to such contemptuous boldness of drug killings has become the scene of multiple assassinations of high-ranking federal police officials in about a week. More than 1,000 people have been killed in Mexico this year in drug-related violence and about 6,290 in 2008. [11].

More, HERE.
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MORE MEXICO ARTICLES, BY GLOBAL RESEARCH, HERE

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I N T E R N A T I O N A L

“Je Suis CIA” By Larry Chin, January 17, 2015
cia
Since 9/11, the imperial playbook has consisted of time-tested tactic: the false flag operation. Carry out or facilitate a spectacular atrocity. Blame it on the enemy of choice. Issue a lie-infested official narrative, and have the corporate media repeat the lie. Rile up militant crowds, stoke the hatred, wage war with the public stamp of approval.

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Ali awakes armless
Massive terrorist attacks were hatched back soon after the pretext of cinematographic ‘terrorist’ attacks in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001. The people of Afghanistan were first in line, that winter bombing and invasion had been planned for some months before smoke billowed up from the Twin Towers.

Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies, Spring 2014

MEXICO: Center for Latin American Studies, University of California, Berkeley

Communities Up in Arms

Lorena Ojeda

 

The emergence of armed self-defense groups in the state of Michoacán has catapulted the region to the top of the Mexican federal government’s list of security concerns. Not all of these groups are alike, however. While the indigenous P’urhépecha community guards and the mestizo self-defense groups share many common grievances, they have arisen in response to different histories and different contemporary circumstances.

Concentrated in central and northwestern Michoacán, the P’urhépecha home area is divided into four sub-regions: the Sierra P’urhépecha; the Lake Pátzcuaro basin; the Ciénega de Zacapu; and the Cañada de los Once Pueblos. Disputes about land ownership and access to natural resources have long made the region a hot spot for both intra- and inter-community violence. Although agrarian conflicts in the region date back to the colonial era, they were exacerbated by the agrarian reform initiatives following the Mexican Revolution, in large part because the distribution of lands to one community almost always impacted the interests of its neighbors. The reforms resulted in bloody clashes that sowed distrust between the communities. To further complicate matters, this infighting made it easier for outside interest groups to gain a foothold in the area. Revolutionary and post-revolutionary bandits devastated indigenous villages, taking advantage of their divisions.  It was from this complex stew of conflicts that the community guards emerged.

More, HERE.

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The Berkeley Blog

Not everyone mourns for Ayotzinapa’s students

Forty-three student teachers (normalistas) disappeared on the evening of September 26 in the municipality of Iguala, in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero. The incident has attracted national and international attention, and it has also generated a wealth of speculation and misinformation. The daily reports concerning the discovery of numerous mass graves have further muddied the waters; the only silver lining, such as it is, in these reports is that the missingnormalistas do not appear to have been buried in any of the discovered grave sites. The contrast between the hope that the normalistas might still be alive, and the despair of living in a country where mass graves can seemingly be uncovered by simply kicking over a few stones, is striking.

But perhaps the most depressing aspect of this story is the indifference of some Mexicans that have even attempted to argue that the normalistas somehow deserved their fate because of their “rebellious attitudes” or their “delinquent” appearance. Thus, a society already divided by social class, skin color, linguistic differences, clothing styles, the size of one’s bank account, zip codes, and a host of other frivolous matters has found new ways of demarcating distinct types of Mexicans: “good” versus “bad”; those that receive justice versus those that do not; and those that can versus those that do not even deserve to try.

Meanwhile, Mexico’s political parties are only interested in representing and advancing their own interests. The left has lost its identity in its efforts to reach power. The right, which is more concerned with maintaining the appearance of good behavior, has shrouded itself in silence and indifference. And the ruling party’s principal preoccupation is the next election cycle and the perpetuation of its political dynasty, not the needs of Mexico’s citizens.

The Ayotzinapa case reveals the deterioration of Mexico’s political and social spheres. The missing normalistas are poor, indigenous or mestizo (mixed-race), and brown-skinned. Their hair is straight, they are not particularly tall, and they speak with the accents of the countryside. Simply put, they are Mexicans. But their surnames – Tizapa, Jacinto, Patolzin, Ascencio, Tlatempa, and Lauro, among others – are not among Mexico’s famous, and they are more likely to be found in the country’s seemingly infinite number of mass graves, as opposed to a social club or the halls of the stock market. The divide between Mexicans has become so great that some are not even moved by the heartrending pain experienced by the parents whose sons are missing.

The Ayotzinapa case has quickly become symbolic of the daily disappearances and murders that occur in Mexico, and of the mass graves that vastly outnumber the number of roads, hospitals, universities, and science and technology centers that have been built in recent years.

Throughout the world, many are pressuring the Mexican government to resolve the matter and bring those responsible to justice. Hundreds of thousands of Mexicans have taken to the streets demanding that the normalistas be found, while also calling out the shamelessness of the governments, political parties, and dominant social classes that allowed the disappearances to occur. But there are millions of Mexicans, and the majority of them appear to have been stunned into silence by the Mexican apocalypse, or have chosen to express their outrage safely behind closed doors.

COMMENTS

NOTE: Professor Lorena Ojeda authorized Security Corner in Mexico to republish this article. She is a visiting scholar in the Department of History at UC Berkeley and a professor of history at Mexico's Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo. Her work at Berkeley is supported by the Fulbright García-Robles and CONACYT grants. Ojeda recently published the article "Communities Up in Arms," on the emergence of armed self-defense groups in the state of Michoacán, in the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies.
ed.

NPR

By Eyder Peralta; February 03, 2015

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto is asking a government watchdog agency to look into the purchase of homes by himself, his wife, and his finance minister from contractors who were then awarded lucrative construction projects by the government.
Critics have charged that the Peña Nieto government faced conflicts of interest because of the transactions. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports Peña Nieto also announced anti-corruption initiatives.
She filed this report for our Newscast unit:
"Peña Nieto announced the investigation and new transparency measures for federal officials, including asset reporting requirements. Taking no questions from reporters, Peña Nieto said he had done nothing wrong.
"'I am conscious that the events generated the appearance of something improper...something that in reality did not occur," the president said.
"Press reports revealed the first lady bought a luxury home from a well connected contractor who was part of a group that won a multi-billion dollar transportation contract. The president and finance minister also purchased homes from government contractors."
As we've reported, back in 2012, Peña Nieto's wife, the telenovela star Angélica Rivera, bought a home valued at $7 million from a contractor who was then included in a $3.7 billion contract to build a high speed train.
Under political pressure, Rivera sold the house and said she had done nothing wrong.
More, HERE.
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December 26, 2014, Scott Neuman NPR's Carrie Kahn reports that the body of a kidnapped Catholic priest has been discovered after he was seized in the southern state of Guerrero earlier this week.
The body of Rev. Gregorio Lopez Gorostieta was found with a gunshot wound to the head, not far from the seminary where he lived near Ciudad Altamirano. Carrie says he is the third priest this year to be killed in Guerrero, where 43 students were kidnapped by corrupt police and presumably murdered by drug traffickers. Gorostieta is the first, however, to have been seized since the students disappeared in September.
More, HERE.
More MEXICO stories by NPR, HERE.

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November 19, 2014

Eyder Peralta

Amid rumblings about conflict of interest and corruption, Mexico's first lady says she will sell a multimillion-dollar home in one of the most glamorous areas of Mexico City.

In a YouTube video released late Tuesday, Angélica Rivera defiantly proclaims that she has "nothing to hide."
"I have worked all my life, and because of that I am an independent woman capable of building a patrimony with honesty," she said.
Rivera and her husband, President Enrique Peña Nieto, have been under heavy scrutiny lately: first, because of the way the government has handled the case of 43 students who went missing after they were detained by police, and then after Aristegui Noticias revealed that an opulent modern structure dubbed "The White House" and valued at $7 million was owned by a construction company awarded millions in government contracts.
As Aristegui explained, the house, which Rivera showed off in a glitzy spread in the royal-centric magazine ¡Hola!, was just another symbol of the "close relationship between Peña Nieto and Grupo Higa."
According to the investigation, Grupo Higa is owned by Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantú, who in the past rented out airplanes for the Peña Nieto's 2012 presidential campaign. The company, Aristegui reports, received millions  of dollars in contracts in the state of Mexico when Peña Nieto was governor.
Once Peña Nieto was in the presidential palace, a subsidiary of Hinojosa's company was awarded part of a huge contract to build a high-speed train from Mexico City to Querétaro.
Just days before the report was published, Peña Nieto canceled the $3.7 billion contract.
More, HERE.

© 2014 NPR

Business Monitor International

Industry Forecast - Mexico Offers Strongest Banking Sector Growth Potential - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Latin America / Economy

Slowing economic activity will temper asset and loan growth in several Latin American economies throughout our five-year forecast period. In contrast, we see stronger banking sector growth prospect...

Read article
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Risk Summary - Mexico - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Mexico / Economy

Mexico's Short-Term Political Risk Rating (STPRR) remains unchanged from last month at 63.5, ranking 8th out of 17 Latin American countries scored, and 12.3 points below regional leader Chile. Mexi...

Read article
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Political Risk Analysis - Ruling PRI To Lose Support In Midterms Due To Iguala Crisis - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Mexico / Economy

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto's approval rating will continue to fall in the coming months, as the disappearance of 43 students in Iguala heightens concerns over security and corruption. This will have negative implications for the ruling Partido Institucional Revolucionario in the June 2015 mid-term elections, increasing the odds of a strong result by the main centre-right opposi...

READ FULL ARTICLE
© 2015 Business Monitor International

Al Jazeera America

Crude harvest: Selling Mexico's oil

VIDEO: Mexico may be hitting the perfect storm when it opens its energy resources to foreign investors.

30 Dec 2014
Against the backdrop of Mexico's ever-widening gap between rich and poor, growing violence, and stalled economy, President Enrique Pena Nieto has passed a series of economic reforms.
Under these reforms, Mexico's oil, which was expropriated from foreign interests 75 years ago, is now for sale to private, international companies.
Twenty years ago, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which opened Mexico up to trade with the US and Canada, led to the collapse of agriculture, and paved the way to the privatization of oil.
The operations of Mexico's state-owned oil company, Pemex, have never been entirely transparent, and communities have been crippled by oil disasters. For instance, in October 2013, the state of Tabasco experienced its worst oil disaster when a drill site exploded and burned for 55 days, contaminating the surrounding land and water. Villagers closest to the site say they are suffering from health problems and have lost their livestock. They say Pemex has never accepted responsibility for the accident, nor has it offered any compensation.
More, HERE.
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OPINION: Privatising Mexico's oil industry spells disaster

In the absence of strong state institutions, the privatisation of Mexico's oil industry will be disastrous.

30 Dec 2014, By

Edgardo Buscaglia is a Senior Law and Economics Scholar at Columbia University in New York and President of the Instituto de Accion Ciudadana in Mexico.

Who can deny that Mexico is one of the most admired cradles of civilisation, with its culture and history considered an integral part of the world's historical heritage. Yet, Mexico is also a country whose population for centuries has been raped by corrupt authoritarian governments; it is a country which has suffered domestic and regional conflicts leading to foreign interventions backing extractive business interests.
The 1910 Mexican Revolution brought together various groups calling for social justice. It was a natural reaction to centuries of foreign looting of Mexico's resources. One of the consequences of the Revolution was the decision by the
Mexican government to nationalise the immense reserves of oil in the 1930s.
However, it seems that Mexican politicians today have failed to learn a lesson from history. The administration of Mexican President Pena Nieto recently approved legal reforms which will make it possible once again for private firms to become the major players in the Mexican oil business.
More, HERE.

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Who's making money off the War on Drugs?

Disappearance of 43 students from Mexico spurred a national debate about the winners and losers in war on drugs.

Since the disappearance of 43 students from #Ayotzinapa school in Guerrero, Mexico, people around the world have taken to the streets to demand an end to drug-related crime and the close ties between drug cartels, police and political institutions. So if everybody's losing, who's winning?

The rebel spirit driving Mexico’s protests has deep roots

Analysis: Outrage over case of 43 missing students has helped unleash widespread discontent with a deep historical echo

Protests over missing students spread in Mexico

A chronology of the disappearance of 43 students from a teachers’ college in Mexico and its aftermath

Mexico’s church calls for government to change response to violence

Cardinal Norberto Rivera Carrera calls changes ‘necessary,’ says pope is monitoring case of 43 missing students

Cuba-US thaw is a win for Latin America

Analysis: Return of US-Cuban diplomatic relations will affect entire region and possibly isolate Venezuela

Latin America celebrates new US-Cuba era

Chile’s minister of foreign relations calls the Obama and Castro speeches the beginning of the end of the Cold War

VIDEO: Mexico's Nieto faces growing calls to resign

02 Dec 2014

President's second anniversary in office marred by protests as he and the government are accused of corruption.

With help from the Obama administration, Peña Nieto is brutally reshaping Mexican society

Through the story of one immigrant family, we explore the evolution of racism and migration in the US.

President Pena Nieto proposes changes to police force following uproar over presumed massacre of 43 students.
Ferguson: Lawmakers urge calm, offer few policy prescriptions

Analysis: Think riots have never caused change in America? Think again

Brown's parents vow to 'keep fighting' for justice

Protesters upset by Ferguson decision storm St. Louis City Hall

Confronting race and inequality in the US
Week before verdict, 12 killed by US law enforcement

Please click on HERE to get updated Al Jazeera, Mexico news

Drug trafficking organizations are rapidly splintering, but there€’s no end in sight to the violence

Topics:

Mexico

Drugs

Drug Cartels
The village warriors of Guerrero

Cocaine, heroin and avocados


Tens of thousands of people angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students are marching in Mexico City as part of another day of nationwide protests.

Protesters on Thursday waved blackened flags of Mexico and many chanted for the resignation of President Enrique Pena Nieto. "He will fall, he will fall, Pena Nieto will fall," they chanted.

Some protesters clashed with riot police near the city's international airport at the start of the day's demonstrations, burning tyres, throwing firebombs and launching firecrackers at police.
Thursday’s protest was the latest protest over the government's handling of a crime that has infuriated Mexicans fed up with corruption, impunity and a drug war that has left more than 100,000 people dead or missing since 2006.

The case has turned into the biggest challenge of Pena Nieto's nearly two-year-old presidency, on top of another scandal over a mansion his wife bought from a government contractor.
'Mexico is hurting'

The crisis erupted after the mayor of the city of Iguala allegedly ordered police to confront students on September 26, sparking a night of violence that left six people dead and 43 missing, authorities say.
Protesters angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students take to the streets for another day of demonstrations.

More, HERE.

Police officer fires on Mexico City students, inflaming tensions

Students had been planning for a Nov. 20 national strike in solidarity with 43 missing students from Guerrero

INSIDE STORY

VIDEO: Missing Mexico students: Who is responsible.

Protesters demand justice for missing 43 trainee teachers who are feared murdered in Mexico. To watch video click on HERE.
Mexico president pushes trade ties in China while protests rage at home

Peña Nieto's Beijing trip amid massive political crisis at home shows heavy bet on China ties as economic boost

Mexico missing student protesters burn state buildings

Protest movement has hit Guerrero'€™s tourism industry with vacationers canceling trips during busiest time of year.

Photos: In Acapulco, an angry demonstration over missing students

Students, peasants and others attempt to block the airport and clash with police.

Mexico leader travels to Asia amid rising unrest over missing students

Peña Nieto faces increased calls to resign as another presidential scandal emerged over the weekend

Mexico protesters set fire to National Palace over missing students

Gang members have confessed to killing the 43 missing students and dumping their charred remains in a landfill.

Gang members confess to mass killing of Mexico students

Charred human remains found in a dumpster are likely the students who disappeared on Sept. 26, Mexican authorities say.

Mexican army accepts criticism of human rights commission in killings

The defense department says, however, it doesn't agree with all findings of human rights commission on the June slayings.

Why have the most recent kidnappings in Mexico sparked such outrage?

The disappearance of 43 students in Mexico has triggered nationwide demonstrations for government accountability.

Thousands protest missing Mexico students despite mayor arrest

Public anger over student disappearances brings Mexico City to a standstill; full-blown crisis for President Peña Nieto.

Photos: Protests over 43 Guerrero students target government buildings

A city congress and buildings tied to the ruling party are trashed and burned.

The food producer has developed more than 480 varieties of wheat, upping production by an estimated 200 million tonnes.
Mexican official: CIA 'manages' drug trade

Spokesman for Chihuahua state says US agencies don't want to end drug trade, a claim denied by other Mexican officials

24 Jul 2012, by Chris Arsenault

Juarez, Mexico - The US Central Intelligence Agency and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers", a spokesman for the Chihuahua state government in northern Mexico has told Al Jazeera, instead "they try to manage the drug trade".
Allegations about official complicity in the drug business are nothing new when they come from activists, professors, campaigners or even former officials. However, an official spokesman for the authorities in one of Mexico's most violent states - one which directly borders Texas - going on the record with such accusations is unique.

"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva, the Chihuahua spokesman, told Al Jazeera last month at his office in Juarez. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."

Accusations are 'baloney'

Villanueva is not a high ranking official and his views do not represent Mexico's foreign policy establishment. Other more senior officials in Chihuahua State, including the mayor of Juarez, dismissed the claims as "baloney".

"I think the CIA and DEA [US Drug Enforcement Agency] are on the same side as us in fighting drug gangs," Hector Murguia, the mayor of Juarez, told Al Jazeera during an interview inside his SUV. "We have excellent collaboration with the US."

Under the Merida Initiative, the US Congress has approved more than $1.4bn in drug war aid for Mexico, providing attack helicopters, weapons and training for police and judges.

More than 55,000 people have died in drug related violence in Mexico since December 2006. Privately, residents and officials across Mexico's political spectrum often blame the lethal cocktail of US drug consumption and the flow of high-powered weapons smuggled south of the border for causing much of the carnage.

"The war on drugs is an illusion," Hugo Almada Mireles, professor at the Autonomous University of Juarez and author of several books, told Al Jazeera. "It's a reason to intervene in Latin America."

"The CIA wants to control the population; they don't want to stop arms trafficking to Mexico, look at [Operation] Fast and Furious,” he said, referencing a botched US exercise where automatic weapons were sold to criminals in the hope that security forces could trace where the guns ended up.
The Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms lost track of 1,700 guns as part of the operation, including an AK-47 used in 2010 the murder of Brian Terry, a Customs and Border Protection Agent.

More, HERE.

© 2014 Al Jazeera America, LLC. All rights reserved.

InSight Crime

InSight Crime is a foundation dedicated to the study of the principal threat to national and citizen security in Latin America and the Caribbean: organized crime. We seek to deepen and inform the debate about organized crime in the Americas by providing the general public with regular reporting, analysis and investigation on the subject and on state efforts to combat it. More about Insight Crime HERE.
Iguala Massacre: Mexico's PR Message Goes Up in Flames

The stunning, dramatic blow-by-blow account of what most likely happened to the 43 missing students in Guerrero is an indication of just how desperately Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto and his team are trying to perform damage control on a terrifying story -- one that has not only unsettled his government, but has pushed them to admit that things are not as their public relations machine would have you believe.
In the hour-long November 7 press conference (see video below), Attorney General Jose Murillo Karam announced that the recent capture of alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos led to confessions that the students were taken by police while en route to the town of Iguala. The police handed the students over to the Guerreros Unidos, who then killed them and burned their remains.
Specifically, video testimonies from three recently captured “masterminds” of the attacks revealed that the students were carted like cattle to a landfill in Cocula. According to one suspect, approximately 15 students asphyxiated on the way to the dump site. The remaining students were interrogated by members of the Guerreros Unidos before being shot and killed. The bodies were then thrown into the landfill, arranged in a circle, covered in sticks, gasoline, and diesel, and burned. The fire reportedly lasted for 14 hours, from midnight on September 27, until mid-afternoon.
According to the testimonies, a leader of the criminal group known as “El Terco” ordered the burned human remains to be collected and placed into eight black plastic bags. Members of the Guerreros Unidos then took the bags to the San Juan River in Cocula, where they dumped the contents into the water, while two bags were thrown directly into the river.
Following the confessions, search teams found black bags, one of which was still closed. Mexican and Argentine forensic teams reportedly confirmed the bag contained human remains. However, due to the degree to  which the bodies were burned, forensic experts have not yet determined when the remains will be able to be identified.

More, HERE.

Home

Tech Execs Raising Eyebrows Over Washington State’s Cannabis-Tracking Pact

Concerns Center on Transparency, Open Competition and Federal Scrutiny

By Bill Conroy, Via The Narcosphere

February 16, 2015

Concerns Center on Transparency, Open Competition and Federal Scrutiny

The emerging cannabis industry in Washington is tied at the hip to the state’s burgeoning technology sector in no small measure because robust product-tracking data serves as a shield against federal pre-emption of the great marijuana-legalization experiment now underway.

That’s why a little-noticed flap within the state’s tech community is worth paying attention to as regulators in the state continue to roll out the infrastructure to support legal weed — approved by Washington voters in November 2012 through a referendum dubbed Initiative 502.

More, HERE.

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A Battle Has Erupted Over Washington’s Legal Cannabis Plazas

By Bill Conroy - December 18, 2014 at 8:08 pm
The Outcome Could Help Define A Path To A Peaceful End To the Drug War
A major turf war has erupted in the grand experiment to legalize marijuana in the state of Washington.
However, this battle is being waged with the tools of politics, the courts and organizing, unlike the drug war, where disputes over control of the drug plazas, or markets, normally are settled with bullets.
The stakes are high in this turf dispute in Washington, with hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue on the table and the future of a nascent cannabis industry hanging in the balance.

More, HERE.
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Torture Report Reveals CIA’s Manipulation of US Media

By Bill Conroy - December 12, 2014
Agency Used Classified Information As Currency For Deception
The recently released Senate Select Committee on Intelligence report pillorying the CIA’s Bush-era detention and interrogation program is replete with lurid details of what would commonly be called torture, if those practices were carried out on you or me.
Waterboarding, rectal feeding, sleep deprivation, coffin-size cells and forcing detainees to stand in stress positions, even with broken bones, is the stuff of a horror movie. But there is another revelation in the long-awaited, and controversial, Senate committee report that so far seems to have slipped past much examination in the public spotlight.

More, HERE.
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US Military’s Training of Mexican Security Forces Continues As Human-Rights Abuses Mount In Mexico

Posted by Bill Conroy - December 3, 2014

DoD Officials Claim Training is Part of the Solution, Not the Problem

The U.S. government has spent more than $62 million since fiscal year 2010 providing highly specialized training to Mexican security forces, including some $16.3 million in fiscal 2013, as part of an effort to help Mexico better prosecute its war on drugs, records made public under the U.S. Foreign Assistance Act show.

Local Opposition to Washington’s Legal Marijuana Businesses Is a Taxing Issue For the Fledgling Industry

Posted by Bill Conroy - November 14, 2014
Effort to Overcome City Moratoriums on Cannabis Shops Could Spark an Unlikely Alliance
The great experiment in the state of Washington to legalize the sale of marijuana through a regulated and taxed market has hit a hitch at the local level that threatens to slow progress to a snail’s pace, even as more and more marijuana businesses obtain the state licensing needed to open their doors.
Through early November, Washington’s cannabis market, state records show, included some 63 retailers, 239 producers and 197 processors — all issued the required state-level licenses to begin doing business in the state. But the battle ahead for many of them — and others in the pipeline — to actually open their doors for business is far from over.

More, HERE.
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Labor Unions Are Supporting Washington State Legal Marijuana Dispensaries that Create "More Workers to Organize"

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 22, 2014
The United Food and Commercial Workers and other Unions Seek to Strengthen Protections for Cannabis Workers
What’s going on in the state of Washington and beyond with the movement to legalize marijuana is, only in part, about business, taxes and government oversight — all to be amplified by the billions of dollars annually this new industry promises to throw off.

More, HERE.
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Community Police in Guerrero’s Costa Chica Region to Celebrate 19 Years of a Better Way to Combat Crime and Corruption

The Same Southern Mexican State Where 43 Students Were Disappeared Is also Home to a Grassroots Movement that Shows How People Can Police Themselves When the State Becomes Criminal.

By Greg Berger and Oscar Olivera

Special for The Narco News Bulletin

November 7, 2014

Publisher’s Note: In Mexico and throughout the world the state of Guerrero has become a vivid example of the horrors of the “war on drugs” and the pervasive corruption and violence it invites from all levels of government. On September 26, Mayor Jose Luis Abarca of the city of Iguala ordered police to detain a group of students from the local Ayotzinapa teachers’ college. The mayor’s ties to organized crime have been widely documented. It is believed that the mayor thought the students were planning to stage a protest at a public event held by his wife. Police then killed six students, and 43 more were disappeared. The police reportedly turned the 43 youths over to a local criminal gang. Multiple mass graves have been dug up in the area, each at first rumored to contain the bodies of the students, then have been revealed to be the tombs of previous nameless casualties of the US-imposed drug war.
The whereabouts of the missing students are still unknown.
More, HERE.
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Millions Missing From DEA Money-Laundering Operation

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 6, 2014

But No One With the Power to Investigate Seems to Care
At least $20 million went missing from money seizures by law enforcers, critical evidence was destroyed by a federal agency, a key informant was outed by a US prosecutor — contributing to her being kidnapped and nearly killed — and at the end of the day not a single narco-trafficker was prosecuted in this four-year-long DEA undercover operation gone awry.
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Charles Bowden has died, but his voice is louder than ever

Posted by Bill Conroy - September 2, 2014

As one of the original authentic journalists, he trailblazed a path for others to follow
When I heard that he had passed, my eyes welled with tears. I’m of stoic Irish stock, so I don’t shed tears easily, but the news of Charles Bowden’s death (1945-2014) was not an easy thing to bear. He had been a mentor and a friend to me for a decade, and his leaving hurts.
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Posted by Bill Conroy - May 7, 2014
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U.S. Military: More Counter-Narcotics Funding Will Help Stem Exodus of Children from Central America

By Bill Conroy - July 29, 2014

 

Critics Argue Drug-War Money is Part of the Problem, Not the Solution.

 

Some 58,000 migrant children, mostly Central Americans, have made the treacherous journey to the U.S. southern border alone over the past 10 months, but actions being considered by U.S. officials to combat the problem with more military and drug-war aid to their countries, critics warn, may worsen the violence that provokes this unprecedented exodus.

 

The number of unaccompanied children that have arrived at the U.S. border so far this fiscal year is up 106 percent from the same period a year earlier — with the total expected to reach 90,000 before Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year.


To put that latter number in perspective, it is nearly five times larger than the number of Border Patrol agents now stationed along the entire southern border.

More, HERE.
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MORE NARCO NEWS, HERE

25 Deadliest Mass Shootings in U.S. History Fast Facts

By CNN Library; September 2, 2014
(CNN) -- Here is a list of the 25 deadliest single day mass shootings in U.S. history from 1949 to the present. If the shooter was killed or committed suicide during the incident that death is not included in the total.

Timeline:

32 killed - April 16, 2007 - Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. A gunman, 23-year-old student Seung-Hui Cho, goes on a shooting spree killing 32 people in two locations and wounds an undetermined number of others on campus. The shooter, Seung-Hui Cho then committed suicide.

27 killed - December 14, 2012 - Sandy Hook Elementary School - Newtown, Connecticut. Adam Lanza, 20, guns down 20 children, ages 6 and 7, and six adults, school staff and faculty, before turning the gun on himself. Investigating police later find Nancy Lanza, Adam's mother, dead from a gunshot wound. The final count is 28 dead, including the shooter.

23 killed - October 16, 1991 - In Killeen, Texas, 35-year-old George Hennard crashes his pickup truck through the wall of a Lubys Cafeteria. After exiting the truck, Hennard shoots and kills 23 people. He then commits suicide.

21 killed - July 18, 1984 - In San Ysidro, California, 41-year-old James Huberty, armed with a long-barreled Uzi, a pump-action shotgun and a handgun shoots and kills 21 adults and children at a local McDonalds. A police sharpshooter kills Huberty one hour after the rampage begins.

18 killed - August 1, 1966 - In Austin, Texas, Charles Joseph Whitman, a former U.S. Marine, kills 16 and wounds at least 30 while shooting from a University of Texas tower. Police officers Ramiro Martinez and Houston McCoy shot and killed Whitman in the tower. Whitman had also killed his mother and wife earlier in the day.

14 killed - August 20, 1986 - Edmond, Oklahoma part-time mail carrier, Patrick Henry Sherrill, armed with three handguns kills 14 postal workers in ten minutes and then takes his own life with a bullet to the head.

13 killed - November 5, 2009 - Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan kills 13 people and injures 32 at Fort Hood, Texas, during a shooting rampage. He is convicted and sentenced to death.

13 killed - April 3, 2009 - In Binghamton, New York, Jiverly Wong kills 13 people and injures four during a shooting at an immigrant community center. He then kills himself.

13 killed - April 20, 1999 - Columbine High School - Littleton, Colorado. 18-year-old Eric Harris and

17-year-old Dylan Klebold kill 12 fellow students and one teacher before committing suicide in the school library.

13 killed - September 25, 1982 - In Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 40-year-old George Banks, a prison guard, kills 13 people including five of his own children. In September 2011, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturns his death sentence stating that Banks is mentally incompetent.

13 killed - September 5, 1949 - In Camden, New Jersey, 28-year-old Howard Unruh, a veteran of World War II, shoots and kills 13 people as he walks down Camden's 32nd Street. His weapon of choice is a German-crafted Luger pistol. He is found insane and is committed to a state mental institution. He dies at the age of 88.

12 killed - September 16, 2013 - Shots are fired inside the Washington Navy Yard killing 12. The shooter, identified as Aaron Alexis, 34, is also killed.

12 killed - July 20, 2012 - Twelve people are killed and 58 are wounded in a shooting at an Aurora, Colorado, movie theater screening of the new Batman film. James E. Holmes, 24, is taken into custody outside of the movie    theater. The gunman is dressed head-to-toe in protective tactical gear, set off two devices of some kind before spraying the theater with bullets from an AR-15 rifle, a 12-gauge shotgun and at least one of two .40-caliber handguns police recovered at the scene.

12 killed - July 29, 1999 - In Atlanta, 44-year-old Mark Barton kills his wife and two children at his home. He then opens fire in two different brokerage houses killing nine people and wounding 12. He later kills himself.

10 killed - March 10, 2009 - In Alabama, Michael McLendon of Kinston, kills 10 and himself. The dead include his mother, grandparents, aunt and uncle.

9 killed - March 21, 2005 - Red Lake High School, Red Lake, Minnesota. 16-year-old Jeff Weise kills his grandfather and another adult, five students, a teacher and a security officer. He then kills himself.

9 killed - June 18, 1990 - In Jacksonville, Florida, 42-year-old James Pough, angry about his car being repossessed, opens fire at at a General Motors Acceptance Corp. office, killing nine people. Pough takes his own life.

8 killed - October 12, 2011 - Eight people are killed during a shooting at the Salon Meritage in Seal Beach, California. The suspect, Scott Evans Dekraai, 41, of Huntington Beach, is arrested without incident as he is trying to leave the scene. The eight dead include Dekraai's ex-wife, Michelle Fournier, 48. He was armed with three guns -- a 9 mm Springfield, a Smith & Wesson .44 Magnum, and a Heckler & Koch .45 -- and was wearing body armor during the shooting rampage.

8 killed - August 3, 2010 - Manchester, Connecticut - Omar Thornton kills eight co-workers at Hartford Distributors before turning the gun on himself. Thornton had been asked to resign for stealing and selling alcoholic beverages.

8 killed - January 19, 2010 - Christopher Speight, 39, kills eight people at a house in Appomattox, Virginia. He surrenders to police at the scene the next morning, and is charged with one count of murder with additional charges pending.

8 killed - March 29, 2009 - In Carthage, North Carolina, 45-year-old Robert Stewart kills a nurse and seven elderly patients at a nursing home. In May, the Moore County district attorney announces she will seek the death penalty. On September 3, 2011, a jury finds Stewart guilty of second-degree murder. Stewart is sentenced to 141 to 179 years in prison.

8 killed - December 5, 2007 - In Omaha, Nebraska, 19-year-old Robert Hawkins goes to an area mall and kills eight shoppers before killing himself.

8 killed - July 1, 1993 - In San Francisco, 55-year-old Gian Luigi Ferri kills eight people in a law office and then kills himself.

8 killed - September 14, 1989 - In Louisville, Kentucky, 47-year-old Joseph Wesbecker armed with a AK-47 semiautomatic assault rifle, two MAC-11 semiautomatic pistols, a .38 caliber handgun, a 9-millimeter semiautomatic pistol and a bayonet kills eight co-workers at Standard Gravure Corporation and then kills himself. He had been placed on disability leave from his job due to mental problems.

8 killed - August 20, 1982 - In Miami, 51-year-old history teacher Carl Robert Brown, angry about a repair bill and armed with a shotgun, kills eight people at a machine shop. He flees by bicycle, but is shot in the back by a witness who pursued him. He was on leave from school for psychological treatment.

List of rampage killers (school massacres), by Wikipedia

List of school shootings in the United States, by Wikipedia

Starting with Pontiac's Rebellion school massacre on July 26, 1764 to August 6, 2014in River Woods Elementary when an 11-year-old student at RWES in Des Moines, Iowa, brought a BB gun to the school accompanied by two former students aged 11 & 16. The student admitted to having the weapon and making threats against 4 students. Police recovered the gun and arrested the alleged students
More, HERE.

America's Wars: U.S. Casualties and Veterans

The table below has information about the total number of service members, battle deaths, and nonmortal woundings in wars from 1775 to 2012; such as the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War I and II, Vietnam, and more
Information Please® Database, © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

67% of all homicides in the U.S. were conducted using a firearm: UN

According to the FBI, in 2012, there were 8,855 total firearm-related homicides in the US, with 6,371 of those attributed to handguns. 61% of all gun-related deaths in the U.S. are suicides. More, HERE by Wikipedia.

Crime in the United States

Crime in the United States has been present since colonization
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

© 2014 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Journalism in Mexico

Radio silenced. A crusading anchorwoman is pushed off the air

Mar 21st 2015 | MEXICO CITY

NEWS junkies in Mexico have woken up feeling bereft and baffled since March 16th. The feisty, staccato voice of Carmen Aristegui, a radio anchorwoman with almost cult status, especially among left-leaning listeners, has gone off the airwaves after a public row with her employer, MVS Radio. The radio group fired her despite acknowledging that she was one of Mexico’s most popular morning-show hosts, drew in advertisers and delivered scoops that scandalised the country. Even MVS Radio sounds remorseful. “It’s a situation in which everyone loses,” a spokesman admits.

Behind this falling out are problems that systematically undermine journalism in Mexico, where the media have long been dominated by political power. Many outlets, including MVS Radio, rely on the government for advertising and other perks. The biggest television networks, Televisa and TV Azteca, are a pliant duopoly.

More, HERE.

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Conflict of interest in Mexico

A false start

Mixed messages in a new anti-corruption campaign

The Mexican morass

A president who doesn’t get that he doesn’t get it

IN A new year message Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, promised to work to “liberate” his country from crime, corruption and impunity. His cabinet has duly set these as its priorities. The message is the right one. But unfortunately for Mr Peña, Mexicans are increasingly cynical about the messenger.
Mexico is still seething over the government’s leaden response to the kidnap in September of 43 students by municipal police in the south-western state of Guerrero and their apparent murder by drug traffickers. The investigation of the case seems to have stalled. Mr Peña’s main policy response to the massacre is a proposed constitutional amendment to abolish municipal police forces. But Congress may not approve it, not least because some are less rotten than the state forces, which would take their place.
More, HERE.

Scandal in Mexico: A murky mortgage

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa Was a Crime of the State - See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Questions surround the purchase of a house owned by the finance minister 

Dec 12th 2014

Mexico’s growing crisis: Reforms and democracy, but no rule of law

Nov 13th 2014

To save a promising presidency, Enrique Peña Nieto must tackle crime and corruption

From the print edition
DURING two years in office Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has received sharply contrasting reviews at home and abroad. Foreigners, including The Economist, have praised his structural reforms of the economy, which include an historic measure to open up energy to private investment (see article). Yet polls show that most Mexicans dislike Mr Peña. Among other things, they blame his government for a squeeze on living standards and the interlinked problems of violent crime and corruption. Sadly, recent events have lent support to Mr Peña’s domestic critics.
On November 8th Mexico’s attorney-general announced what almost everyone had already concluded: that 43 students from a teacher-training college in the southern state of Guerrero, who disappeared in the town of Iguala in late September, had been murdered by drug-traffickers after being kidnapped by the local police on the orders of the town’s mayor. Guerrero has been Mexico’s most violent state for centuries. The federal government bears no direct responsibility for these events. But Mexicans see in them a symbol of the failure of Mr Peña’s administration to make security a priority.
Now comes a problem that is uncomfortably close to home. The government had already opted to cancel a contract for a high-speed train that it had hastily awarded to the sole bidder, a consortium of Chinese and Mexican companies including a construction firm from the president’s home state. A local journalist has revealed that the boss of the same firm owns a $7m mansion that is the Peña family’s private residence (see article). The president denies any wrongdoing, but a common thread runs through these events.
Mexico only became a democracy in 2000, when seven decades of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the political machine that raised Mr Peña, were ended by electoral defeat. Unfortunately, democracy did not bring the rule of law to Mexico. Too many in the PRI still see the job of the police and the courts as enforcing political control, rather than investigating mobsters. Corrupt politicians are protected rather than punished. Organised crime and graft both remain a part of everyday life, and neither has been helped by the drugs flowing north to the United States.
More, HERE.
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Victims of Mexico’s drug war

Tracing the missing

Many thousands disappeared in Mexico’s drug war. The government should do more to find them

Mexico’s economy

Jam mañana

A frustrating start to the year

 

May 24th 2014 | MEXICO CITY | From the print edition

SO FAR this year Mexico’s government has resembled one of the country’s many devotees of St Jude, patron saint of lost causes. It has doggedly stuck to a 3.9% 2014 growth forecast, even though its main export market, the United States, has been sluggish, and the twin pillars of its domestic economy—buying and building—have fared even worse.

On May 21st the central bank revised its growth prediction down to 2.3-3.3%, from 3-4% previously. The government was expected finally to follow suit on May 23rd, when first-quarter GDP figures were due to be released. Even so, officials are convinced that within months the benefits of its plans to modernise the economy will start to show up in the numbers.

Mexicans have good reason to be sceptical.

More, HERE.

 

Copyright © The Economist Newspaper Limited 2013. All rights reserved.

The Guardian

Whistleblowers wanted: Mexican journalists seek tips through website

Top radio presenter Carmen Aristegui was fired on Sunday for participating in Mexicoleaks alliance to gain anonymous information to expose state corruption

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Mexico offered James Bond film studios millions to shoot its good side

Officials offered Sony Pictures and MGM up to $20m in tax incentives to make changes to upcoming Bond film that cast country in positive light

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Mexican mayoral candidate reportedly decapitated – body found on dirt road

The abduction and assassination of Aidé Nava continues to highlight the link between politics and drug war violence in the state of Guerrero

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UN: torture in Mexico occurs with 'impunity' at hands of security forces

Report based on a fact-finding visit to Mexico last spring outlines methods used during detentions to combat crime that include waterboarding and rape

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From California gang to Mexican vigilante: the family man fighting the drug cartels in Mexico – video

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Tourist dies and two injured after whale crashes into sightseeing boat off Mexico

Grey whale hit a tourist boat at Cabo San Lucas on the Mexican coast, say authorities, with a Canadian woman dying of her injuries

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Britain’s welcome for Mexican president is worrying

With revelations continuing to emerge about Enrique Peña Nieto’s links to big business, the decision to allow him a state visit to the UK is misjudged

Britain will roll out the red carpet for the Mexican president, Enrique Peña Nieto, when he arrives for his state visit in March. The government sees Mexico as a “springboard into the Latin American market”.

However, today’s Observer interview with 19-year-old Uriel Alonso Solís should serve as an antidote to the hype that will surround the visit. Alonso survived the attack by police in Guerrero state on students who were then kidnapped and handed over to a drug cartel for execution. One of Mexico’s leading reporters on narcotics, Anabel Hernández, published evidence in Proceso magazine that federal authorities had been involved.

More, HERE

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Snowden voted person of the year


Edward Snowden
In May Edward Snowden flew to Hong Kong where he gave journalists the material which blew the lid on the extent of US digital spying. Photograph: The Guardian/AFP/Getty Images

 

For the second year in a row, a young American whistleblower alarmed at the unfettered and at times cynical deployment of power by the world's foremost superpower has been voted the Guardian's person of the year.

Edward Snowden, who leaked an estimated 200,000 files that exposed the extensive and intrusive nature of phone and internet surveillance and intelligence gathering by the US and its western allies, was the overwhelming choice of more than 2,000 people who voted.

The NSA whistleblower garnered 1,445 votes. In a distant second, from a list of 10 candidates chosen by Guardian writers and editors, came Marco Weber and Sini Saarela, the Greenpeace activists who spearheaded the oil rig protest over Russian Arctic drilling. They received 314 votes. Pope Francis gained 153 votes, narrowly ahead of blogger and anti-poverty campaigner Jack Monroe, who received 144.
Snowden's victory was as decisive as Chelsea Manning's a year earlier.

More, HERE.

© 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.

latimes.com

Click on HERE to get the latest Los Angeles Times News

Live updates: Copilot treated at hospital March 10, but not for depression

Airlines move to require 2 people in the cockpit always

Opinion: There is no defense against pilot malice

Copilot may have hidden illness from employers

Authorities searching the homes of the copilot believed to have deliberately crashed his airliner into the French Alps say they found a torn up sick note from the man's doctor.

After mini-heat wave, cooler weekend ahead in Southern California


2 missing after New York City explosion that injured 25

Mexican farmworkers strike over low wages, blocking harvest

Thousands of pickers spill onto the streets this week to protest low wages in a bold demonstration -- the first strike by farmworkers here in decades.

Attacker cuts baby out of Colorado woman's womb; suspect held on $2-million bond

Bloody arrest of University of Virginia student sparks protest

Black man's body found hanging in tree in Mississippi

5 high school students in Tucson charged with plotting to kill classmate

S.F. police officer being investigated in text message probe resigns

L.A. orders tenants to vacate troubled Hollywood building

Navy SEAL killed during parachute training identified

Mexican journalist Carmen Aristegui fired by radio station

By Tracy Wilkinson, March 16, 2015

Carmen Aristegui, the award-winning Mexican journalist behind the exposure of numerous scandals involving the government and other holders of power, has lost her popular daily radio show in a dispute with the station’s owners

Venice High assault arrests stun students, parents; 11th teen arrested

LAPD officer accused of trying to smuggle Mexican citizen across border

Murder arrest warrant issued for LAPD officer in Pomona shooting

Police deny claims that officers beat Ferguson shooting suspect

LAPD's Beck defends discipline of officers in fatal Koreatown shooting

2 sought in San Bernardino woman's disappearance

For friends of Susan Berman, Durst's arrest comes as a relief

Who was Susan Berman? A look at Robert Durst's late friend

Durst, charged with murdering L.A. writer, faces new weapons charges

Durst's family gets protection order against him

Will evidence in Robert Durst trial be 'Jinxed'?

Prosecutors file murder charges against Robert Durst as questions remain about how much of the evidence uncovered in the documentary will be in the courtroom

3 killed in multi-vehicle crash on Pacific Coast Highway at Point Mugu

Pot-smoking stockbroker has a steady supplier: the feds

Facing off across the spot where two St. Louis-area officers were wounded by gunfire less than 24 hours earlier, police and protesters engage in an evening of stare-downs and posturing Thursday.

Today's Headlines: Fear in Ferguson; getting the lead out

Obama on 'Jimmy Kimmel Live': 'No excuse for criminal acts' in Ferguson

Ferguson seemed poised for change, then violence struck again

Ferguson unrest: What you need to know

'Survivor' producer convicted in wife's slaying got break, prosecutor says

Suspected drunk driver allegedly steals CHP vehicle

L.A. man convicted of producing child pornography in the Philippines

MMA fighter 'Mayhem' Miller charged with fighting two police officers

At UC Irvine, some say furor over attempted U.S. flag ban is overblown

Desert renewable energy plan is altered to win counties' support

Blacks, other minorities at University of Oklahoma tell of isolation

Jewels worth millions stolen in French highway attack

7 Marines, 4 soldiers presumed dead in Florida copter crash

Judge's new order makes it harder for Obama to restart immigration moves

Hillary Clinton reveals she deleted 30,000 emails

Airbnb and other short-term rentals worsen housing shortage, critics say

Fast-growing Airbnb and others like it say they help cash-strapped Angelenos earn extra money but critics say it is making Los Angeles one of the least affordable places to rent in the country.

Georgia police officer fatally shoots unarmed, naked black man

Oklahoma fraternity's racist chant may cost its black chef his job

Cyclist groups fighting California effort to require helmets

'Midnight Rider' director Randall Miller pleads guilty in train death

Narcissistic kid? Blame the parents, study says

For families of hit-and-run victims, haunting questions remain

Outraged state Republicans seek to forbid U.S. flag ban at universities

L.A. council candidate tells police his private email was hacked

Orange County sheriff's deputy stabbed by inmate

Exploding e-cigarette: Man burned; bed set on fire

Amber Alert canceled after abducted 1-year-old boy found in Mexico

A 1-year-old boy who was abducted after a violent stabbing at his mother's San Pedro home was found in Mexico late Monday, authorities said.

Tractor trailer carrying gold and silver robbed in North Carolina

Whittier police officers sue, say they were forced to meet quotas

LAPD delays identifying officers in fatal skid row shooting

San Diego investigator shoots suspect in car theft

O.C. man who allegedly tried to join ISIS indicted on new charges

LAPD officer shoots, kills pursuit suspect after cars collide

El Niño declared, rain may increase, feds say

Boston bombing trial to begin 2nd day

Ringling Bros. eliminating elephant acts

Seoul knife attack may crimp U.S. diplomat's friendly style

Steven Borowiec

Mark Lippert has been building a reputation as a warm guy interested in Korean culture. His approachable style may change after the slashing that left a four-inch gash on his cheek.

Trouble in San Bernardino nightclub preceded deadly shootout

36 of the 100 most dangerous rail crossings in U.S. are in SoCal

By Dan Weikel and Laura J. Nelson

A Times review also finds notable differences in county-to-county efforts to correct problems at rail crossings identified as the most dangerous by federal regulators.

Driver killed in single-vehicle crash in city of Industry

A motorist was killed early Sunday in a single-vehicle crash in the city of Industry, authorities said.

Firefighters extinguish fire near It's a Small World

Hit-and-run in Santa Ana leaves teen with life-threatening injuries

Man found dead in Lake Balboa home

Mother of dead baby charged with murder

Hail, thunderstorms forecast as storm moves in

More rain -- and even some hail and thunderstorms -- are in the forecast as a winter storm moves through.

Court ruling in Egypt is another setback for parliamentary elections

Suspect in fatal Chatsworth street racing crash surrenders to LAPD

Longshoremen maintain clout in era of globalization and automation

Despite some nightmares, poll finds voters still California Dreamin'

Police frustrated by witnesses' silence in fatal Valley race

Joseph Serna and Hailey Branson-Potts

'Nobody should cooperate with the cops,' one person wrote online in the aftermath of the crash. Police are still searching for two drivers.

LAFD failed to inspect hundreds of hazardous sites, state says

Army veteran's guilt over surviving Iraq is a wound that won't heal

Alan Zarembo

South Gate mayor who could take a punch — and a bullet — is stepping down

Who stole Lupita Nyong'o's $150,000 Oscar dress?...

Lupita Nyong'o's stolen Oscar dress recovered — most likely

Appeals court turns down request to relocate Boston Marathon bombing trial

Cuba demands to be taken off U.S. sponsor of terrorism list

Metrolink trains expand use of remote control safety system

Most Central Valley farmers unlikely to get federal water, again

Translating trust in Iraq, one Arabic greeting at a time

Today, real conversations between Americans and Iraqis are more necessary than weapons

Hundreds march against police abuse, black-on-black violence in South L.A.

Renewed outrage after O.C. double murder trial is delayed again

Two-thirds of San Diego County police shootings involved drugs, report says

Suspect who barricaded himself in Santa Monica apartment surrenders

Denial of parole for Mexican Mafia killer a relief to victim's family


A 26-year-old man was seriously injured in Norwalk Saturday after he was struck by a "party bus" in a hit and run, Los Angeles County sheriff's officials said.

Prop. 47's effect on jail time, drug rehab is mixed so far

Oscars 2015: Female directors scarce at Hollywood's major studios

Sheriff's SWAT team sent to Santa Monica suspect barricade incident

Women are leaving the tech industry in droves

Laurie Becklund: As I lay dying

I am dying, literally, at my home in Hollywood, of metastatic breast cancer, the only kind of breast cancer that kills. For six years I've known I was going to die. I just didn't know when.

 

Drug explosion follows oil boom on North Dakota Indian reservation


Copyright 2014

SPIEGEL ONLINE

Inside TAO: Documents Reveal Top NSA Hacking Unit

By SPIEGEL Staff

 

The article you are reading originally appeared in German in issue 1/2014 (December 30, 2013) of DER SPIEGEL.

 

Targeting Mexico

 

Mexico's Secretariat of Public Security, which was folded into the new National Security Commission at the beginning of 2013, was responsible at the time for the country's police, counterterrorism, prison system and border police. Most of the agency's nearly 20,000 employees worked at its headquarters on Avenida Constituyentes, an important traffic artery in Mexico City. A large share of the Mexican security authorities under   the auspices of the Secretariat are supervised from the offices there, making Avenida Constituyentes a one-stop shop for anyone seeking to learn more about the country's security apparatus.

 

More, HERE.

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Fresh Leak on US Spying: NSA Accessed Mexican President's Email

By Jens Glüsing, Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

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'Royal Concierge': GCHQ Monitors Diplomats' Hotel Bookings

By Laura Poitras, Marcel Rosenbach and Holger Stark

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Quantum Spying: GCHQ Used Fake LinkedIn Pages to Target Engineers

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Oil Espionage: How the NSA and GCHQ Spied on OPEC

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Belgacom Attack: Britain's GCHQ Hacked Belgian Telecoms Firm

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Cyber Attack: Belgians Angered by British Spying

© SPIEGEL ONLINE 2013, All Rights Reserved

Fox News

US intelligence assets in Mexico reportedly tied to murdered DEA agent

SCM's Travel Advisory:


September 11 attacks on World Trade Center by Wikipedia

Mexicans are advised to exercise MAXIMUM CAUTION, monitor developments that might affect your safety in the United States because of Hate Crimes. The FBI reports that hate crimes against Latinos rose almost 40 percent between 2003 and 2006, and Hispanic activists say they are being targeted with threats and intimidation.

This is just a recent incident: STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- A rash of recent assaults on Mexican immigrants has heightened tensions in Port Richmond, already on edge following the savage beating of a 25-year-old baker earlier this (April 2010) month.

In addition, no matter what your nationality the US in under permanent risk of terrorism. Visitors could be caught up in attacks targeted at American, British, Canadian, Australian citizens, others. Terrorists may attack official or  civilian targets. Crime rates are higher in the larger cities, such as New York, Los Angeles and Chicago.

 

Many parts of the United States are subject to different natural hazards, including earthquakes, fires or wildfires, floods, extreme heat, hurricanes, landslides and debris flow (mudslides), thunderstorms and lightning, tornadoes, tsunamis, volcanoes (Hawaii, Alaska and Pacific Northwest), winter storms (freezing rain, heavy snow and blizzards) and extreme cold.

 

Tourists are often targeted for petty crimes such as pick-pocketing and theft, particularly on public transport. It is recommended that before visiting your destination point, Google it and write NAME OF CITY TO BE VISITED, then "crime, areas to be avoided & gang activities" to determine your level of threat.  

Come Back Alive, a site dedicated to Dangerous Countries writes on quote: 

"There are more than 200 million guns in the possession of Americans. Most violent acts in the States are the result of robberies, domestic disputes and drug-related violence.

 

Terrorist acts, ranging from the killing of abortionist doctors to the bombing of the World Trade Center, are highly publicized but not considered a real threat to travelers. The threat of robbery or violent crime in inner cities and some tourist areas is real and should be taken seriously. Travel in America is considered safe (by .. Americans), and danger is confined to random violence and inner cities.

 

Those seeking adventure can find it in a New Orleans bar at five in the morning or strolling through South Central L.A. after midnight." .. 

TRAVEL ADVISORY: The Southern Poverty Law Center counted 932 active hate groups in the United States in 2009. Only organizations and their chapters known to be active during 2009 are included. More, HERE.

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Oct. 29, 2009 Washington Post: Obama signs hate crimes law

You Tube

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HATE CRIMES


RACISM AND ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION, by ABC News

MEXICAN HATE RALLY

The New Sport: Latino Hate Crime, ABC News

Mexican beaten by 3 racist Blacks on Staten Island, New York

US Border Patrol Agent Shoots Dead Mexican Teen on Mexican Soil

Border agent details immigrant abuse

Discrimination Against Latinos

American Heritage- KKK Lynching

 

Redneck Attacks Mexican flag

 

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TERRORISM, DRUGS

New report exposes CIA torture & rendition by Nick Harper

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MUST-READ Book: Cocaine Politics by Peter Dale Scott

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Drugs and the Economy - Peter Dale Scott

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Gary Webb on C.I.A. Trafficking of Cocaine

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CIA Torture Jet crashed with 4 Tons of COCAINE

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Former LA Police Officer Mike Ruppert Confronts CIA Director

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'I don't think drug trafficking will ever be stopped': Inside the world of the U.S. agent who went undercover with the cartels:

Mail Online, UK

--------------------------------

Celerino Castillo, by Wikipedia

Powderburns

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Marijuana legalization wins majority support in poll: Los Angeles Times

Marijuana, Officially Legal in Colorado

In 2006, former Mexican president Felipe Calderón launched a massive crackdown against drug trafficking organizations, in conjunction with the United States. Since then, more than 40,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence: 

-----------------------------

Council On Foreign Relations

Washington State Gears Up for Marijuana Industry: Voice of America

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Marijuana Legalization Canada: Liberal Party Lays Out Detailed Economic Plan For Pot: The Huffington Post, Canada

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England Wants To Legalize Marijuana Through Cannabis Drug Reform: Inquisitr. Ltd.

More HERE.

A change of scenery by Washington Post

U.S. citizens traveling internationally in 2012, by destination

 

A change of scenery
Source: Office of Travel and Tourism Industries, Commerce Department. The Washington Post. Published on May 24, 2013

Image Credit

Mexico Travel Warning

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling to certain places in Mexico due to threats to safety and security posed by organized criminal groups in the country.
U.S. citizens have been the target of violent crimes, such as kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery by organized criminal groups in various Mexican states.  For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, which can vary, travelers should reference the state-by-state assessments further below.  This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued August 15, 2014, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.
General Conditions: 

Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year for study, tourism, and business, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day.  The Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations, and there is no evidence that organized criminal groups have targeted U.S. visitors or residents based on their nationality.  Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that are reported in the border region or in areas along major trafficking routes. 

Nevertheless, U.S. travelers should be aware that the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter organized criminal groups that engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico.  The groups themselves are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity.  Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur anywhere.  U.S. citizens have fallen victim to criminal activity, including homicide, gun battles, kidnapping, carjacking, and highway robbery.  While many of those killed in organized crime-related violence have themselves been involved in criminal activity, innocent persons have also been killed.  The number of U.S. citizens reported to the Department of State as murdered in Mexico was 71 in 2012 and 81 in 2013. 

Gun battles between rival criminal organizations or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico.  Gun battles have occurred in broad daylight on streets and in other public venues, such as restaurants and clubs.  During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily    prevented from leaving the area. Criminal organizations have used stolen cars, buses, and trucks to create roadblocks on major thoroughfares, preventing the military and police from responding to criminal activity. The location and timing of future armed engagements is unpredictable.  We recommend that you defer travel to the areas specifically identified in this Travel Warning and exercise extreme caution when traveling throughout the other areas for which advisories are in effect.
The number of kidnappings throughout Mexico is of particular concern and appears to be on the rise.  According to statistics published by the Mexican Secretaria de Gobernacion (SEGOB), in 2013 kidnappings nationwide increased 20 percent over the previous year.  While kidnappings can occur anywhere, according to SEGOB, during this timeframe, the states with the highest numbers of kidnappings were Tamaulipas, Guerrero, Michoacán, Estado de Mexico, and Morelos.
Additionally, according to a widely publicized study by the agency responsible for national statistics (INEGI, the National Institute of Statistics and Geography), Mexico suffered an estimated 105,682 kidnappings in 2012; only 1,317 were reported to the police.  Police have been implicated in some of these incidents.  Both local and expatriate communities have been victimized.  Nearly 70 kidnappings of U.S. citizens were reported to the U.S. Embassy and consulates in Mexico between January and June of 2014.
U.S. citizens are encouraged to lower their personal profiles and to avoid displaying indicators of wealth such as expensive or expensive-looking jewelry, watches, or cameras.  U.S. citizens are encouraged to maintain awareness of their surroundings and avoid situations in which they may be isolated or stand out as potential victims.

Kidnappings in Mexico have included traditional, "express," and "virtual" kidnappings. Victims of traditional kidnappings are physically abducted and held captive until a ransom is paid for release.  "Express" kidnappings are those in which a victim is abducted for a short time and forced to withdraw money, usually from an ATM, then released.  A "virtual" kidnapping is an extortion-by-deception scheme wherein a victim is contacted by phone and convinced to isolate themselves from family and friends until a ransom is paid.  The victim is coerced (by threat of violence) to remain isolated and to provide phone numbers for the victim's family or loved ones.  The victim's family is then contacted and a ransom for the "kidnapped" extracted.  Recently, some travelers to Mexico staying at hotels as guests have been targets of such "virtual" kidnapping schemes.
Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments.  U.S. government personnel are specifically prohibited from patronizing these establishments in the states of Coahuila, Durango, Zacatecas, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosi, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas.
Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the border region, and U.S. citizens have been murdered in such incidents.  Most victims who complied with carjackers' demands have reported that they were not physically harmed.
Carjackers have shot at vehicles that have attempted to flee.  Incidents have occurred during the day and at night, and carjackers have used a variety of techniques, including roadblocks, bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop, and running vehicles off the road at high speeds.  There are indications that criminals target newer and larger vehicles, especially dark-colored SUVs.  However, even drivers of old sedans and buses coming from the United States have been targeted.  While violent incidents can occur anywhere and at any time, they most frequently occur at night and on isolated roads.  To reduce risk when traveling by road, we strongly urge you to travel between cities throughout Mexico only during daylight hours, to avoid isolated roads, and to use toll roads ("cuotas") whenever possible. 

The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat organized criminal groups.  U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways by car or bus may encounter government checkpoints, staffed by military or law enforcement personnel.  In some places, criminal organizations have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and have killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them.  You should cooperate at all checkpoints. 

The Department imposes restrictions on U.S. government employees' travel in Mexico.  Since July 2010, USG employees are prohibited from driving on non-official travel from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior of Mexico or Central America.  One exception is that personal travel by motor vehicle is permitted on Highway 15 toll road between Hermosillo and Nogales during daylight hours.
U.S. government personnel and their families are prohibited from personal travel to all areas to which it is advised to "defer non-essential travel".  When travel for official purposes is essential, it is conducted with extensive security precautions.  U.S. government personnel and their families are allowed to travel for personal reasons to the areas where no advisory is in effect or where the advisory is to exercise caution.  While the general public is not forbidden from visiting places categorized under "defer non-essential travel," U.S. government personnel will not be able to respond quickly to an emergency situation in those areas due to security precautions that must be taken by U.S. government personnel to travel to those areas. 

For more information on road safety and crime along Mexico's roadways, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information

State-by-State Assessment: 

Below is a state-by-state assessment of security conditions throughout Mexico.  Travelers should be mindful that even if no advisories are in effect for a given state, crime and violence can still occur.  For general information about travel and other conditions in Mexico, see our Country Specific Information

More, HERE

 

The New York Times

Mexican Journalist Is Fired After Report About First Lady

Carmen Aristegui, who has a long record of exposing the foibles of Mexico’s elite and exposed a possible conflict of interest involving the first lady, was fired Sunday from MVS Radio.

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Mexican Political Family Has Close Ties to Ruling Party, and Homes in the U.S.

The properties stand in contrast to the working-man image promoted by José Murat Casab, a longtime party insider, and his son, a top housing official.

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Towers of Secrecy

Stream of Foreign Wealth Flows to Elite New York Real Estate

From Frommer's

Introduction to Mexico
The Best Cultural Experiences
The Best Beach Vacations
The Best Active Vacations
The Best Places to Get Away from It All
Getting There
Getting Around
Fast Facts
In One Week
In Two Weeks

MEXICO POPULAR DESTINATIONS 

See All 37 Destinations

Acapulco

Baja California

Cabo San Lucas

Campeche

Cancun

Chichen Itza

Colima

Mexico City

Yucatan Peninsula

MORE MEXICO TRAVEL, HERE.

© 2013 The New York Times Company

The Naturalization Process and Current Trends in Immigration in the United States: By Gender, By Age and By Marital Status

In 2011, the total number of persons naturalizing was 694,193. The leading countries of birth of new citizens were Mexico (94,783), India (45,985), the Philippines (42,520), the People's Republic of China (32,864), and Colombia (22,693). The largest number of persons naturalizing lived in California (151,183), Florida (87,309), and New York (76,603).

Historical trends have shown that the average number of persons that are naturalized annually has increased from less than 120,000 during the 1950s and 1960s to 210,000 during the 1980s, to 500,000 during the 1990s, and to 680,000 between 2000 and 2009. Naturalizations rose sharply during the mid-1990s because of various factors that include: 1) the 2.7 million undocumented immigrants legalized under the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 making them eligible for citizenship; 2) legislative efforts to restrict public benefits for non-citizens; and 3) the implementation of a mandatory program requiring replacement of permanent resident cards issued before 1977.

More, HERE.

 

Information submitted to Security Corner in Mexico by Cooper Brimm, American Immigration Center

16 Ways to Get Through the Airport Faster

With airports that seem busier than ever, airline staffing reductions creating longer lines at check-in and airport security wait times that can be entirely unpredictable, these days the old airport "two-hour" rule often leaves just minutes to spare to buy a magazine, grab a snack or hustle your kids into the bathroom. Saving a few extra minutes here and there along the way can add up in your favor; here are 16 tips to get you from your front door to your seat on the plane as quickly and painlessly as possible -- as well as some ideas to keep you moving no matter what is going on with your flight.

More, HERE

© 2013 The Independent Traveler, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

15 Travel Tips to Get Through TSA Security


The savviest of travelers understand the security requirements and plan ahead. In the United States, airport security is run by the Transportation Security Administration, a division of the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees border security as well as technological research, response to national disasters and terrorism, and intelligence analysis.

 

These tips reflect TSA policies as of November 2012. And for students enrolled in a homeland security program, knowing this information is vital and applicable to your future career.

 

More, HERE.

© 2013, Master of Homeland Security

COMMUNITY NEWS

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¿DE VISITA EN LA CIUDAD DE MEXICO, D. F.?

Panadería La Espiga


INSURGENTES SUR 455, HIPODROMO CONDESA, CUAUHTEMOC, C.P. 06170, DF. Tel: (55)5564-7763(55)5564-7763 (55)5564-7763(55)5564-7763 

"Ir al metro Chilpancingo es una de mis aventuras favoritas porque puedo visitar la panadería La Espiga. Este lugar lleva más de veinte años en el mismo lugar y tiene cosas deliciosas que ofrecer. Su tamaño es enorme, y dentro puedes encontrar comida, refrescos y bebidas, postres, entre otras cosas. El primer pasillo tiene papas y comida chatarra que puedes consumir. El segundo pasillo tiene todos los refrescos y las aguas al tiempo, en el fondo podrás encontrar los refrigeradores que tienen los refrescos y aguas frías, así como hielo". Más, AQUI.

 

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¿DE VISITA EN ZIPOLITE, OAXACA?

Restaurante La Pasión by Trip Advisor
La PasiOn

Jaime Díaz Arguelles
La Pasión, Col. Roca Blanca
Tel. no. 9581091824
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Restaurante El Alquimista by Trip Advisor

Marisquería, Pasta & Pizza

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Autos con 15 Años de Antiguedad Dejarán de Circular en el D. F. Dos Veces a la Semana

http://www.solucionpolitica.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/hoy-no-circula.jpg

CREDITO DE LA IMAGEN: SOLUCION POLITICA

 

Cars Older than 15 Years will not circulate twice a Week
Tanya Müller García
Tanya Muller García, Secretaria del Medio Ambiente del Distrito Federal

 

Mexico City's Environment Secretariat

HOY NO CIRCULA

New Program of (Your Car) Does not Circulate in Mexico City. More information, HERE by Wikipedia

S P E C I A L   A N N O U N C E M E N T

Olivier Tschumi
Olivier Tschumi, a Swiss citizen, relocated to Mexico 22 years ago. He was kidnapped while jogging with his two dogs in a park north of Cuernavaca in the morning of December 19, 2010. A ransom was paid to the kidnappers on December 21 of same year, but Olivier continues to be in captivity to this date. Authorities have no leads to the kidnappers.

Security Corner in Mexico has been requested by Mr. Tschumi's family in Switzerland to have this information available to our readers in the event you happen to know or hear of Olivier's whereabouts. The Mexican Federal Attorney General's Office (PGR) is offering $5 million pesos as a reward to anybody providing information that will lead to the whereabouts of Mr. Tschumi

If you have any information, please write to Olivier's sister ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). Olivier has a 12-year old waiting to hear from you too. More information, in Spanish HERE
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Olivier Tschumi, citoyen suisse, s'est installé au Mexique il y a 22 ans. Au matin du 19 décembre 2010,  Il a été enlevé  lors d'un jogging avec ses deux chiens dans une forêt au nord de Cuernavaca. Une rançon a été payée selon les exigences des ravisseurs le 21 décembre de la même année. Olivier n'a pas été libéré, il a disparu depuis ce jour. L'enquête, menée par les  autorités mexicaines piétine.  Désespérée, la famille Tschumi en Suisse implore l'aide de tout le monde pour retrouver Olivier. Toute information concernant les ravisseurs et  sa localisation sera utile et  bienvenue. La famille d'Olivier a grand besoin de votre aide et vous remercie.

Le Bureau du procureur général fédéral mexicain offre $ 5.000.000 pesos en récompense à qui fournira des informations conduisant à retrouver Monsieur Tschumi. Si vous avez des informations, s'il vous plaît écrivez à la sœur d'Olivier, Email:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Olivier a une fille de 12 ans qui espère retrouver son papa grâce à votre aide! Plus d'informations en espagnol ICI

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Culture of Safe Travel, Crime & Loss Prevention

 

VIDEOS

 

INTRODUCTION (English language) 

INTRODUCCION A ESQUINA DE LA SEGURIDAD


PREVENTING KIDNAPPING EXPRESS IN MEXICO CITY

MEXICO CITY SUBWAY SYSTEM, SAFE, EFFICIENT, INEXPENSIVE


WORDS OF ADVISE FROM SUBWAY SECURITY PERSONNEL

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Mexico City Hash House Harriers

INTERNATIONAL DRINKING Jarra CLUB WITH A RUNNING PROBLEM

www.mchhh.com

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www.mchhh.com

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SOCIAL SERVICES

 

Cuernavaca's Center for Happy Sr. Citizens, contributing to the enhancement of life quality. Monday to Friday: 8AM to 14:00 hrs. Among other courses specially designed for the elderly: literature, history, philosophy, IT, English, Spanish, artistic workshops: music, painting, cuisine, manual art; sports and entertainment: dancing, zumba, danzon, yoga, aqua-aerobics, reading. Emotions' handling, conferences, legal advise for inheritance, tanatology.

More information: Río Amacuzac 435, Col. Vistahermosa, tels. (01- 777) 221-6250(01- 777) 221-6250 Contact person: Alejandra Morales Leija

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American Benevolent Society

 

American Benevolent Society Newsletter by American_Benevolent

Paseo de la Reforma 1870-201 Lomas de Chapultepec, Miguel Hidalgo. Mexico, D.F. 11000 Mexico

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B E W A R E

New fines in the D.F. as of the first of January, 2015


1.- $1,290 pesos for failing to "verificar" the car plus $790.00 to get the ¨"verification" (smog emission test)
2.- THIS IS BIG - $12,000 FOR USE OF A CELL PHONE.  DON'T EVEN HAVE IT IN YOUR HAND.
3.- $700 for not using your seatbelt, even the back seat.
4.- $2,500 for expired plates plus the cost of the renewal.
5. You don't have to pay registration on brand new cars.
6. $18,000 fine if you hit someone in an enebriated condition plus 3-9 years in jail.
7.- $3,500 if you are stopped and fail to pass the alcohol test.
8.- $1,500 for playing the radio at more than 50 decibeles.
9.- PLEASE SHARE THIS INFORMATION.  

Remember that as an foreigner there are very strict limits to participation in political activities.  When in doubt, don't.
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New "HOY NO CIRCULA" rules go into effect Tuesday, July 1, 2014‏

Here's an explanation of how the new program "hoy no circula" works, starting TUESDAY, July 1st

 

If you have any information that is different from this PLEASE let us know right away so we can send it out. Brand new vehicles that have the hologram 00 are able to drive for two years, the car will have to update the hologram  at the expiration date and be inspected . You have two months after the expiration date to renew the hologram (have the car inspected).
Hologram 0, if your vehicle does not pass the 00 you will be given the hologram 0.  You can still drive everyday of the month, but instead of the two years permit, the expiration is set for six months, then you will have to renew the hologram. For information on the dates of the renewal, the link of the government will be posted at the end of the mail.
Hologram 1, this hologram is usually for vehicles between 9 and 15 years of usage. the vehicles with the hologram number 1 will not be able to circulate two Saturdays a month and one day on midweek. (the Saturday depends on the license plate of the car, see the government link for more details) and one day on midweek that also depends on the license plate of the car.

And there will be the new hologram 2.

 

According to the news of El Universal vehicles with the hologram number 2 that are over 15 years in circulation will not be able to circulate any Saturday of the month and also one day midweek.

 

It seems that the government is willing to change the hologram 2 for the hologram 1 if the vehicles pass the regulation test. This regulation will start on Tuesday July 1st. of 2014.  For more details here is the link of the news. And here is the link for the government program "Hoy no circula"

 

Talking history: The American Benevolent Society turns 140 by Catherine Dunn, Insidemex

 

History

Oprima ESTE ENLACE electrónico para ver las noticias actualizadas de México de CNN en Español de esta fecha

Narcos pagaron 'fiestas de sexo' a agentes de la DEA

- La DEA ha fallado en sancionar la conducta de sus agentes en el extranjero, según un reporte del Departamento de Justicia de EU

- El documento apunta que los agentes participaron en fiestas de sexo pagadas por el narco, además de recibir regalos caros

- También reportó casos de conducta sexual inapropiada en la ATF, la DEA y la Marina, aunque son pocos

La nueva Ley de Aguas plantea darte menos líquido

La iniciativa estipula 50 litros diarios como mínimo de agua, y organizaciones dicen que México puede dar 100 litros diarios por habitante Ir a la nota

IFT aprueba otorgar concesión de TV a Cadena Tres

El órgano regulador dijo que la empresa cumplió con los requisitos; la empresa ya pagó los 1,808 millones de pesos Ir a la nota

Voto 2015

Córdova y Bribiesca, candidatos del PRI, PVEM y Pan

Ivonne Álvarez promete "revisar" el Monterrey VI

El Partido Verde pide un préstamo tras ser multado

El PRI y PAN, en empate técnico en Sonora: encuesta

Últimas noticias

Astronauta se lanza al espacio para hacer historia

Muere Tomas Tranströmer, nobel de Literatura 2011

'No pararemos', la consigna a 6 meses de Ayotzinapa fotogaleria

Dos desaparecidos tras explosión de edificio en NY

California de nuevo en México, cortesía en Chechenia

"No trabajo para colgarme medallitas": Peña Nieto

Santana, festivales y mucho cine para este 'finde'

'No hay cabildeo contra fiscalización': Escudero

Granada es lanzada cerca de televisora en Tamaulipas

7 muertos y 19 desaparecidos por lluvias en Chile

Venezuela está lista para un diálogo con EU, indica Maduro

Aerolíneas exigirán dos personas en cabina, siempre

© 2006 Derechos Reservados Expansión, S.A. DE C.V.

El Universal has no official political affiilation and is the most read newspaper in Mexico

MEXICO NEWS IN ENGLISH BY EL UNIVERSAL, HERE

Three killed by floods in Veracruz

BlackRock and First Reserve take US$900 million stake in Mexico pipeline project

Authorities rescue 39 Central American migrants

Julión Alvarez takes over the National Auditorium

NATION | THE TWO MEXICAN VICTIMS OF THE PLANE CRASH

Daniela Ayón, 36, and Dora Isela Salas, 45, were on board of the Germanwings flight

174 mass graves have been found in 16 states

According to the authorities, only 20% of the 601 bodies have been identified

Finance | Ford recalls 6,035 vehicles sold in Mexico

Ford recalls vehicles for potential issues with door handles, vacuum pump relays and sensors

CARMEN ARISTEGUI HOLDS A PRESS CONFERENCE

The journalist asked MVS senior partners to reconsider the reinstatement of her team and proposed a meeting next Monday to overcome the dispute.  Full story

WORLD | Corruption is endemic in Mexico: U.S.

The Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs said in its 2015 report

NATION | Economic impact of violence in Mexico is US$233b

The Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) said in its Mexico Peace Index 2015.

NATION | Fraga denies money from EPN's campaign

He is under investigation in Spain for alleged illegal operations at Banco de Madrid

ZÓCALO IS REOPENED AFTER REHEARSAL FOR ´SPECTRE´

The filming of the new James Bond movie, that will require over 1,000 extras, starts tomorrow. | Full story

AYOTZINAPA PARENTS VISIT U.S. TO BRING ATTENTION TO THE CASE

The parents will press international bodies including the United Nations to help bring the students home and will denounce human rights violations in Mexico. | Full story

Three kidnapped miners were slain in Guerrero

79 cases of chikungunya confirmed in Guerrero

Four bodies found in crematorium are identified

Authorities of Guerrero said that the owner of the crematorium remains at large and the investigations for fraud will continue.

Pemex launches ethanol biofuel program to cut emissions

Five members of 'Los Zetas' cartel arrested in Nuevo León

Popocatépetl spews 76 exhalations

Texas Senate revives 'sanctuary cities' immigration debate

Carmen Aristegui demands return of fired journalists

NGO urges Mexico, CA, and U.S. to protect migrant children

President of Guatemala to pay official visit to Mexico

President Peña Nieto meets with Italy's Foreign Minister

Authorities rescue 31 kidnapped migrants in Tamaulipas Cartera

Kia Motors will start selling cars in Mexico in July

Leader of Independent Cartel of Acapulco is arrested

Víctor Aguirre Garzón, also known as "El Gordo", was identified as the leader of the Independent Cartel of Acapulco (CIDA).

Mexican grandmother kills baby with power saw in U.S.

Manuela Rodríguez, 52, tried to suffocate her granddaughter by shoving a sock in her mouth and then used a power saw to cut the baby's throat

Authorities revoke arrest warrant against 'El Americano'

Luis Antonio Torres,'El Americano' and nine members of his group were released after considering they acted in self-defense during a clash in La Ruana, Michoacán on December 16, 2014.

Mexican Mafia member to be executed this week in Texas

Manuel Vásquez, 46, is accused of beating and strangling a San Antonio woman who refused to pay a Mexican Mafia-imposed tax on her illegal drug sales.

Mexico's Gulf cartel managers get long prison sentences in Texas

José Luis Zúñiga Hernández and his brother, Armando Arizmendi Hernández, were sentenced to 50 and 35 years in prison, respectively.

Detroit art museum to open Diego and Frida exhibition in March

'Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo in Detroit' will feature nearly 70 works by the Mexican artists and is the first to focus on the 11 months they spent in Detroit between 1932 and 1933.

Mexico must investigate torture: Amnesty International

Carlos Cascos becomes new Secretary of State of Texas

Aircrafts property of 'Z42' are seized in Nuevo León

Criminals launder US$29 billion every year between Mexico and the U.S.

Mexico is being demolished: Del Toro

Jorge Salinas says that Mexico has the government it deserves

Fox supports dialogue with organized crime

Four people arrested after attack against Matamoros mayor

Brother of Aguirre Rivero accused of misappropriation of US$19.2 million

10 February 2015
He and the other detainees posed as legal representatives of companies used to obtain the money. 

Carlos Mateo Aguirre Rivero, brother of the former governor of Guerrero, Ángel Aguirre, was arrested along with six other people accused of misappropriation of funds for US$19.2 million dollars.
Tomás Zerón de Lucio, head of the Criminal Investigation Agency, informed at a press conference that the arrest was carried out by federal officers. He added that Luis Ángel Aguirre Pérez, Paulo Ignacio Hughes Acosta, Mauricio Francisco Hughes Acosta, Alejandro Carlos Hughes Acosta and Jorge Eduardo Hughes Acosta were also arrested.
More, HERE.

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Murat denies article published by The New York Times

According to the newspaper their family 'has acquired a half-dozen properties in the United States.'
After The New York Times published an article about the six alleged properties in exclusive buildings in the US owned by José Murat, the former governor of Oaxaca denied the information and requested that the daily clarifies the situation.
"In this article I am included in a list of people who have a relationship with the Time Warner building," says the Mexican politician in a letter to editor Margaret Sullivan. "We only bought two apartments/condos in the state of Utah more than 10 years ago, with a cost of approximately US$300.000", he explained.
More, HERE.
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The New York Times exposes the properties of José Murat in the U.S.

According to the newspaper the family of the former governor of Oaxaca has acquired a half-dozen properties in the United States. 

José Murat Casab, former governor of Oaxaca and negotiator of the "Mexico Pact", is part of a series entitled "The Hidden Money Buying Up New York Real Estate" published by The New York Times.
The newspaper describes him as a "head of a prominent political family and former governor of Oaxaca" and adds that "his son, Alejandro, leads a government housing agency." According to the newspaper their family "has acquired a half-dozen properties in the United States."
More, HERE.
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Their lawyer and lawyer demanded the continuation of the investigation and results based on scientific evidence.    

The official position expressed by the Office of the Attorney General (PGR), implying that the Ayotzinapa students missing since September 26 were killed and burned was rejected by the spokesperson and the lawyer of their parents.

"We will never accept the version of the Attorney General," expressed Felipe de la Cruz in an interview with Paola Rojas for media conglomerate Radio Fórmula.

More, HERE

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Oprima AQUI para ver noticias actualizadas del periódico El Universal

COMERCIANTES BLOQUEAN ROJO GÓMEZ

Los integrantes del Consejo Asesor del Comercio denuncian la creciente inseguridad por lo que también hay cierres a la altura de Periférico Oriente y en Metro Atlalilco | Ver nota

PESADILLA DE LA QUE NO PUEDEN DESPERTAR

Tras 180 días de búsqueda, familiares de los normalistas desaparecidos manifiestan ira, pesar y desgaste | Ver nota | Video

JAVIER AGUIRRE LLEGA A JUZGADO DE VALENCIA

El DT mexicano se presentó en la Ciudad de la Justicia de Valencia, en España, para comparecer por un presunto amaño de partidos en la temporada 2011 de La Liga. | Ver nota

FUERTE EXPLOSIÓN EN VOLCÁN DE FUEGO

El volcán de Colima registró a las 08:18 hrs una exhalación de 3500 mts; se espera caída de ceniza en zonas aledañas | Ver nota

Desempleo en México bajó a 4.3% en febrero pasado

En términos mensuales desestacionalizados, sin factores coyunturales por temporada, el desempleo se situó en el 4.5 % el mes pasado, tasa similar a la de enero, de 4.43 %

Cartera

BMV gana tras dos pronunciadas caídas

La Bolsa gana pero se mantiene en peor nivel en más de dos semanas; se espera poca liquidez en los próximos días por Semana Santa

SFP: Antes que termine 2015, resultados por inmuebles

El secretario de la Función Pública, Virgilio Andrade, aseguró que será durante este mismo año que se den resultados de la investigación derivada de las compras de inmuebles por parte de Angélica Rivera y Luis Videgaray

Casa blanca, ajena a calendario electoral: SFP

Metrópoli

Cierran Reforma para instalar escenario para Santana

El gobierno capitalino informó que permancerá cerrado de la Glorieta de la Palma y Florencia y será liberado para la realización del Ciclotón del domingo 29 de marzo

Santana dará concierto en el Ángel de la Independencia

Periodismo de datos

México, el menos pacífico de Centroamérica

Durante dos años, los delitos cometidos con armas de fuego aumentaron 11%.

De no existir previa autorización, queda expresamente prohibida la publicación, retransmisión, edición y cualquier otro uso de los contenidos de El Universal



Proceso is a weekly magazine, renowned for its left-wing journalism

Oprima AQUI para ver las noticias actualizadas de la revista Proceso de esta fecha

Agentes de la DEA participaron en fiestas sexuales pagadas por narcos: EU


26 de marzo de 2015

Por segunda vez en el año, arrojan granada contra Televisa Matamoros

GUANAJUATO, Gto., (proceso.com.mx).- El comité estatal del Partido Acción Nacional tuvo que sustituir a dos de sus candidatos a cargos de elección para los comicios del 7 de junio próximo, debido a que uno de ellos enfrenta un proceso penal …

Grabación del agente 007 deja pérdidas de 60% en Centro Histórico: Canacope

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).– No sólo las marchas y manifestaciones afectan a los comercios ubicados en el centro histórico; el cierre de calles provocado por la …

Ante encuestas adversas, Peña responde: “no trabajo para colocarme medallitas”

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Dos casas encuestadoras coincidieron en señalar que el presidente Enrique Peña Nieto enfrenta el mayor nivel de desaprobación desde que inició su …

Se han tenido presidentes malos y corruptos, pero ninguno como Peña: AMLO

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- El líder del partido Movimiento Regeneración Nacional (Morena), Andrés Manuel López Obrador, celebró el “despertar ciudadano” que se refleja en la encuesta …

Por desaparición de normalistas hay 104 detenidos: PGR

MÉXICO, D.F. (proceso.com.mx).- La Procuraduría General de la República (PGR) calificó la investigación sobre los 43 desaparecidos de Ayotzinapa de “transparente, exhaustiva y apegada a …

Suman tres personas muertas por volcadura de pipa en Tabasco

Copiloto ocultó a Germanwings que padecía enfermedad

Javier Aguirre declara ante el juzgado por presunto amaño de partido

Registran a hijo de Mario Villanueva como candidato a diputado federal plurinominal

TUXTLA GUTIÉRREZ, Chis., (proceso.co.mx).- Miembros de la Agencia de Investigación Criminal (AIC), de la Procuraduría General de la República (PGR) en coordinación con la Interpol, capturaron en Tapachula a Hugo Edgardo Sierra Benavides, conocido como “El Loco”, uno de los …

Si el gobierno acaba con medios democráticos, nuestro movimiento se cae: normalistas

Aprueba Senado ley para proteger a miles de menores con autismo en México

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Por unanimidad, todas las bancadas del …

Inicia Conapred queja contra diputada racista del PRI

MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- El Consejo Nacional para Prevenir la …

A seis meses de Ayotzinapa, bloquean sedes electorales en Oaxaca, Guerrero y Michoacán

MÉXICO, D.F., (proceso.com.mx).- A seis meses de la desaparición …

Congreso de Veracruz aprueba desafuero del alcalde de Medellín

XALAPA, Ver., (apro).- Con 35 votos del PRI, Nueva …

Periodista maya se ampara contra Comisión de Derechos Humanos de Q. Roo

CANCÚN, Q. Roo (apro).- El periodista y activista maya …

Frenan senadores del PRI y PAN debate sobre despido de Aristegui

MÉXICO, D.F. (proceso.com.mx).- Senadores del PRI y el PAN …

PROCESO 2003
Ediciòn 2003; 21 de Marzo, 2015

Aristegui: la censura y el despido, por presión de Los Pinos

Tras ser despedida de su espacio informativo en el Grupo MVS –con un pretexto baladí–, Carmen Aristegui habla con Proceso y da pormenores de las dificultades que enfrentó para difundir el año pasado el famoso reportaje de la Casa …

Sombras de sospecha

La revista The Economist, de Gran Bretaña, país cuya familia real recibió espectacularmente en Londres, en visita de Estado, a la familia presidencial mexicana a mediados de este mes, publicó la semana pasada un texto que, desde su entrada, …

MVS, en “grave retroceso”: el ómbudsman

Desde agosto de 2014, con la intromisión a la vida privada del conductor Pedro Ferriz de Con, y en diciembre del mismo año, con la difusión de una campaña pagada en espacios informativos contra la empresa francesa Alstom, Grupo …

Corrupción

Las turbulencias bancarias de Gabino Fraga

Contratista y amigo de Enrique Peña Nieto, Gabino Fraga ofrece asesorías legales a empresas para venderle proyectos al gobierno federal; lo malo es que también es delegado fiduciario de Banobras. Esto hace pensar que no hizo por desconocimiento las …

El saldo del “monexgate” en España

Los autores del operativo Monex, mediante el cual presuntamente se fondeó la campaña del presidente Enrique Peña Nieto, no tomaron en cuenta que el triunfo priista no implica impunidad en todos los países por los cuales dispersaron los recursos …

Ayotzinapa

Sus propios informes comprometen al Ejército

Un expediente de la Secretaría de la Defensa, entregado a este semanario gracias a la Ley de Transparencia, demuestra que, contra lo dicho ante diputados por el general Salvador Cienfuegos, el Ejército sí conoció de las agresiones de la …

Mentiras y verdades a medias de la investigación

¿Los militares de Iguala contratan funerarias privadas para incinerar restos? ¿El FBI vino a investigar el caso Ayotzinapa? ¿El Instituto de Biología de la UNAM confirmó con estudios a plantas y moscos la versión de la PGR de que …

Narcotráfico

El gobierno de Calderón acordó con el de Obama el tráfico ilegal de armas

Los operativos de Washington para introducir armas a México, con el propósito de desmantelar a las organizaciones encargadas de traficarlas, eran del conocimiento y tenían la colaboración de la administración calderonista. No obstante, los fusiles siempre acababan en manos …

Y siguen entrando, de una en una

DOUGLAS-NOGALES, Arizona.- Desde que el gobierno de Enrique Peña Nieto insiste en proyectar a la comunidad internacional la imagen de un México menos violento, el ingreso de armas provenientes de Estados Unidos se ha disparado respecto a lo ocurrido …

En intercambio, la “peste negra” mexicana

WASHINGTON.- En los últimos 13 años, la cantidad de muertes por sobredosis de heroína casi se cuadruplicó en Estados Unidos: Cada año, los decesos por esta causa han aumentado alrededor de 37%, revela un reporte del Centro Nacional de …

Estados

Rebelión en San Quintín

Una semana agitada vivió el Valle de San Quintín, al sur de Ensenada, Baja California. Un paro de jornaleros agrícolas derivó el martes 17 en bloqueos carreteros y saqueos. Las autoridades respondieron la madrugada del miércoles 18 con detenciones …

Elecciones 2015

Nuevo León El derrumbe de la credibilidad electoral

Las flamantes comisiones estatales encargadas de organizar los comicios son una primera muestra del fracaso de la reforma en la materia y de la incapacidad del Instituto Nacional Electoral para garantizar imparcialidad y certezas. En Nuevo León, por ejemplo, …

El independiente que amenaza

Siempre sonriente, jovial a sus 49 años, Felipe de Jesús Cantú Rodríguez agita la mano derecha frente a su rostro: “Yo traigo mi banderita blanca”. …

Querétaro Reciclaje de consejeros

Como marca la ley, en Querétaro se formó un nuevo órgano electoral armado por la autoridad federal. Pero buena parte de los flamantes consejeros estatales ya integraban las anteriores instituciones electorales y, más importante, la mayoría de ellos están …

San Luis Potosí Consejo ciudadano… repudiado por los ciudadanos

En San Luis Potosí algunos de los nuevos consejeros electorales no tienen la menor experiencia en organizar comicios… y otros tienen tanta que incluso les han girado órdenes de aprehensión por permitir cochupos o han tenido tiempo de congraciarse …

PROCESO 1998
Edición 1998; 14 de Febrero, 2015

© 2013 Proceso

 

 

Last Updated on Friday, 27 March 2015 13:05
 
Russian Roulette Ends In 17-Year-Old Southern California Boy's Death; Gas Explosion In Mexico Caused By Worn Bolts On Gas Truck; 32 In US, Mexico Accused In Gold-For-Cash Laundry Scheme; Mexico: 5 Federal Police Wounded In Standoff With Local Cops
Sunday, 18 January 2015 11:21

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Home

The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners - Public Service

For a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper or news site through the use of its journalistic resources, including the use of stories, editorials, cartoons, photographs, graphics, videos, databases, multimedia or interactive presentations or other visual material, a gold medal. Awarded to The Washington Post for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security. and Awarded to The Guardian US for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, helping through aggressive reporting to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.

Finalists also nominated as a finalist in this category was Newsday, Long Island, N.Y., for its use of in-depth reporting and digital tools to expose shootings, beatings and other concealed misconduct by some Long Island police officers, leading to the formation of a grand jury and an official review of police accountability.

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INTERNATIONAL

Video prompts Egypt to bomb Islamic State

The airstrikes came after the militants released a horrific video that appeared to show the beheading of 21 Egyptian Christian hostages.

Pro-Iran militias’ success against Islamic State could undermine U.S.

Gold vs. salmon: EPA targeted for rare ‘veto’ plan

Joby Warrick

One of the world’s great buried fortunes — $120 billion worth of gold — sits underneath another treasure — the spawning ground for the planet’s biggest runs of sockeye salmon.

Before and after the White House: Where the presidents lived

Former home of President Hoover in 1937. (Underwood & Underwood)

INTERACTIVE | The earlier presidents lived in boarding homes. Some lived in hotels. Others lived in mansions that became embassies. A look at the residences of the presidents.

Monkey Cage: Ranking the U.S. presidents

As snow arrives, D.C. area braces for biggest snowstorm this winter

As snow arrives, D.C. area braces <br /> for biggest snowstorm this winter

WEATHER GANG | Thanks to the low, low temperatures, the snow is sticking immediately.

Snow expected to taper off Tuesday morning

SchoolCast and FedCast for Tuesday

Danish shootings echo French attacks

Danish shootings echo French attacks

The similarities in Copenhagen to the Paris attacks left many to wonder if Europe has entered a new era.

Denmark mourns victims of deadly attacks

Ranking the 2016 Republican field? Keep an eye on Ted Cruz.

Ranking the 2016 Republican field? Keep an eye on Ted Cruz.

MONDAY FIX | Think of the Republican field as a series of lanes. In this race, there are four of them.

Readers respond to Rand Paul’s statements about college degree

FACT CHECKER | Readers either loved or hated our most recent fact check of Sen. Rand Paul.

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MEXICO NEWS

Image Credit

Mexican officials said Monday that two worn-out bolts on a gas tanker truck broke, causing a leak that resulted in a hospital explosion that killed five people last month

Thirty-two people from the United States and Mexico are accused of running a multistate gold-for-cash scheme that laundered more than $100 million in U.S. profits for Mexico's powerful Sinaloa drug cartel, a complaint unsealed this week in federal court in Chicago says.
A revolt by local police who barricaded themselves inside a station for nearly two weeks in a labor protest erupted in a clash that wounded least five federal agents in southern Mexico on Friday.

Official: At least 16 dead in Mexico bus-train crash

A passenger bus and a freight train collided at a grade crossing in northern Mexico on Friday, killing at least 16 people and injuring 22, a Mexican official said.

A U.N. commission reported Friday that disappearances are widespread in Mexico and authorities are often involved, most notoriously in the case of 43 students who went missing last fall, allegedly at the hands of local police.
A noted Mexican-American scholar and civil rights advocate whose name graces educational institutions in Texas and California but is virtually unknown in his hometown of Albuquerque is on track to receive the honor from a New Mexico school.
An 11-year-old Mexican boy who had portions of a massive tumor removed in New Mexico is living comfortably in an Albuquerque suburb with his family as he prepares for more treatment.
Mexico's attorney general's office on Monday questioned assertions by an Argentine-led team of forensics experts who expressed doubts about the government's conclusion that 43 missing college students were all killed and their bodies burned.
Experts hired by the victims' families have publicly questioned the government's conclusions.
The lowest oil prices in nearly six years couldn't have come at a worse time for Mexico, which last year opened up oil-sector investment to private companies for the first time in decades.
Alejandro Altamirano from Durango, Mexico, has called New Mexico home for a dozen years, and it's where his two U.S.-born daughters are being raised. But the 36-year-old dairy farmworker fears he will be forced into the shadows if he loses his driver's license.
A team of Argentine forensics experts is questioning Mexico's probe of the disappearance of 43 students, saying that the evidence doesn't support the government's conclusion and that it should be allowed to investigate all theories.
A Mexican federal judge threw out a five-year, money-laundering sentence for Sandra Avila Beltran, ordering the immediate release of the "Queen of the Pacific" for her alleged role as a liaison between Mexican and Colombian drug cartels.

McDonald's subsidiary in Mexico is apologizing for a Facebook post that was seen as trashing tamales, Mexico's corn-dough treat.

Remittances sent home by Mexicans living abroad rebounded by 7.8 percent last year after falling in 2013, Mexico's central bank said Tuesday.

Red and purple blossoms with fat, opium-filled bulbs blanket the remote creek sides and gorges of the Filo Mayor mountains in the southern state of Guerrero.

Mexican human rights groups asked the U.N. Committee on Enforced Disappearances on Tuesday to establish a special rapporteur for the country amid continuing consternation over the disappearance of 43 students at the hands of police.

Mexico has made a priority of passing laws against forced disappearances and perfecting a database to track missing people, the country's permanent representative to the U.N. in Geneva said Monday.

Mexico said Friday it will cut government spending by $8.4 billion this year because of a drop in revenues due to declining oil prices.

It was the sort of scene that plays out thousands of times a day across Mexico City: A tanker truck laden with propane rumbled down a crowded street, pulled up at a hospital and began to pump gas into its storage tanks.
International human rights groups on Wednesday questioned the Mexican government's official account of the disappearance of 43 college students last fall in the southern state of Guerrero.
Investigators are now certain that 43 college students missing since September were killed and incinerated after they were seized by police in southern Guerrero state, the Mexican attorney general said Tuesday.
President Enrique Pena Nieto faced new questions about his personal assets Wednesday after a report that he purchased a home from a businessman whose company won public works contracts worth millions of dollars.

Survivors recall panic before Mexico City hospital blast

Inside the maternity hospital on the western edge of Mexico City, concern quickly turned to panic as the sour smell of propane seeped in and a vapor cloud grew at the emergency room's entrance. The crew of a gas tanker truck outside began yelling: "Call the firefighters! And tell people to get out!"

People in the hamlet of Santa Ursula began to worry when the logging started. In a few short weeks, more than a mile of densely forested riverbank was stripped from the Arroyo Sal to make way for heavy dredging equipment.

A Mexican party isn't complete without a piñata, and Melesio Vicente Flores and Cecilia Albarran Gonzalez have spent the last 25 years making high-end versions of the papier-mache figures to later be stuffed with candies and broken open with a stick or club.

A Frenchwoman who became a cause celebre in her country after she was jailed for kidnapping in Mexico is suing a former Mexican president, other ex-officials and a major TV network, her lawyer said Monday.
In the underworld of illegal drug trafficking, identical twins Pedro and Margarito Flores rose from middling Chicago dealers to partners of Mexico's most notorious cartel lord, eventually building a nearly $2 billion franchise that spanned much of North America.
The body of a journalist who was abducted by armed men three weeks ago has been found in eastern Mexico, authorities said Sunday, adding that a former police officer has confessed to carrying out the crime allegedly at the request of the town's mayor.

Bombardier cutting 1,000 jobs in Mexico, Kansas

Bombardier says it's going to cut about 1,000 employees from its Learjet business in 2015, affecting sites in Mexico and the United States.

Investigations of abductions in Mexico declined 18 percent last year, Mexico's national chief of anti-kidnapping efforts said Wednesday in crediting better state and federal coordination

The body of a missing 20-year-old college student has been found in the waters off Mexico by his father, who was searching for him from a plane.

U.S. Border Patrol agents shot and killed a man who had driven through a West Texas checkpoint without stopping for inspection, Customs and Border Protection said Friday.

Commuters in Mexico City showed off their underwear on Sunday by taking part in the annual "No Pants Subway Ride."

Maduro criticizes visit by 3 former Latin American leaders

President Nicolas Maduro on Friday blasted a weekend visit to Venezuela by the former leaders of Mexico, Chile and Colombia, accusing them of inadvertently lending support to extremist groups trying to oust him from power.
A Mexican court has ordered the recapture of a convicted drug lord sentenced to 40 years for the killing of a U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent.
Mexico detains new suspect in disappearance of 43 students

A purported drug cartel hit man has been arrested in connection with the disappearance and alleged killing of 43 college students in southern Mexico in September, authorities said Friday.

Top leaders of Mexico's Sinaloa cartel smuggled huge amounts of methamphetamine and other drugs to the United States, according to indictments unsealed Friday that reflect the organization's recent success dominating criminal activity on California's southern border.
The amount of marijuana seized at the Mexican border has fallen nearly 40 percent since 2011.
A former South Florida man has been arrested in Mexico 37 years after failing to surrender for a 10-month prison sentence.

Mexican mayor's wife to be tried for gang ties

The wife of the former mayor of a Mexican city where 43 students disappeared will be tried on organized crime charges.
Mexico has begun testing unmanned drones that could help it save the critically endangered vaquita marina, the world's smallest porpoise, which is threatened by illegal fishing in the upper Sea of Cortez.
For Mexicans living in the U.S. illegally and hoping to stay in the country under President Barack Obama's new immigration policy, things just got one step simpler.
Mexico's dominant telephone company says it will oppose a nearly $1 million fine imposed by regulators for the company's purportedly commercial alliance with a pay TV provider.

Aztec app brings historic Mexico codex into the digital age

A 16th century document considered one of the most important primary sources on the Aztecs of pre-Columbian Mexico went digital Thursday with a new app that aims to spur research and discussion.

Groups sue over Mexican wolf-reintroduction program changes

Conservationists sued the federal government Friday over changes to a reintroduction program for the endangered Mexican gray wolf.

This city on the border with California has for a fourth time blocked a gay couple from marrying in defiance of an order from Mexico's Supreme Court, the men's lawyer said Friday.

One of Mexico's most important and influential journalists of the past half century, Julio Scherer Garcia, died Wednesday at the age of 88, reported Proceso, the newsmagazine he founded.
Mr. Scherer, 88, founded the newsmagazine Proceso and helped expose political scandals
The governor of the southern Mexico state of Guerrero has asked prosecutors to drop charges against a U.S. citizen who returned to her home town to lead a vigilante movement.
Michoacan militias that were formed to fight drug cartels are now having shootouts with each other and the police
Mexico's state oil company wants to import about 100,000 barrels of light U.S. crude a day to mix with this country's heavier oil as a way to improve refinery processes.
Mexican authorities say 10 bodies and 11 severed heads have been discovered in clandestine graves in the troubled southern state of Guerrero.
Mexican authorities held 13 police officers for investigation Thursday in the disappearance of kidnapped journalist Moises Sanchez and awaited the results of DNA tests on a body found in the area to determine if it is him.
D.C. taxicab drivers have company in their complaints about a uniform paint scheme. In Mexico, officials have decreed all cabs be pink.
President Barack Obama embarked on a new year of foreign policy by welcoming Mexico's embattled president to the White House Tuesday, seeking help to jump start a new U.S. approach to immigration, Cuba and trade.
President Enrique Peña Nieto praised President Obama's executive order on undocumented immigrants.

Obama, Mexico's president discuss cartels, border security

© 1996-2010 The Washington Post Company

LE MONDE

Qui est Hervé Falciani, le cauchemar de HSBC ?

LE MONDE | 09.02.2015  Par Fabrice Lhomme et Gérard Davet

Cet homme-là est un opportuniste, bien plus qu’un être multiple. Hervé Falciani peut certes endosser différents rôles, se complaire dans un langage abscons, pour mieux se cacher, peut-être, mais il a su, surtout, nager en eaux troubles, rebondir à chaque épreuve, profiter de toute possibilité. Il a été successivement informaticien, détrousseur de données sensibles, chevalier blanc, mythomane, manipulateur, lanceur d’alerte, puis victime du système, allez vous y retrouver. Mais Hervé Falciani est d’abord, et cela, personne ne peut lui enlever, le pivot de l’incroyable affaire HSBC. Son géniteur. Après cinq années d’enquête, la lecture de milliers d’archives confidentielles, de témoignages inédits, Le Monde peut vous narrer la vraie vie de Falciani, le cauchemar vivant de la banque HSBC Private Bank.

Plus, ICI

HSBC, un écrin sur mesure pour le gotha du diamant

Les très protégés clients mystères de HSBC

« Nous publions les noms des personnalités dont la fraude est manifeste » 53

ICIJ : qui se cache derrière cette machine à scoops ?

© Le Monde.fr

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Mexico’s President Calls for Investigation of Ties with Contractors

Watchdog Will Investigate Contractors That Sold Homes to Peña Nieto and First Lady

Copyright ©2015 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Logo

Friday, February 6, 2015

61 bodies found in abandoned Mexican crematorium

Acapulco (Mexico), Feb 6 (IANS/EFE) A total of 61 bodies have been found at an abandoned crematorium in Acapulco, in the Mexican state of Guerrero, where in September last year 43 students went missing, officials from the public prosecutor's office reported Friday.

The discovery was made after residents from the neighbouring areas called the authorities, who reached the crematorium and recovered the human remains in forensic vehicles, as confirmed by Spanish news agency EFE.

According to the sources, the foul smell from the bodies caught the attention of nearby residents who alerted the authorities Thursday.

Apparently, the crematorium, the Cremaciones El Pacifico, had been abandoned about a year ago.

More, HERE.

Actualités
mardi 27 janvier, Sainte Angèle

Florence Cassez demande 36 millions de dollars au Mexique

Publié le 27/01/2015

International

Florence Cassez, détenue pendant sept ans au Mexique pour enlèvement, séquestration, délinquance organisée et détention d’armes à l’usage exclusif des forces armées, a entamé une action en justice auprès de la Cour suprême mexicaine pour obtenir 36 millions de dollars (environ 32 millions d’euros) de dommages et intérêts.

Selon l’avocat de la jeune femme, Me José Patiño Hurtado invité sur radio MVS, l’action en justice, lancée vendredi 23 janvier, visait l’ex-président mexicain Felipe Calderon (2006-2012), son ancien secrétaire particulier, l’actuel sénateur Roberto Gil, ainsi que les anciens ministres de la Sécurité publique, Genaro Garcia Luna, et de la Justice, Daniel Cabeza de Vaca. « Nous présentons une plainte pour dommage moral envers Florence Cassez, atteinte à ses sentiments, à sa réputation et à son honneur. Ils ont tué sa vie », a déclaré Me José Patiño Hurtado, qui a également estimé que l’ancien président Calderon, comme les autres personnalités visées, « était en charge et n'a pas empêché que soit commis l'illicite » contre Florence Cassez.

Une arrestation mise en scène de la police

L’action vise également la chaîne de télévision Televisa et un de ses présentateurs vedettes, Carlos Loret de Mola. Ils sont accusés d’avoir présenté comme une arrestation en direct une mise en scène de la police.

Plus, ICI

REUTERS

Security chief in violent Mexican state steps down

MEXICO CITY Thu Jan 22, 2015

(Reuters) - Mexico's Interior Ministry said on Thursday that a top security official appointed to restore order in a restive western state has stepped down, a few weeks after new outbreaks of violence.

Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong said the federal government's security commissioner for Michoacan state, Alfredo Castillo, would take on a new role in the government, without giving any more details on the reasons for his departure.

Castillo was appointed commissioner a year ago in a bid to crush a powerful drug gang known as the Knights Templar which had taken control of large swathes of Michoacan, and later became embroiled in bloody clashes with vigilante groups.

More, HERE.

Copyright



Mexico removes security envoy from troubled Michoacan

The Associated Press

January 22, 201

MORELIA, Mexico — The federal security commissioner appointed a little over a year ago for the troubled western state of Michoacan confirmed Thursday that he is being withdrawn by Mexico's government.

Security envoy Alfredo Castillo will be replaced by an army general, Felipe Gurrola, who will play a more limited role leading federal security forces in Michoacan, a largely agricultural state known for its limes and avocados but also social unrest and drug gang violence.

In a speech, Castillo gave a chilling description of how completely the pseudo-religious Knights Templar cartel once controlled everything from local police forces to industry, commerce and even everyday chores in what threatened to become a "failed state."

More, HERE.

Copyright

Toronto Sun

Drug gang members ate human hearts: Mexican government

Gabriel Stargardter, Reuters; January 06, 2015

MEXICO CITY - A vicious Mexican drug gang forced some members to eat the hearts of murder victims as part of a gruesome initiation rite to root out infiltrators, a government security official said on Tuesday, citing witness testimony.

For much of the past year, Michoacan, a mountainous, agricultural state in western Mexico, has been ravaged by fighting between drug gang henchmen and vigilantes who took up arms against the cartels but have since splintered into violent factions.

A mid-December shootout between two rival groups that killed 11 people has reignited fears the government is failing to control the state after flooding it with federal troops and pressing vigilantes into a fledgling rural police force.

More, HERE.

Copyright © 2015 All rights reserved

The Toronto Sun is a member of Canoe Sun Media Urban Newspapers.

Yahoo News

Security on agenda as embattled Mexican president visits Obama

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico's embattled President Enrique Pena Nieto will discuss security and justice with U.S. President Barack Obama in Washington next week amid public anger about how he has handled a probe into the apparent massacre of 43 trainee teachers.

Pena Nieto's standing has been battered by a string of massive street protests following the abduction and likely murder of 43 students by a drug gang working with corrupt police in the southwestern city of Iguala on the night of Sept. 26.

More, HERE.

Yahoo News Network

KREM2

December 31, 2014

VIDEO: Toddler fatally shot Blackfoot, ID mom at Hayden Walmart

Photo of Veronica Rutledge from her Facebook account.
Photo of Veronica Rutledge from her Facebook account. Family members granted KREM 2 permission to use the photo.(Photo: KREM)

HAYDEN, Idaho—A toddler shot and killed a Walmart shopper Tuesday morning in what deputies described as an "accident."

The woman was later identified by authorities said Veronica Rutledge from Blackfoot, Idaho. The father-in-law of Walmart shooting victim spoke with KREM 2 News Tuesday night. He called the shooting "tragic." He added the family "lost a beautiful, loving mother."

Walmart employees evacuated the Hayden store around 10:20 a.m. following the gunshot.
Deputies with the Kootenai County Sheriff's Office responded to the scene and found a 29-year-old woman dead inside the store.

Rutledge was shopping with four kids, when her two-year-old son reached into her purse, accessed her concealed 9mm Smith & Wesson M&P Shield semi-automatic handgun and accidentally discharged the weapon, according deputies. Authorities said the toddler was seated in the shopping cart when the gun was discharged. The woman and children were in the back of the store near the electronics area when the deadly shooting happened.

The bullet struck Mrs. Rutledge in the head, killing her instantly.

More, HERE.

© 2015 KREM, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, Inc.

GLOBAL RESEARCH

Boko Haram texte

The objectives of the US military presence in Africa are well documented: counter Chinese influence and control strategic locations and natural resources including oil reserves. This was confirmed more than 8 years ago by the US State Department

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Canada: Harper Government Relies on Torture Evidence, Say Three Professional Organizations

By Global Research, February 05, 2015

In the wake of the December, 2014 release of the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee’s report on CIA torture, Prime Minister Harper said the report “has nothing to do whatsoever with the government of Canada.”

However, David Long, 9/11 survivor and creator of a petition submitted to Parliament December 3, 2014, disputes this claim.

The office of Steven Blaney, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, recently rejected this request for a Parliamentary review of the September 11, 2001 attacks.

The 1427 petitioners are dismayed that the key document setting forth the U.S. government’s account of the 9/11 events, the 2004 9/11 Commission Report, is based largely on testimony obtained through torture.

Their case was presented in a widely-viewed press conference held at Parliament December 10th by three academic organizations –  Rethink911.ca,  Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth and the9/11 Consensus Panel,

In his brief response to the petitioners, Mr. Blaney stated:

“The Government will not tolerate the waste of taxpayer dollars by studying conspiracy theories.”

More, HERE.

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Police Murders and the Criminalization of Protest in America

By Andre Damon; Global Research, February 01, 2015

On Friday, New York Police Department Commissioner William J. Bratton announced the formation of a 350-member paramilitary police unit specializing in “disorder control and counter-terrorism.” Bratton made clear the new unit would be used to crack down on political opposition. 

In his announcement, Bratton explicitly equated peaceful protests, protected under the First Amendment of the US constitution, with acts of terrorism and mass murder. The commissioner said the new unit will be “designed for dealing with events like our recent protests, or incidents like Mumbai or what just happened in Paris,” referring to the 2008 Mumbai, India attacks that killed 164 people and the recent shooting of 11 people at the offices of the French weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo
The police commissioner made clear that members of the unit would be heavily armed. “Long rifles and machine guns… are unfortunately sometimes necessary,” he said.
The announcement by Bratton, speaking for the Democratic administration of Mayor Bill de Blasio, makes clear that the official response to peaceful protests in Ferguson, Missouri and other cities is not to rein in police violence, but to intensify it, along with a further militarization of the police to deal with the broader social and political unrest to come.

More, HERE.
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Violence Intensifies in Mexico as Authorities Unearth 10 Headless Bodies

By Jake Dean; Global Research, January 13, 2015

Mexican police have unearthed ten decapitated bodies and eleven heads in unmarked graves Tuesday near the city of Chilapa de Alvarez, 31 miles east of Guerrero state’s capital, Chilpancingo. The bodies were found spread throughout six clandestine graves with their hands tied and showing signs of torture. The heads of the victims were discovered in another grave inside four plastic bags.

Prosecutors have yet to identify the victims and are attempting to find the eleventh body and to ascertain if the heads belong to the corpses found in the graves. An anonymous-tip off alerted the police to the graves. The remains have been taken to the Forensic Medical Service of Chilpancingo for identification.

The brutal methods used against these victims are all too familiar.

More, HERE.
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How Israeli High-Tech Security Firms Are Turning the U.S.-Mexico Border into a “New Kind of Hell”

U.S. borderlands are laboratories for nightmarish innovations.

More, HERE.
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International Court Calls on Mexico to Ban Genetically Modified Corn

By Ethan A. Huff;Global Research, January 16, 2015
GMO-Concept-Corn-Spelled-Out-Husk
Mexico is desperately trying to avoid a bioterrorism takeover by Big GMO, which is insistent upon ushering in genetically modified (GM) maize to replace the dozens of native corn varieties already grown throughout the country.

The Mexican Chapter of the Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal has issued an urgent plea to the Mexican government to once and for all ban all plantings of GM maize in order to avoid catastrophic losses to the “center of origin and diversity of this staple crop.”

The ruling, which came after the Tribunal spent three years gathering evidence from more than 1,000 organizations on GMO safety and effectiveness, warns that GM maize threatens to contaminate Mexico’s roughly 60 native corn varieties. More than just a staple crop, corn is a cultural treasure of Mexico, and because there is already a natural diversity of it, corn grows exceptionally well without the need for genetic alterations.

More, HERE.
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Obama Backs Beleaguered Mexican President Peña Nieto

“NAFTA-Land Security”: How Canada and Mexico Have Become Part of the U.S. Policing Regime

By Paul Ashby; Global Research, December 04, 2014

National Guard PFC monitors one of dozens of cameras on the border with Mexico at the Border Patrol’s Communications Center in Arizona (U.S. Army / Creative Commons)

During this summer’s child migrant crisis and the accompanying frenzy around “security” along the U.S.-Mexico boundary, a spotlight was shone on Mexico’s role in protecting the U.S. “homeland.” It helped illuminate what Washington considers the United States’ territorial boundaries: those of the countries associated with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In other words, the territories of Canada and Mexico are part of the U.S. policing regime, under a regional security framework we might call “NAFTA-land Security.”

Evidence of this emerged in July when a Congressional hearing featured a discussion on, as Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) put it, “what Mexico is actually doing to help us” regarding the unauthorized movement of Central American children. Some lawmakers and officials hinted that insufficient efforts by Mexican authorities made possible the unwanted migrants’ northward movement through Mexico.

In response, administration officials pointed to Mexican President Peña Nieto’s new southern border strategy, one that, as Todd Miller has written, involves the exportation of the U.S. border policing model to Mexico.

More, HERE.

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More Beheaded Bodies Discovered in Southern Mexico

Disappeared Students in Mexico: Global Struggle for Ayotzinapa Captures World’s Attention

By Telesur Global Research, November 22, 2014
More than 200 actions were carried out Thursday, coinciding with Mexico’s Day of Revolution.

A student’s skin was peeled over his head in a gruesome and clear display of a narco-state murder. The photo of the murder, which took place in the drug war-torn state of Guerrero some seven weeks ago, quickly went viral on the Internet. On the same day, five other people were killed and some 43 more students went “missing” in the small town of Ayotzinapa. In a press conference addressing the abuses more than one month after the disappearance of the students, who hailed from a rural-based and selective teachers college in Guerrero, an Attorney General presumed them “dead” without presenting any evidence to substantiate his conclusion. The nation’s leading prosecutor said he was “tired” by the end of the press conference, much to the chagrin of those who sympathized with the plight of the parents of the disappeared students.

Those happenings have served as the sparks that have ignited the nation’s ire to a feverish boiling point in one of the largest countries and economies of Latin America. Mexico has witnessed near daily and nation-wide actions of resistance. Since the disappearance of the “normalistas” (students training to be teachers) on September 26, the country has been brimming with mass marches, candle-light vigils, university-campus and labor-union-led strikes, occupations of official and university buildings, riot police-led arrests of demonstrators, property destruction of official buildings, sit-ins, panels ruminating over the ills of narco-state violence and international bridge closings.

While the 43 students, who are technically still missing due to the lack of any corpses being forensically tied to the students, were what clearly catalyzed the movement’s inception, much of the country has long been weary of the systematic problem of disappearances and the eery official impunity which has often surrounded them. Nothing less than some 24,000 disappearances, over the course of the last three years alone, account for official estimates. Other analysts estimate the actual total as being far higher than that.

The Mayor of Iguala and his wife, dubbed as the “imperial couple,” were arrested several weeks ago, as teleSUR previously reported. At the time of their arrest, speculation was that their detention may produce valuable clues that could help solve the case of the disappeared students. However, no significant advances have been made in the case since the detention of the couple. At the time of their arrest, the on-the-run couple were fugitives from the law and in hiding when authorities busted them at a rented home in Itzapalapa, Mexico City.

More, HERE.

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Angry Protests Sweep Mexico after Government Says Missing Students are Dead


Global Research, November 11, 2014
Angry protests swept Mexico over the weekend in the wake of a press conference Friday in which Jesús Murillo Karam, the country’s attorney general, declared that 43 missing teaching students from the Ayotzinapa Normal School in the state of Guerrero are all dead. Murrillo based this evaluation on confessions by gang members that they had killed the students, who were handed over to them by the police, and then burned their bodies.
Demonstrations in both Mexico City and the Guerrero capital of Chilpancingo saw clashes with police and attacks on government buildings. In the capital, a small group of demonstrators launched an attack on the historic National Palace in the city’s main square (El Zócalo). They first used metal security barriers to ram the building’s wooden door and then doused it with gasoline and set it on fire.
Some demonstrators questioned why it took police so long to respond to these acts, suggesting that they could have been the work of provocateurs.

More, HERE.

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More than 100,000 March in Mexico City over Disappeared Students

By Rafael Azul; Global Research, November 07, 2014

A mass protest march of more than 100,000 students, teachers, education workers and ordinary citizens took place in Mexico City on Wednesday, November 5, in solidarity with the 43 missing teaching students, normalistas, of the Ayotzinapa Normal School, who have been missing for over 40 days.

This was the third mass demonstration and by far the largest and angriest. Many of the participants directed their anger at President Enrique Peña Nieto, demanding that he resign. One protest sign denounced him “for corruption, betraying the nation, ineptitude,” calling him a “repressor and assassin.”
Others carried signs that said, “It was the State.” Leading the march were students from Mexico City’s National Autonomous Metropolitan University (UNAM), the Polytechnic Institute, rural teaching colleges, and Iberian-American University, who all had joined a massive nationwide 72-hour student strike.

At Mexico City’s Constitution Square (the Zócalo), many thousands greeted the protesters as they arrived after the two-and-a-half-hour march from the president’s mansion (Los Pinos). At the mass rally, family members of the 43 disappeared students spoke to the demonstrators. None of the major political parties (the governing PRI, the PAN, the PRD, the Greens) were involved in the protest.

More, HERE.
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Mexico Disarms Local Police in Missing Students’ City

By Press TV,Global Research, October 07, 2014
Mexican federal forces have disarmed the entire police department in the southern city of Iguala after its officers were accused of collaborating with a gang behind the recent disappearance of 43 students.
On Monday, the government’s new federal police unit took over security in Iguala, located some 200 kilometers (125 miles) south of the capital, Mexico City.

The federal unit was tasked with holding order in the city and helping search for the students who went missing last month after a deadly police shooting.

The deployment in the southern violence-stricken state of Guerrero came after President Enrique Pena Nieto vowed to establish justice and bring an end to corruption in the country.

Pena Nieto said he had dispatched the federal forces to Iguala to “find out what happened and apply the full extent of the law to those responsible.”The decision to disarm Iguala’s police corps came just days after 28 charred bodies were found in a mass grave on the outskirts of the city.

State prosecutor Inaky Blanco has said the recovered bodies probably belonged to the missing students. State officials also say it will take up to two weeks to receive the results of DNA tests to identify the corpses.

The students, all trainee teachers, went missing following a police attack on September 26 against a protest over teachers’ rights.

According to Blanco, state investigators have obtained video footage showing local police arresting a number of students during the clashes and taking them away.

Prosecutors said the Guerreros Unidos drug gang also participated in the police shooting that left six people dead and 25 others wounded.

Mexican authorities have already arrested 22 officers and issued arrest warrants for Iguala mayor Jose Luis Albarca and his security chief over the deadly incident.

More, HERE.
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Militarization and Political Crisis in Mexico

Is Mexico a Narco-State?

By Michael Werbowski;Global Research, May 31, 2010

Mexico - In the wake of Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s recent state visit to the U.S and Canada, a burning question remains without any clear answer.

2010 is historically significant for Mexico. It is its bi-centennial year of independence ( in 1810 the country began to break free from Spanish imperial tutelage) and perhaps more significantly is is also the centenary year of the 1910 Mexican revolution. There is little to celebrate though. The country this year, is still reeling from the vortex of drug-trafficking crimes, the global economic down-turn and the fall-out from the histrionics and panic induced by the H1N1-Swine flu “pandemic” of 2009.

Mexico after a decade of the centre-right almost “corporatist” PAN ( National Action Party) party’s rule, ( as in 2000, the first PAN candidate won the presidency, Vincente Fox) has been practically “Balkanised”. And as a result, it is now faced with a crippling fragmentation of the federation itself, due mainly to territorial battles or “turf wars” going on between rival drug cartels, which operate almost with impunity in many Mexican states. Possibly, the most fascinating and insightful read on this phenomenal topic is: Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State? . While I was pondering over the question raised by the book’s title , I was somewhat astonished to read in (despite what I witnessed first hand in Mexico) the concluding chapter, a rather reassuring reply. That basically, Mexico is far from becoming another Somalia, Pakistan or Haiti.

More, HERE.
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Destabilizing Mexico

By Rev. Richard Skaff; Global Research, March 13, 2009

Attorney General Eric Holder stated on February 25, 2009 that Mexican drug cartels pose a national security threat, and issued a direct warning to these cartels that they will be destroyed.

The warning came as the attorney general and acting Drug Enforcement Administration chief Michele Leonhart announced the completion of the final phase of DEA’s “Operation Xcellerator,” which targeted the Sinaloa cartel, a major western Mexico drug operation that has been expanding its reach into the United States . [1].

Meanwhile, the blood shed in the Mexican cities continues to be extensive and has expanded its tentacles of violence to various cities in Mexico. Lawlessness, corruption, murders, decapitations, and kidnappings have taken the Mexican cities by a storm, giving rise to a new radical group calling itself the Juarez Citizens Command that is threatening to strike back against lawlessness that has gripped Mexico for a long time. The group stated that they are going to strike back by killing one criminal a day until order and peace is restored. Similar groups are popping up all across Mexico. [2].

In its last report, the US Department of justice disclosed that 17.2 billion dollars in cash entered Mexico in only the past two years as a result of money laundering operation in their country. The report advised that Mexico and Colombia are the principal destinations of narco resources that operate in the US and that “the laundering of drug money is a global industry” with transnational organizations present in various countries. [2].

According to a DEA undercover operative, the Mexican drug cartels have gained more and more of the American market. They have grown bolder in their attempts to expand their operations in Mexico and the United States . They now control the ruling party in Mexico and operate the biggest drug business on earth right here in the USA . [2].

Mexico’s drug and violence problem now engulfs the entire country, inundating cities along the U.S.-Mexico border. The robust drug cartel reduced its position in the western mountains, and lunged into the heart of national power in Mexico City. The capital that was once relatively immune to such contemptuous boldness of drug killings has become the scene of multiple assassinations of high-ranking federal police officials in about a week. More than 1,000 people have been killed in Mexico this year in drug-related violence and about 6,290 in 2008. [11].

More, HERE.
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MORE MEXICO ARTICLES, BY GLOBAL RESEARCH, HERE

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I N T E R N A T I O N A L

“Je Suis CIA” By Larry Chin, January 17, 2015
cia

Since 9/11, the imperial playbook has consisted of time-tested tactic: the false flag operation. Carry out or facilitate a spectacular atrocity. Blame it on the enemy of choice. Issue a lie-infested official narrative, and have the corporate media repeat the lie. Rile up militant crowds, stoke the hatred, wage war with the public stamp of approval.

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Ali awakes armless

Massive terrorist attacks were hatched back soon after the pretext of cinematographic ‘terrorist’ attacks in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001. The people of Afghanistan were first in line, that winter bombing and invasion had been planned for some months before smoke billowed up from the Twin Towers.

Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies, Spring 2014

MEXICO: Center for Latin American Studies, University of California, Berkeley

Communities Up in Arms

Lorena Ojeda

 

The emergence of armed self-defense groups in the state of Michoacán has catapulted the region to the top of the Mexican federal government’s list of security concerns. Not all of these groups are alike, however. While the indigenous P’urhépecha community guards and the mestizo self-defense groups share many common grievances, they have arisen in response to different histories and different contemporary circumstances.

Concentrated in central and northwestern Michoacán, the P’urhépecha home area is divided into four sub-regions: the Sierra P’urhépecha; the Lake Pátzcuaro basin; the Ciénega de Zacapu; and the Cañada de los Once Pueblos. Disputes about land ownership and access to natural resources have long made the region a hot spot for both intra- and inter-community violence. Although agrarian conflicts in the region date back to the colonial era, they were exacerbated by the agrarian reform initiatives following the Mexican Revolution, in large part because the distribution of lands to one community almost always impacted the interests of its neighbors. The reforms resulted in bloody clashes that sowed distrust between the communities. To further complicate matters, this infighting made it easier for outside interest groups to gain a foothold in the area. Revolutionary and post-revolutionary bandits devastated indigenous villages, taking advantage of their divisions.  It was from this complex stew of conflicts that the community guards emerged.

More, HERE.

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The Berkeley Blog

Not everyone mourns for Ayotzinapa’s students

Forty-three student teachers (normalistas) disappeared on the evening of September 26 in the municipality of Iguala, in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero. The incident has attracted national and international attention, and it has also generated a wealth of speculation and misinformation. The daily reports concerning the discovery of numerous mass graves have further muddied the waters; the only silver lining, such as it is, in these reports is that the missingnormalistas do not appear to have been buried in any of the discovered grave sites. The contrast between the hope that the normalistas might still be alive, and the despair of living in a country where mass graves can seemingly be uncovered by simply kicking over a few stones, is striking.

But perhaps the most depressing aspect of this story is the indifference of some Mexicans that have even attempted to argue that the normalistas somehow deserved their fate because of their “rebellious attitudes” or their “delinquent” appearance. Thus, a society already divided by social class, skin color, linguistic differences, clothing styles, the size of one’s bank account, zip codes, and a host of other frivolous matters has found new ways of demarcating distinct types of Mexicans: “good” versus “bad”; those that receive justice versus those that do not; and those that can versus those that do not even deserve to try.

Meanwhile, Mexico’s political parties are only interested in representing and advancing their own interests. The left has lost its identity in its efforts to reach power. The right, which is more concerned with maintaining the appearance of good behavior, has shrouded itself in silence and indifference. And the ruling party’s principal preoccupation is the next election cycle and the perpetuation of its political dynasty, not the needs of Mexico’s citizens.

The Ayotzinapa case reveals the deterioration of Mexico’s political and social spheres. The missing normalistas are poor, indigenous or mestizo (mixed-race), and brown-skinned. Their hair is straight, they are not particularly tall, and they speak with the accents of the countryside. Simply put, they are Mexicans. But their surnames – Tizapa, Jacinto, Patolzin, Ascencio, Tlatempa, and Lauro, among others – are not among Mexico’s famous, and they are more likely to be found in the country’s seemingly infinite number of mass graves, as opposed to a social club or the halls of the stock market. The divide between Mexicans has become so great that some are not even moved by the heartrending pain experienced by the parents whose sons are missing.

The Ayotzinapa case has quickly become symbolic of the daily disappearances and murders that occur in Mexico, and of the mass graves that vastly outnumber the number of roads, hospitals, universities, and science and technology centers that have been built in recent years.

Throughout the world, many are pressuring the Mexican government to resolve the matter and bring those responsible to justice. Hundreds of thousands of Mexicans have taken to the streets demanding that the normalistas be found, while also calling out the shamelessness of the governments, political parties, and dominant social classes that allowed the disappearances to occur. But there are millions of Mexicans, and the majority of them appear to have been stunned into silence by the Mexican apocalypse, or have chosen to express their outrage safely behind closed doors.

COMMENTS

NOTE: Professor Lorena Ojeda authorized Security Corner in Mexico to republish this article. She is a visiting scholar in the Department of History at UC Berkeley and a professor of history at Mexico's Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo. Her work at Berkeley is supported by the Fulbright García-Robles and CONACYT grants. Ojeda recently published the article "Communities Up in Arms," on the emergence of armed self-defense groups in the state of Michoacán, in the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies.
ed.

NPR

By Eyder Peralta; February 03, 2015

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto is asking a government watchdog agency to look into the purchase of homes by himself, his wife, and his finance minister from contractors who were then awarded lucrative construction projects by the government.

Critics have charged that the Peña Nieto government faced conflicts of interest because of the transactions. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports Peña Nieto also announced anti-corruption initiatives.

She filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Peña Nieto announced the investigation and new transparency measures for federal officials, including asset reporting requirements. Taking no questions from reporters, Peña Nieto said he had done nothing wrong.

"'I am conscious that the events generated the appearance of something improper...something that in reality did not occur," the president said.

"Press reports revealed the first lady bought a luxury home from a well connected contractor who was part of a group that won a multi-billion dollar transportation contract. The president and finance minister also purchased homes from government contractors."

As we've reported, back in 2012, Peña Nieto's wife, the telenovela star Angélica Rivera, bought a home valued at $7 million from a contractor who was then included in a $3.7 billion contract to build a high speed train.

Under political pressure, Rivera sold the house and said she had done nothing wrong.

More, HERE.

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December 26, 2014, Scott Neuman

NPR's Carrie Kahn reports that the body of a kidnapped Catholic priest has been discovered after he was seized in the southern state of Guerrero earlier this week.

The body of Rev. Gregorio Lopez Gorostieta was found with a gunshot wound to the head, not far from the seminary where he lived near Ciudad Altamirano. Carrie says he is the third priest this year to be killed in Guerrero, where 43 students were kidnapped by corrupt police and presumably murdered by drug traffickers. Gorostieta is the first, however, to have been seized since the students disappeared in September.

More, HERE.

More MEXICO stories by NPR, HERE.

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November 19, 2014

Eyder Peralta

Amid rumblings about conflict of interest and corruption, Mexico's first lady says she will sell a multimillion-dollar home in one of the most glamorous areas of Mexico City.


In a YouTube video released late Tuesday, Angélica Rivera defiantly proclaims that she has "nothing to hide."
"I have worked all my life, and because of that I am an independent woman capable of building a patrimony with honesty," she said.
Rivera and her husband, President Enrique Peña Nieto, have been under heavy scrutiny lately: first, because of the way the government has handled the case of 43 students who went missing after they were detained by police, and then after Aristegui Noticias revealed that an opulent modern structure dubbed "The White House" and valued at $7 million was owned by a construction company awarded millions in government contracts.
As Aristegui explained, the house, which Rivera showed off in a glitzy spread in the royal-centric magazine ¡Hola!, was just another symbol of the "close relationship between Peña Nieto and Grupo Higa."
According to the investigation, Grupo Higa is owned by Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantú, who in the past rented out airplanes for the Peña Nieto's 2012 presidential campaign. The company, Aristegui reports, received millions of dollars in contracts in the state of Mexico when Peña Nieto was governor.
Once Peña Nieto was in the presidential palace, a subsidiary of Hinojosa's company was awarded part of a huge contract to build a high-speed train from Mexico City to Querétaro.
Just days before the report was published, Peña Nieto canceled the $3.7 billion contract.
More, HERE.

© 2014 NPR

Business Monitor International

Industry Forecast - Mexico Offers Strongest Banking Sector Growth Potential - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Latin America / Economy

Slowing economic activity will temper asset and loan growth in several Latin American economies throughout our five-year forecast period. In contrast, we see stronger banking sector growth prospect...

Read article

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Risk Summary - Mexico - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Mexico / Economy

Mexico's Short-Term Political Risk Rating (STPRR) remains unchanged from last month at 63.5, ranking 8th out of 17 Latin American countries scored, and 12.3 points below regional leader Chile. Mexi...

Read article

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Political Risk Analysis - Ruling PRI To Lose Support In Midterms Due To Iguala Crisis - JAN 2015

Mexico November 2014 / Mexico / Economy

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto's approval rating will continue to fall in the coming months, as the disappearance of 43 students in Iguala heightens concerns over security and corruption. This will have negative implications for the ruling Partido Institucional Revolucionario in the June 2015 mid-term elections, increasing the odds of a strong result by the main centre-right opposi...

READ FULL ARTICLE

© 2015 Business Monitor International

Al Jazeera America

Crude harvest: Selling Mexico's oil

VIDEO: Mexico may be hitting the perfect storm when it opens its energy resources to foreign investors.

30 Dec 2014

Against the backdrop of Mexico's ever-widening gap between rich and poor, growing violence, and stalled economy, President Enrique Pena Nieto has passed a series of economic reforms.

Under these reforms, Mexico's oil, which was expropriated from foreign interests 75 years ago, is now for sale to private, international companies.

Twenty years ago, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which opened Mexico up to trade with the US and Canada, led to the collapse of agriculture, and paved the way to the privatization of oil.

The operations of Mexico's state-owned oil company, Pemex, have never been entirely transparent, and communities have been crippled by oil disasters. For instance, in October 2013, the state of Tabasco experienced its worst oil disaster when a drill site exploded and burned for 55 days, contaminating the surrounding land and water. Villagers closest to the site say they are suffering from health problems and have lost their livestock. They say Pemex has never accepted responsibility for the accident, nor has it offered any compensation.

More, HERE.

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OPINION: Privatising Mexico's oil industry spells disaster

In the absence of strong state institutions, the privatisation of Mexico's oil industry will be disastrous.

30 Dec 2014, By

Edgardo Buscaglia is a Senior Law and Economics Scholar at Columbia University in New York and President of the Instituto de Accion Ciudadana in Mexico.

Who can deny that Mexico is one of the most admired cradles of civilisation, with its culture and history considered an integral part of the world's historical heritage. Yet, Mexico is also a country whose population for centuries has been raped by corrupt authoritarian governments; it is a country which has suffered domestic and regional conflicts leading to foreign interventions backing extractive business interests.

The 1910 Mexican Revolution brought together various groups calling for social justice. It was a natural reaction to centuries of foreign looting of Mexico's resources. One of the consequences of the Revolution was the decision by the

Mexican government to nationalise the immense reserves of oil in the 1930s.

However, it seems that Mexican politicians today have failed to learn a lesson from history. The administration of Mexican President Pena Nieto recently approved legal reforms which will make it possible once again for private firms to become the major players in the Mexican oil business.

More, HERE.

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Who's making money off the War on Drugs?

Disappearance of 43 students from Mexico spurred a national debate about the winners and losers in war on drugs.

Since the disappearance of 43 students from #Ayotzinapa school in Guerrero, Mexico, people around the world have taken to the streets to demand an end to drug-related crime and the close ties between drug cartels, police and political institutions. So if everybody's losing, who's winning?

The rebel spirit driving Mexico’s protests has deep roots

Analysis: Outrage over case of 43 missing students has helped unleash widespread discontent with a deep historical echo

Protests over missing students spread in Mexico

A chronology of the disappearance of 43 students from a teachers’ college in Mexico and its aftermath

Mexico’s church calls for government to change response to violence

Cardinal Norberto Rivera Carrera calls changes ‘necessary,’ says pope is monitoring case of 43 missing students

Cuba-US thaw is a win for Latin America

Analysis: Return of US-Cuban diplomatic relations will affect entire region and possibly isolate Venezuela

Latin America celebrates new US-Cuba era

Chile’s minister of foreign relations calls the Obama and Castro speeches the beginning of the end of the Cold War

VIDEO: Mexico's Nieto faces growing calls to resign

02 Dec 2014

President's second anniversary in office marred by protests as he and the government are accused of corruption.

With help from the Obama administration, Peña Nieto is brutally reshaping Mexican society

Through the story of one immigrant family, we explore the evolution of racism and migration in the US.

President Pena Nieto proposes changes to police force following uproar over presumed massacre of 43 students.

Ferguson: Lawmakers urge calm, offer few policy prescriptions

Analysis: Think riots have never caused change in America? Think again

Brown's parents vow to 'keep fighting' for justice

Protesters upset by Ferguson decision storm St. Louis City Hall

Confronting race and inequality in the US

Week before verdict, 12 killed by US law enforcement

Please click on HERE to get updated Al Jazeera, Mexico news

Drug trafficking organizations are rapidly splintering, but there€’s no end in sight to the violence

Topics:

Mexico

Drugs

Drug Cartels
The village warriors of Guerrero

Cocaine, heroin and avocados


Tens of thousands of people angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students are marching in Mexico City as part of another day of nationwide protests.

Protesters on Thursday waved blackened flags of Mexico and many chanted for the resignation of President Enrique Pena Nieto. "He will fall, he will fall, Pena Nieto will fall," they chanted.

Some protesters clashed with riot police near the city's international airport at the start of the day's demonstrations, burning tyres, throwing firebombs and launching firecrackers at police.
Thursday’s protest was the latest protest over the government's handling of a crime that has infuriated Mexicans fed up with corruption, impunity and a drug war that has left more than 100,000 people dead or missing since 2006.

The case has turned into the biggest challenge of Pena Nieto's nearly two-year-old presidency, on top of another scandal over a mansion his wife bought from a government contractor.
'Mexico is hurting'

The crisis erupted after the mayor of the city of Iguala allegedly ordered police to confront students on September 26, sparking a night of violence that left six people dead and 43 missing, authorities say.
Protesters angered by the presumed massacre of 43 students take to the streets for another day of demonstrations.

More, HERE.

Police officer fires on Mexico City students, inflaming tensions

Students had been planning for a Nov. 20 national strike in solidarity with 43 missing students from Guerrero

INSIDE STORY

VIDEO: Missing Mexico students: Who is responsible.

Protesters demand justice for missing 43 trainee teachers who are feared murdered in Mexico. To watch video click on HERE.

Mexico president pushes trade ties in China while protests rage at home

Peña Nieto's Beijing trip amid massive political crisis at home shows heavy bet on China ties as economic boost

Mexico missing student protesters burn state buildings

Protest movement has hit Guerrero'€™s tourism industry with vacationers canceling trips during busiest time of year.

Photos: In Acapulco, an angry demonstration over missing students

Students, peasants and others attempt to block the airport and clash with police.

Mexico leader travels to Asia amid rising unrest over missing students

Peña Nieto faces increased calls to resign as another presidential scandal emerged over the weekend

Mexico protesters set fire to National Palace over missing students

Gang members have confessed to killing the 43 missing students and dumping their charred remains in a landfill.

Gang members confess to mass killing of Mexico students

Charred human remains found in a dumpster are likely the students who disappeared on Sept. 26, Mexican authorities say.

Mexican army accepts criticism of human rights commission in killings

The defense department says, however, it doesn't agree with all findings of human rights commission on the June slayings.

Why have the most recent kidnappings in Mexico sparked such outrage?

The disappearance of 43 students in Mexico has triggered nationwide demonstrations for government accountability.

Thousands protest missing Mexico students despite mayor arrest

Public anger over student disappearances brings Mexico City to a standstill; full-blown crisis for President Peña Nieto.

Photos: Protests over 43 Guerrero students target government buildings

A city congress and buildings tied to the ruling party are trashed and burned.

The food producer has developed more than 480 varieties of wheat, upping production by an estimated 200 million tonnes.
Mexican official: CIA 'manages' drug trade

Spokesman for Chihuahua state says US agencies don't want to end drug trade, a claim denied by other Mexican officials

24 Jul 2012, by Chris Arsenault

Juarez, Mexico - The US Central Intelligence Agency and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers", a spokesman for the Chihuahua state government in northern Mexico has told Al Jazeera, instead "they try to manage the drug trade".
Allegations about official complicity in the drug business are nothing new when they come from activists, professors, campaigners or even former officials. However, an official spokesman for the authorities in one of Mexico's most violent states - one which directly borders Texas - going on the record with such accusations is unique.

"It's like pest control companies, they only control," Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva, the Chihuahua spokesman, told Al Jazeera last month at his office in Juarez. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."

Accusations are 'baloney'

Villanueva is not a high ranking official and his views do not represent Mexico's foreign policy establishment. Other more senior officials in Chihuahua State, including the mayor of Juarez, dismissed the claims as "baloney".

"I think the CIA and DEA [US Drug Enforcement Agency] are on the same side as us in fighting drug gangs," Hector Murguia, the mayor of Juarez, told Al Jazeera during an interview inside his SUV. "We have excellent collaboration with the US."

Under the Merida Initiative, the US Congress has approved more than $1.4bn in drug war aid for Mexico, providing attack helicopters, weapons and training for police and judges.

More than 55,000 people have died in drug related violence in Mexico since December 2006. Privately, residents and officials across Mexico's political spectrum often blame the lethal cocktail of US drug consumption and the flow of high-powered weapons smuggled south of the border for causing much of the carnage.

"The war on drugs is an illusion," Hugo Almada Mireles, professor at the Autonomous University of Juarez and author of several books, told Al Jazeera. "It's a reason to intervene in Latin America."

"The CIA wants to control the population; they don't want to stop arms trafficking to Mexico, look at [Operation] Fast and Furious,” he said, referencing a botched US exercise where automatic weapons were sold to criminals in the hope that security forces could trace where the guns ended up.
The Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms lost track of 1,700 guns as part of the operation, including an AK-47 used in 2010 the murder of Brian Terry, a Customs and Border Protection Agent.

More, HERE.

© 2014 Al Jazeera America, LLC. All rights reserved.

InSight Crime

InSight Crime is a foundation dedicated to the study of the principal threat to national and citizen security in Latin America and the Caribbean: organized crime. We seek to deepen and inform the debate about organized crime in the Americas by providing the general public with regular reporting, analysis and investigation on the subject and on state efforts to combat it. More about Insight Crime HERE.

Iguala Massacre: Mexico's PR Message Goes Up in Flames

The stunning, dramatic blow-by-blow account of what most likely happened to the 43 missing students in Guerrero is an indication of just how desperately Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto and his team are trying to perform damage control on a terrifying story -- one that has not only unsettled his government, but has pushed them to admit that things are not as their public relations machine would have you believe.

In the hour-long November 7 press conference (see video below), Attorney General Jose Murillo Karam announced that the recent capture of alleged members of the Guerreros Unidos led to confessions that the students were taken by police while en route to the town of Iguala. The police handed the students over to the Guerreros Unidos, who then killed them and burned their remains.

Specifically, video testimonies from three recently captured “masterminds” of the attacks revealed that the students were carted like cattle to a landfill in Cocula. According to one suspect, approximately 15 students asphyxiated on the way to the dump site. The remaining students were interrogated by members of the Guerreros Unidos before being shot and killed. The bodies were then thrown into the landfill, arranged in a circle, covered in sticks, gasoline, and diesel, and burned. The fire reportedly lasted for 14 hours, from midnight on September 27, until mid-afternoon.

According to the testimonies, a leader of the criminal group known as “El Terco” ordered the burned human remains to be collected and placed into eight black plastic bags. Members of the Guerreros Unidos then took the bags to the San Juan River in Cocula, where they dumped the contents into the water, while two bags were thrown directly into the river.

Following the confessions, search teams found black bags, one of which was still closed. Mexican and Argentine forensic teams reportedly confirmed the bag contained human remains. However, due to the degree to which the bodies were burned, forensic experts have not yet determined when the remains will be able to be identified.

More, HERE.

Home

A Battle Has Erupted Over Washington’s Legal Cannabis Plazas

By Bill Conroy - December 18, 2014 at 8:08 pm

The Outcome Could Help Define A Path To A Peaceful End To the Drug War

A major turf war has erupted in the grand experiment to legalize marijuana in the state of Washington.

However, this battle is being waged with the tools of politics, the courts and organizing, unlike the drug war, where disputes over control of the drug plazas, or markets, normally are settled with bullets.

The stakes are high in this turf dispute in Washington, with hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue on the table and the future of a nascent cannabis industry hanging in the balance.

More, HERE.

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Torture Report Reveals CIA’s Manipulation of US Media

By Bill Conroy - December 12, 2014

Agency Used Classified Information As Currency For Deception

The recently released Senate Select Committee on Intelligence report pillorying the CIA’s Bush-era detention and interrogation program is replete with lurid details of what would commonly be called torture, if those practices were carried out on you or me.

Waterboarding, rectal feeding, sleep deprivation, coffin-size cells and forcing detainees to stand in stress positions, even with broken bones, is the stuff of a horror movie. But there is another revelation in the long-awaited, and controversial, Senate committee report that so far seems to have slipped past much examination in the public spotlight.

More, HERE.

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US Military’s Training of Mexican Security Forces Continues As Human-Rights Abuses Mount In Mexico

Posted by Bill Conroy - December 3, 2014

DoD Officials Claim Training is Part of the Solution, Not the Problem

The U.S. government has spent more than $62 million since fiscal year 2010 providing highly specialized training to Mexican security forces, including some $16.3 million in fiscal 2013, as part of an effort to help Mexico better prosecute its war on drugs, records made public under the U.S. Foreign Assistance Act show.

Local Opposition to Washington’s Legal Marijuana Businesses Is a Taxing Issue For the Fledgling Industry

Posted by Bill Conroy - November 14, 2014

Effort to Overcome City Moratoriums on Cannabis Shops Could Spark an Unlikely Alliance

The great experiment in the state of Washington to legalize the sale of marijuana through a regulated and taxed market has hit a hitch at the local level that threatens to slow progress to a snail’s pace, even as more and more marijuana businesses obtain the state licensing needed to open their doors.

Through early November, Washington’s cannabis market, state records show, included some 63 retailers, 239 producers and 197 processors — all issued the required state-level licenses to begin doing business in the state. But the battle ahead for many of them — and others in the pipeline — to actually open their doors for business is far from over.

More, HERE.
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Labor Unions Are Supporting Washington State Legal Marijuana Dispensaries that Create "More Workers to Organize"

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 22, 2014

The United Food and Commercial Workers and other Unions Seek to Strengthen Protections for Cannabis Workers

What’s going on in the state of Washington and beyond with the movement to legalize marijuana is, only in part, about business, taxes and government oversight — all to be amplified by the billions of dollars annually this new industry promises to throw off.

More, HERE.
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Community Police in Guerrero’s Costa Chica Region to Celebrate 19 Years of a Better Way to Combat Crime and Corruption

The Same Southern Mexican State Where 43 Students Were Disappeared Is also Home to a Grassroots Movement that Shows How People Can Police Themselves When the State Becomes Criminal.

By Greg Berger and Oscar Olivera

Special for The Narco News Bulletin

November 7, 2014

Publisher’s Note: In Mexico and throughout the world the state of Guerrero has become a vivid example of the horrors of the “war on drugs” and the pervasive corruption and violence it invites from all levels of government. On September 26, Mayor Jose Luis Abarca of the city of Iguala ordered police to detain a group of students from the local Ayotzinapa teachers’ college. The mayor’s ties to organized crime have been widely documented. It is believed that the mayor thought the students were planning to stage a protest at a public event held by his wife. Police then killed six students, and 43 more were disappeared. The police reportedly turned the 43 youths over to a local criminal gang. Multiple mass graves have been dug up in the area, each at first rumored to contain the bodies of the students, then have been revealed to be the tombs of previous nameless casualties of the US-imposed drug war.

The whereabouts of the missing students are still unknown.

More, HERE.
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Millions Missing From DEA Money-Laundering Operation

Posted by Bill Conroy - October 6, 2014

But No One With the Power to Investigate Seems to Care
At least $20 million went missing from money seizures by law enforcers, critical evidence was destroyed by a federal agency, a key informant was outed by a US prosecutor — contributing to her being kidnapped and nearly killed — and at the end of the day not a single narco-trafficker was prosecuted in this four-year-long DEA undercover operation gone awry.
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Charles Bowden has died, but his voice is louder than ever

Posted by Bill Conroy - September 2, 2014

As one of the original authentic journalists, he trailblazed a path for others to follow
When I heard that he had passed, my eyes welled with tears. I’m of stoic Irish stock, so I don’t shed tears easily, but the news of Charles Bowden’s death (1945-2014) was not an easy thing to bear. He had been a mentor and a friend to me for a decade, and his leaving hurts.
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Posted by Bill Conroy - May 7, 2014
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U.S. Military: More Counter-Narcotics Funding Will Help Stem Exodus of Children from Central America

By Bill Conroy - July 29, 2014

 

Critics Argue Drug-War Money is Part of the Problem, Not the Solution.

 

Some 58,000 migrant children, mostly Central Americans, have made the treacherous journey to the U.S. southern border alone over the past 10 months, but actions being considered by U.S. officials to combat the problem with more military and drug-war aid to their countries, critics warn, may worsen the violence that provokes this unprecedented exodus.

 

The number of unaccompanied children that have arrived at the U.S. border so far this fiscal year is up 106 percent from the same period a year earlier — with the total expected to reach 90,000 before Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year.


To put that latter number in perspective, it is nearly five times larger than the number of Border Patrol agents now stationed along the entire southern border.

More, HERE.
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MORE NARCO NEWS, HERE

25 Deadliest Mass Shootings in U.S. History Fast Facts

By CNN Library; September 2, 2014

(CNN) -- Here is a list of the 25 deadliest single day mass shootings in U.S. history from 1949 to the present. If the shooter was killed or committed suicide during the incident that death is not included in the total.

Timeline:

32 killed - April 16, 2007 - Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. A gunman, 23-year-old student Seung-Hui Cho, goes on a shooting spree killing 32 people in two locations and wounds an undetermined number of others on campus. The shooter, Seung-Hui Cho then committed suicide.

27 killed - December 14, 2012 - Sandy Hook Elementary School - Newtown, Connecticut. Adam Lanza, 20, guns down 20 children, ages 6 and 7, and six adults, school staff and faculty, before turning the gun on himself. Investigating police later find Nancy Lanza, Adam's mother, dead from a gunshot wound. The final count is 28 dead, including the shooter.

23 killed - October 16, 1991 - In Killeen, Texas, 35-year-old George Hennard crashes his pickup truck through the wall of a Lubys Cafeteria. After exiting the truck, Hennard shoots and kills 23 people. He then commits suicide.

21 killed - July 18, 1984 - In San Ysidro, California, 41-year-old James Huberty, armed with a long-barreled Uzi, a pump-action shotgun and a handgun shoots and kills 21 adults and children at a local McDonalds. A police sharpshooter kills Huberty one hour after the rampage begins.

18 killed - August 1, 1966 - In Austin, Texas, Charles Joseph Whitman, a former U.S. Marine, kills 16 and wounds at least 30 while shooting from a University of Texas tower. Police officers Ramiro Martinez and Houston McCoy shot and killed Whitman in the tower. Whitman had also killed his mother and wife earlier in the day.

14 killed - August 20, 1986 - Edmond, Oklahoma part-time mail carrier, Patrick Henry Sherrill, armed with three handguns kills 14 postal workers in ten minutes and then takes his own life with a bullet to the head.

13 killed - November 5, 2009 - Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan kills 13 people and injures 32 at Fort Hood, Texas, during a shooting rampage. He is convicted and sentenced to death.

13 killed - April 3, 2009 - In Binghamton, New York, Jiverly Wong kills 13 people and injures four during a shooting at an immigrant community center. He then kills himself.

13 killed - April 20, 1999 - Columbine High School - Littleton, Colorado. 18-year-old Eric Harris and

17-year-old Dylan Klebold kill 12 fellow students and one teacher before committing suicide in the school library.

13 killed - September 25, 1982 - In Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 40-year-old George Banks, a prison guard, kills 13 people including five of his own children. In September 2011, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturns his death sentence stating that Banks is mentally incompetent.

13 killed - September 5, 1949 - In Camden, New Jersey, 28-year-old Howard Unruh, a veteran of World War II, shoots and kills 13 people as he walks down Camden's 32nd Street. His weapon of choice is a German-crafted Luger pistol. He is found insane and is committed to a state mental institution. He dies at the age of 88.

12 killed - September 16, 2013 - Shots are fired inside the Washington Navy Yard killing 12. The shooter, identified as Aaron Alexis, 34, is also killed.

12 killed - July 20, 2012 - Twelve people are killed and 58 are wounded in a shooting at an Aurora, Colorado, movie theater screening of the new Batman film. James E. Holmes, 24, is taken into custody outside of the movie theater. The gunman is dressed head-to-toe in protective tactical gear, set off two devices of some kind before spraying the theater with bullets from an AR-15 rifle, a 12-gauge shotgun and at least one of two .40-caliber handguns police recovered at the scene.

12 killed - July 29, 1999 - In Atlanta, 44-year-old Mark Barton kills his wife and two children at his home. He then opens fire in two different brokerage houses killing nine people and wounding 12. He later kills himself.

10 killed - March 10, 2009 - In Alabama, Michael McLendon of Kinston, kills 10 and himself. The dead include his mother, grandparents, aunt and uncle.

9 killed - March 21, 2005 - Red Lake High School, Red Lake, Minnesota. 16-year-old Jeff Weise kills his grandfather and another adult, five students, a teacher and a security officer. He then kills himself.

9 killed - June 18, 1990 - In Jacksonville, Florida, 42-year-old James Pough, angry about his car being repossessed, opens fire at at a General Motors Acceptance Corp. office, killing nine people. Pough takes his own life.

8 killed - October 12, 2011 - Eight people are killed during a shooting at the Salon Meritage in Seal Beach, California. The suspect, Scott Evans Dekraai, 41, of Huntington Beach, is arrested without incident as he is trying to leave the scene. The eight dead include Dekraai's ex-wife, Michelle Fournier, 48. He was armed with three guns -- a 9 mm Springfield, a Smith & Wesson .44 Magnum, and a Heckler & Koch .45 -- and was wearing body armor during the shooting rampage.

8 killed - August 3, 2010 - Manchester, Connecticut - Omar Thornton kills eight co-workers at Hartford Distributors before turning the gun on himself. Thornton had been asked to resign for stealing and selling alcoholic beverages.

8 killed - January 19, 2010 - Christopher Speight, 39, kills eight people at a house in Appomattox, Virginia. He surrenders to police at the scene the next morning, and is charged with one count of murder with additional charges pending.

8 killed - March 29, 2009 - In Carthage, North Carolina, 45-year-old Robert Stewart kills a nurse and seven elderly patients at a nursing home. In May, the Moore County district attorney announces she will seek the death penalty. On September 3, 2011, a jury finds Stewart guilty of second-degree murder. Stewart is sentenced to 141 to 179 years in prison.

8 killed - December 5, 2007 - In Omaha, Nebraska, 19-year-old Robert Hawkins goes to an area mall and kills eight shoppers before killing himself.

8 killed - July 1, 1993 - In San Francisco, 55-year-old Gian Luigi Ferri kills eight people in a law office and then kills himself.

8 killed - September 14, 1989 - In Louisville, Kentucky, 47-year-old Joseph Wesbecker armed with a AK-47 semiautomatic assault rifle, two MAC-11 semiautomatic pistols, a .38 caliber handgun, a 9-millimeter semiautomatic pistol and a bayonet kills eight co-workers at Standard Gravure Corporation and then kills himself. He had been placed on disability leave from his job due to mental problems.

8 killed - August 20, 1982 - In Miami, 51-year-old history teacher Carl Robert Brown, angry about a repair bill and armed with a shotgun, kills eight people at a machine shop. He flees by bicycle, but is shot in the back by a witness who pursued him. He was on leave from school for psychological treatment.

List of rampage killers (school massacres), by Wikipedia

List of school shootings in the United States, by Wikipedia

Starting with Pontiac's Rebellion school massacre on July 26, 1764 to August 6, 2014in River Woods Elementary when an 11-year-old student at RWES in Des Moines, Iowa, brought a BB gun to the school accompanied by two former students aged 11 & 16. The student admitted to having the weapon and making threats against 4 students. Police recovered the gun and arrested the alleged students
More, HERE.

America's Wars: U.S. Casualties and Veterans

The table below has information about the total number of service members, battle deaths, and nonmortal woundings in wars from 1775 to 2012; such as the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War I and II, Vietnam, and more
Information Please® Database, © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

67% of all homicides in the U.S. were conducted using a firearm: UN

According to the FBI, in 2012, there were 8,855 total firearm-related homicides in the US, with 6,371 of those attributed to handguns. 61% of all gun-related deaths in the U.S. are suicides. More, HERE by Wikipedia.

Crime in the United States

Crime in the United States has been present since colonization
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

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Conflict of interest in Mexico

A false start

Mixed messages in a new anti-corruption campaign

The Mexican morass

A president who doesn’t get that he doesn’t get it

IN A new year message Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, promised to work to “liberate” his country from crime, corruption and impunity. His cabinet has duly set these as its priorities. The message is the right one. But unfortunately for Mr Peña, Mexicans are increasingly cynical about the messenger.

Mexico is still seething over the government’s leaden response to the kidnap in September of 43 students by municipal police in the south-western state of Guerrero and their apparent murder by drug traffickers. The investigation of the case seems to have stalled. Mr Peña’s main policy response to the massacre is a proposed constitutional amendment to abolish municipal police forces. But Congress may not approve it, not least because some are less rotten than the state forces, which would take their place.

More, HERE.

Scandal in Mexico: A murky mortgage

Mexico: Murders and Disappearances of the Students of Ayotzinapa Was a Crime of the State - See more at: http://www.globalresearch.ca/mexico-murders-and-disappearances-of-the-students-of-ayotzinapa-was-a-crime-of-the-state/5419070#sthash.BDOkSceY.dpuf

Questions surround the purchase of a house owned by the finance minister

Dec 12th 2014

Mexico’s growing crisis: Reforms and democracy, but no rule of law

Nov 13th 2014

To save a promising presidency, Enrique Peña Nieto must tackle crime and corruption

From the print edition

DURING two years in office Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has received sharply contrasting reviews at home and abroad. Foreigners, including The Economist, have praised his structural reforms of the economy, which include an historic measure to open up energy to private investment (see article). Yet polls show that most Mexicans dislike Mr Peña. Among other things, they blame his government for a squeeze on living standards and the interlinked problems of violent crime and corruption. Sadly, recent events have lent support to Mr Peña’s domestic critics.

On November 8th Mexico’s attorney-general announced what almost everyone had already concluded: that 43 students from a teacher-training college in the southern state of Guerrero, who disappeared in the town of Iguala in late September, had been murdered by drug-traffickers after being kidnapped by the local police on the orders of the town’s mayor. Guerrero has been Mexico’s most violent state for centuries. The federal government bears no direct responsibility for these events. But Mexicans see in them a symbol of the failure of Mr Peña’s administration to make security a priority.

Now comes a problem that is uncomfortably close to home. The government had already opted to cancel a contract for a high-speed train that it had hastily awarded to the sole bidder, a consortium of Chinese and Mexican companies including a construction firm from the president’s home state. A local journalist has revealed that the boss of the same firm owns a $7m mansion that is the Peña family’s private residence (see article). The president denies any wrongdoing, but a common thread runs through these events.

Mexico only became a democracy in 2000, when seven decades of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the political machine that raised Mr Peña, were ended by electoral defeat. Unfortunately, democracy did not bring the rule of law to Mexico. Too many in the PRI still see the job of the police and the courts as enforcing political control, rather than investigating mobsters. Corrupt politicians are protected rather than punished. Organised crime and graft both remain a part of everyday life, and neither has been helped by the drugs flowing north to the United States.

More, HERE